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Project Folklorist, Joe O'Connell
Project Folklorist, Joe O'Connell
Oregon Folklife Network to Receive $55,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (Photo) - 07/22/19

[Eugene, OR]—National Endowment for the Arts acting chair Mary Anne Carter has approved more than $27 million in grants as part of its first major funding announcement for fiscal year 2019-20.  Included in this announcement is an Art Works grant of $55,000 to the Oregon Folklife Network to support a folklife survey on Oregon’s north and central coast. Art Works is the National Endowment for the Arts’ principal grantmaking program. The agency received 1,605 Art Works applications for this round of grantmaking and will award 972 grants in the Folk & Traditional Arts category.

 

“The arts enhance our communities and our lives, and we look forward to seeing these projects take place throughout the country, giving Americans opportunities to learn, to create, to heal and to celebrate,” Carter said.  

 

“Oregon Folklife Network is so pleased to have another year of NEA support for our documentation of Oregon’s living cultural heritage,” commented Riki Saltzman, the network’s executive director.

With the newly secured funding, Oregon Folklife Network will work with folklorists Douglas Manger and Joe O’Connell to identify culture keepers in cultural, occupational, regional and religious traditions in the Northwest and Central Oregon Coast counties of Clatsop, Tillamook, and Lincoln, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, as well as the coastal sections of Lane and Douglas counties.

Saltzman said that the researchers are looking to include folk and traditional artists from a range of heritage groups including but not limited to Asian and Pacific Islanders, African Americans, Latinos, Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and Europeans. They are also hoping to document examples of the areas’ occupational folklife, including chainsaw carving, hunting, dairy farming, commercial fishing, clamming, shrimping and other waterways traditions. The folklorists will also document foodways, music, storytelling and other relevant folk expressions.

An ongoing project, the statewide survey has so far identified over 355 folk and traditional artists in 28 counties as well as in the Klamath Tribes, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla, the Burns Paiute, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Oregon Folklife Network partners with local and state organizations and Tribes to refer tradition bearers and folk artists for programs in parks, arts organizations, libraries, or festivals. They also preserve this documentation in their archives.

Oregon Folklife Network encourages recommendations of folk and traditional artists to include in the survey. Recommendations can be made by phone at 541-346-3820 or emailed to Saltzman at iki@uoregon.edu">riki@uoregon.edu or Emily West at eafanado@uoregon.edu.

The Oregon Folklife Network is administered by the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and is the state’s designated Folk and Traditional Arts Program.

For more information on this National Endowment for the Arts grant announcement, visit arts.gov/news.

Project folklorists conducting the Summer 2019 Northwest and Central Oregon Coast are:

Douglas Manger is a career folklorist with over 20 years of experience. Since 2014 he has collaborated with Oregon Folklife Network on folklife surveys in Southeastern Oregon (Malheur and Harney counties); the High Desert region, 2016 (Deschutes, Crook, Baker, Union); Portland Metro region, 2016 (Yamhill and Clackamas); and in August of this year, the Oregon coast (Douglas, Tillamook, Clatsop). Early in his career, Manger directed the Northern Tier Cultural Alliance in Pennsylvania. He later managed folk and traditional arts programming at Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation in Baltimore serving nine states and jurisdictions. At Mid Atlantic, Manger project managed the award-winning publication, From Bridge to Boardwalk: An Audio Journey Across Maryland’s Eastern Shore. In 2007, Manger returned home to Texas to found HeritageWorks. HeritageWorks has since conducted multi-year regional folklife field surveys in South and East Texas for the Institute of Texan Cultures in San Antonio, and in Baton Rouge and vicinity for the Louisiana Folklife Program. A Pecos Valley survey for San Angelo’s Museum of Fine Arts is scheduled for later this year. douglas@heritageworks.net  

Joe O’Connell has ten years of public folklore experience spanning studies of vernacular music, laborlore, and material culture.  He completed an MA in Folklore at the University of Oregon in 2009, and upcoming fieldwork on the Oregon Coast marks his second collaboration with the Oregon Folklife Network Folklife Network, this time in Lincoln and Clatsop counties, the coastal section of Lane County, and with the Confederated Tribes of Siletz. Along with Josephine McRobbie, Joe is a 2019 American Folklife Center Archie Green Fellow. O’Connell and McRobbie will be conducting oral histories with midwives and other birth workers across the state of North Carolina.  Joe is also an active folk-rock music recording artist, making music under the band name Elephant Micah. He lives in Durham, North Carolina. joseph.martin.oconnell@gmail.com

