Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash.
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BLM Begins Reclassification of Public Domain Lands in Western Oregon - 04/05/19

Portland, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced that it will begin to prepare an environmental assessment for the reclassification of public domain lands as part of the implementation of the Western Oregon Tribal Fairness Act. The Act, signed into law by President Trump on January 8, 2018, directed the BLM to transfer 14,742 acres of public lands to be managed in trust to benefit the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians, and 17,519 acres to be managed on behalf of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians.

In addition to transferring these lands into trust for the Tribes, the law also requires the BLM to identify and convert approximately 32,000 acres of public domain lands to be managed under the Oregon and California Lands (O&C lands) Act of 1937. Reclassifying these lands as O&C lands will allow 18 western Oregon counties to share in a portion of receipts from timber sales on these lands, which directly benefit local communities that depend on timber for jobs and economic development.

“BLM, Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs will continue to work as a team to accomplish these goals and collectively meet all identified benchmarks.  We’ve made great progress so far and the reclassification of these lands is the next step in the process. We are confident that by working together we will meet our shared commitments to support economic growth for the Tribes and local communities, and fulfill our obligations under the Western Oregon Tribal Fairness Act,” said Theresa Hanley, Acting Oregon State Director.

According to Dan Courtney, Chair of the Cow Creek Umpqua Tribe, “This forest will sustain and protect drinking water, wildlife, and local mills benefiting the health of a community we share with many. Additionally, we all benefit as Tribal management practices have long demonstrated increased timber yields, suppressed fire dangers, and maintained biodiversity, providing a national model for sustainable forest management.”

Confederated Tribes Chief Warren Brainard shared “After the Tribes restoration, in 1986 I began to work with Council on the first forest plan. This is a lifetime accomplishment that I feel privileged to be a part of. We did this for our people, for the success of seven generations and beyond.”  

The law requires that these public domain lands be approximately equal in acreage and condition as the Oregon and California grant lands that are being held in trust for the Tribes. The reclassification of public domain lands to O&C lands will not change the management of the land, which is governed by the 2016 Northwestern and Coastal Oregon Resource Management Plan and the Southwestern Oregon Resource Management Plan. Timber sales on public domain lands do not result in any direct payments to counties, whereas, the Oregon and California Lands Act of 1937 provides that 50 percent of receipts from the sale of timber are allocated annually among the 18 western Oregon counties. The allocation formula is based on each county's proportion of the 1915 assessed value of the O&C lands and will not be affected by this effort. This effort will examine which of the approximately 32,000 acres of public domain lands will be reclassified under the Oregon and California Lands Act of 1937. 

The reclassified lands may be within any of the following Oregon and California grant land counties: Benton, Coos, Clackamas, Columbia, Curry, Douglas, Jackson, Josephine, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Tillamook, Washington, and Yamhill Counties. 

The BLM is beginning to prepare an environmental assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act to facilitate public involvement and assist in agency decision-making. The environmental assessment will consider alternative selections of PD lands to reclassify as O&C lands.

The beginning of this process, also known as scoping, is an opportunity for the public to identify issues to be considered within this reclassification process. An interactive map that details the location of the public domain lands that are being examined for reclassification, along with other planning materials, is available online at: https://www.blm.gov/oregon-washington/serving-america/western-oregon-tribal-fairness-act.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.

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Temporary Closure of Hyatt Lake Campground (Photo) - 03/28/19

Ashland, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is announcing temporary closures, starting in late May 2019, to the Hyatt Lake Campground. 

A 1960s-era electrical line will be replaced to restore operation of sewage treatment and water facilities at the campground. To ensure public safety while this work is being done, campsites in Loops A and B will be temporarily closed. Campsites in Loop C and Wildcat will remain open. Hyatt Lake's boat ramps, day use area, group campsites, and group picnic shelter will also remain open. Portable toilets and hand-washing stations will be available at the campground during the construction period. Loop A and B campsites will be reopened as soon as construction is complete.

Campers and visitors should plan accordingly.  Regular updates on this project will be published to:  

www.recreation.gov.  

Nestled in the Cascade Mountains in the northern corner of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, the 745-acre Hyatt Lake Recreation Area provides opportunities for camping, hiking, fishing, and boating. Reservations are required for Hyatt Lake Campground (there are no first-come, first-serve campsites available).

Day-use is on a first-come, first-served basis and permits may be obtained at the self-service pay stations located at the main campground entrance and Wildcat Campground. Main campground opens at the end of May and closes right after Labor Day. Wildcat opens at the end of May and closes first of October, weather dependent. A 14-day camping limit within a 90-day period is in effect for all campgrounds.  Additional information about the Hyatt Lake is available at:

https://www.blm.gov/visit/hyatt-lake-recreation-area.

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The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.

Attached Media Files: Hyatt_lake.jpg
Acting Secretary Bernhardt Signs Order to Prioritize Implementation of Bipartisan Public Lands Bill - 03/28/19

WASHINGTON – Yesterday, U.S. Acting Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt signed a secretarial order to establish a Departmental task force to facilitate and prioritize the implementation of S. 47, the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act (Dingell Act). The bill was made up of more than 100 individual bills that were introduced by 50 Senators and several House members. The Interior Department had advocated for in concept or worked with Members of Congress on many of the individual provisions that made up the package.