Project Folklorist, Joe O'Connell
Project Folklorist, Joe O'Connell
Oregon Folklife Network to Receive $55,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (Photo) - 07/22/19

Project folklorists conducting the Summer 2019 Northwest and Central Oregon Coast are:

Douglas Manger is a career folklorist with over 20 years of experience. Since 2014 he has collaborated with Oregon Folklife Network on folklife surveys in Southeastern Oregon (Malheur and Harney counties); the High Desert region, 2016 (Deschutes, Crook, Baker, Union); Portland Metro region, 2016 (Yamhill and Clackamas); and in August of this year, the Oregon coast (Douglas, Tillamook, Clatsop). Early in his career, Manger directed the Northern Tier Cultural Alliance in Pennsylvania. He later managed folk and traditional arts programming at Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation in Baltimore serving nine states and jurisdictions. At Mid Atlantic, Manger project managed the award-winning publication, From Bridge to Boardwalk: An Audio Journey Across Maryland’s Eastern Shore. In 2007, Manger returned home to Texas to found HeritageWorks. HeritageWorks has since conducted multi-year regional folklife field surveys in South and East Texas for the Institute of Texan Cultures in San Antonio, and in Baton Rouge and vicinity for the Louisiana Folklife Program. A Pecos Valley survey for San Angelo’s Museum of Fine Arts is scheduled for later this year. douglas@heritageworks.net  

Joe O’Connell has ten years of public folklore experience spanning studies of vernacular music, laborlore, and material culture.  He completed an MA in Folklore at the University of Oregon in 2009, and upcoming fieldwork on the Oregon Coast marks his second collaboration with the Oregon Folklife Network Folklife Network, this time in Lincoln and Clatsop counties, the coastal section of Lane County, and with the Confederated Tribes of Siletz. Along with Josephine McRobbie, Joe is a 2019 American Folklife Center Archie Green Fellow. O’Connell and McRobbie will be conducting oral histories with midwives and other birth workers across the state of North Carolina.  Joe is also an active folk-rock music recording artist, making music under the band name Elephant Micah. He lives in Durham, North Carolina. joseph.martin.oconnell@gmail.com

[Eugene, OR]—National Endowment for the Arts acting chair Mary Anne Carter has approved more than $27 million in grants as part of its first major funding announcement for fiscal year 2019-20.  Included in this announcement is an Art Works grant of $55,000 to the Oregon Folklife Network to support a folklife survey on Oregon’s north and central coast. Art Works is the National Endowment for the Arts’ principal grantmaking program. The agency received 1,605 Art Works applications for this round of grantmaking and will award 972 grants in the Folk & Traditional Arts category.

 

“The arts enhance our communities and our lives, and we look forward to seeing these projects take place throughout the country, giving Americans opportunities to learn, to create, to heal and to celebrate,” Carter said.  

 

“Oregon Folklife Network is so pleased to have another year of NEA support for our documentation of Oregon’s living cultural heritage,” commented Riki Saltzman, the network’s executive director.

With the newly secured funding, Oregon Folklife Network will work with folklorists Douglas Manger and Joe O’Connell to identify culture keepers in cultural, occupational, regional and religious traditions in the Northwest and Central Oregon Coast counties of Clatsop, Tillamook, and Lincoln, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, as well as the coastal sections of Lane and Douglas counties.

Saltzman said that the researchers are looking to include folk and traditional artists from a range of heritage groups including but not limited to Asian and Pacific Islanders, African Americans, Latinos, Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and Europeans. They are also hoping to document examples of the areas’ occupational folklife, including chainsaw carving, hunting, dairy farming, commercial fishing, clamming, shrimping and other waterways traditions. The folklorists will also document foodways, music, storytelling and other relevant folk expressions.

An ongoing project, the statewide survey has so far identified over 355 folk and traditional artists in 28 counties as well as in the Klamath Tribes, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla, the Burns Paiute, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Oregon Folklife Network partners with local and state organizations and Tribes to refer tradition bearers and folk artists for programs in parks, arts organizations, libraries, or festivals. They also preserve this documentation in their archives.

Oregon Folklife Network encourages recommendations of folk and traditional artists to include in the survey. Recommendations can be made by phone at 541-346-3820 or emailed to Saltzman at iki@uoregon.edu">riki@uoregon.edu or Emily West at eafanado@uoregon.edu.

The Oregon Folklife Network is administered by the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and is the state’s designated Folk and Traditional Arts Program.

For more information on this National Endowment for the Arts grant announcement, visit arts.gov/news.