Secretarial Order 3374, Implementation of the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act establishes a task force to ensure the timely and coordinated implementation of the Dingell Act and consistency among all offices and Bureaus within the Department of the Interior.

“We are taking a concrete step to ensure the Department efficiently and fully implements the most comprehensive public lands management legislation in a decade,” said Acting Secretary Bernhardt. “We will continue to work to strike the proper balance for land and resources management, increase access for hunting, fishing, and recreation, and create economic prosperity while protecting and preserving America’s treasures.”

“The entire recreation industry – from boating and fishing, hunting and snowmobiling, paddling and ORVing, skiing and climbing, to camping and biking – came together to support the passage of the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, a monumental win for the recreation economy and outdoor enthusiasts across the country,” said Outdoor Recreation Roundtable Executive Director Jessica Wahl. “With today’s Secretarial Order, we look forward to the timely implementation of dozens of important recreation provisions that have been decades in the making, as well as partnering with the task force to ensure the full potential of this groundbreaking legislation is unlocked.”

“The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation praises Acting Secretary Bernhardt and the Interior Department for prioritizing the John Dingell Lands Package through this important Secretarial Order,” said Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation President Jeff Crane. “S. 47 provides the most significant, positive advances for conservation as well as sportsmen’s access in a decade, and we look forward to working with the department and its bureaus during the implementation process.”

“Passage of John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act (S.47), which included provisions of the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps Act (21CSC), provides an opportunity to demonstrate a renewed commitment to a wide variety of conservation and recreation priorities for this Administration, including the engagement of youth, young adults, and veterans. We are pleased to see the establishment of a departmental task force to facilitate implementation of S.47. Our network stands ready to work with the task force and help make 21CSC a part of Interior’s conservation legacy,” said the Corps Network President and CEO and Partnership for the 21CSC Co-Chair Mary Ellen Sprenkel.

Background

The task force will be chaired by the Associate Deputy Secretary with membership consisting of the Assistant Secretary for Lands and Minerals Management, Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks, Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs, Assistant Secretary for Policy, Management, and Budget, Assistant Secretary for Insular and International Areas, and the Solicitor.

Secretarial Order 3374 lays out timeframes for the task force to identify actionable steps and milestones, create an implementation plan for the Dingell Act, and manage a tracking database to ensure the Department meets all timelines laid out the bipartisan public lands bill.

DOI is entrusted with the conservation and management of the Nation’s natural resources and cultural heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of the American people and future generations, which includes more than 500 million acres of Federal lands and resources.

About the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act

Throughout the Trump Administration, the Interior Department had advocated for in concept or worked with Members of Congress on many of the individual provisions that make up the Dingell Act. Below is a partial list of those proposals and actions the Administration has taken to advance these policies.

Department Proposed

Reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (Included as FY2019 Budget proposal
Establishment of the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Home National Monument (December 2017 report on National Monuments)

Testified in support of provisions as written or with changes

  • Reauthorization of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Historic Preservation Program
  • Establishment of the Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park
  • Alaska Native Veterans Land Allotment Equity Act
  • Rio Puerco Watershed Management Committee Reauthorization
  • Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Conservation Act
  • Udall Park Land Exchange Completion Act
  • Endangered Fish Recovery Programs Extension Act
  • Federal Closing Date for Hunting of Ducks, Mergansers, and Coots
  • National Geologic Mapping Act Reauthorization
  • Chugach Alaska Land Exchange Study
  • San Juan County Settlement Implementation Act
  • Acadia National Park Boundary Clarification Act
  • Santa Ana River Wash Plan Land Exchange
  • FDR Historic Preservation Act
  • Reconstruction Era National Historical Park Act
  • Pottawattamie County Reversionary Interest Conveyance Act
  • Mill Springs Battlefield National Monument Act
  • Helium Extraction Act
  • Emery County Public Land Management Act
  • Golden Spike 150th Anniversary Act
  • La Paz County Land Conveyance Act
  • Expansion of WaterSMART Program grants
  • Deschutes Canyon-Steelhead Falls Wilderness Study Area Boundary Adjustment
  • Robert Emmet Park Act
  • World War II Pacific Sites Establishment Act
  • Strengthening Coastal Communities Act

Departmental action to advance or support the concept or goal

  • Public lands are "open unless closed" to hunting and fishing - The Department has expanding hunting and fishing opportunities on dozens of wildlife refuges and thousands more acres of other public lands
  • Every Kid Outdoors Act - In 2018 the Department renewed the Every Kid in a Park program for a year, giving Congress more time to permanently authorize it
  • Allows sportsmen to carry unarmed bows across National Park Service land – The Department finalized the rule in October 2018
  • Identifies opportunities for recreation, hunting, and fishing on Federal lands - DOI initiated this process in a September 2017 Secretarial Order
  • Camp Nelson National Monument - President Trump designated Camp Nelson as a national monument in October 2018
  • African American Civil Rights Network Technical Corrections - The Department has designated a number of historic sites on the newly created network
  • Develop shooting ranges on public lands - In 2018 the Department began the process to allow the Bureau of Land Management to manage appropriate public lands as target shooting ranges

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