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News Releases
Media Availability on Monday, June 17 with ONA nurses from Providence Hospitals - 06/16/24

WHAT: In advance of the nurses’ strike that begins June 18, representatives from some of the striking units will be available to talk with the media about why they are going on strike, what negotiations have been like these past nine months, and what they hope to achieve.

WHEN/WHERE: Monday, June 17 from 10-11 a.m.   
Oregon Nurses Association, 18765 SW Boones Ferry Road, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Tualatin  

Media who are unable to attend in person should schedule a time to talk with a nurse via video conference or phone during the allotted time by emailing Myrna Jensen at Jensen@OregonRN.org

WHO: Nurse leaders from Providence bargaining units who will go on strike Tuesday, June 18 at 6 a.m.

WHY: On June 7, nurses from six Providence hospitals issued a ten-day notice of their intent to hold a limited duration 3-day strike from June 18-20. The action came after months of negotiations and four days of central mediation where little movement was made on the nurses’ top priorities of safe staffing, affordable health care, increased paid time off and market wages.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 20,000 nurses, and health care professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org.

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2024-06-07_ProvGroup_Strike_cropped.jpg
2024-06-07_ProvGroup_Strike_cropped.jpg
Largest nurses strike in Oregon history to begin June 18 (Photo) - 06/07/24

More than 3000 ONA-represented nurses from six Providence facilities to hold 3-day strike  

(Portland, Ore.) - On June 7, 2024, nurses at Providence St. Vincent, Providence Newberg, Providence Willamette Falls, Providence Medford, Providence Hood River and Providence Milwaukie, represented by the Oregon Nurses Association, delivered a 10-day notice of their intent to strike to management. The notice informed management that the more than 3,000 nurses at the six facilities intend to begin their strike on June 18, 2024, at 6:00 a.m.  

“At Providence Medford, we are facing a staffing crisis, and our nurses are overworked, offered low quality healthcare, and paid less than the current market for nurses in Medford,” said Caroline Allison, RN at Providence Medford. “Adding insult to injury, it has now become clear that Providence appears to be systematically trying to undermine Oregon’s Safe Staffing Law. The Safe Staffing Law was intended to solve the nurse workforce shortage crisis and allow us to greatly enhance patient care. Instead, Providence has again made the decision to focus on its bottom lines instead of their workforce, their communities, and their patients. This is why I voted to strike. Because if a $28 billion dollar healthcare corporation isn’t going to fight for the community, our patients, and our nurses, then we will.”  

Nurses and management have been engaged in contract negotiations for as long as nine months. Since the beginning of bargaining, nurses’ priorities have remained unchanged: commitment to Oregon’s Safe Staffing Law; affordable and quality healthcare; and market-competitive wages to retain talented nurses and recruit more to fill the many open shifts. After a four-day mediation session that wrapped up today, nurses said it was clear that hospital management wasn’t interested in responding to their concerns with serious proposals.  

Jessica Lobell, RN and bargaining team member from Providence St. Vincent, said during a press conference this afternoon, “This may be a surprise to many of you listening today, but Providence nurses often have worse health insurance than our patients. Let me repeat that very clearly: the healthcare package that Providence continues to offer us and advertise as best-in-class is worse than most people we care for every day.”

Community members can visit RespectOurNurses.com to learn more about ongoing negotiations, sign a community petition in support of the nurses, and get information about the impact of a potential strike.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 20,000 nurses, and health care professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org.
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Media Alert: Union Leaders for Six Providence Bargaining Units to Hold Press Conference to Announce the Largest Nurses Strike in Oregon History - 06/07/24

WHAT: Over the last four days, Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) nurses from Providence St. Vincent, Providence Newberg, Providence Willamette Falls, Providence Medford, Providence Hood River and Providence Milwaukie have been in mediation with Providence Health System. Following prepared remarks, nurses will be available for questions from the press.   

WHEN: 3:00 p.m., Friday, June 7, 2024   

WHERE: Holiday Inn, 25425 SW 95th Ave, Wilsonville   
Press who are unable to attend in person are invited to attend online at the following link: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/83162013818?pwd=BbzLQI1ACb9eZoH0bs2YKJ90fnVgOo.1    

WHO:   

Virginia Smith, RN, Member of ONA Board of Directors and Chair of ONA Providence Willamette Falls Bargaining Unit

Jessica Carrier Lobell, RN, Member of ONA Board of Directors and ONA Providence St. Vincent Bargaining Team

Caroline Allison, RN, ONA Providence Medford Bargaining Team

Denise Arnold, RN, ONA Providence Newberg Bargaining Team

Anne Tan Piazza, Executive Director, Oregon Nurses Association


WHY: Nurses are demanding Providence give them a fair contract that is in compliance with Oregon’s Safe Staffing law and prioritizes affordable, quality healthcare. Nurses are also demanding that Providence executives increase their focus on recruiting, retaining, and respecting frontline nurses. Despite four days of negotiations, an agreement was not reached and nurses issued a 10-day notice for a 3-day strike. 

Last month, nurses from six facilities across the state of Oregon voted overwhelmingly to authorize their bargaining units call for strikes if necessary. Three of the bargaining units have been at the table for more than eight months. All six bargaining units are working under expired contracts.  

The mediation occurred the same week ONA wrote a letter to the Oregon Health Authority, stating that hospitals across the state, including Providence, are “engaged in a coordinated attempt to undermine the law, flagrantly ignore the law's provisions, and thereby worsen patient care and working conditions for nurses."   

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 20,000 nurses, and health care professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org.

Governor Tina Kotek signs Oregon's Hospital Safe Staffing Bill during a ceremonial event at the State Capitol August 15, 2024. Photo courtesy of ONA.
Governor Tina Kotek signs Oregon's Hospital Safe Staffing Bill during a ceremonial event at the State Capitol August 15, 2024. Photo courtesy of ONA.
Hospital Executives Sabotage Staffing Law, Jeopardizing Patient and Nurse Safety (Photo) - 06/05/24

(Portland, OR) -  After receiving a flood of complaints from members across the state, the Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) submitted a letter to the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) yesterday detailing numerous instances of hospital executives purposefully undermining Oregon’s Hospital Safe Staffing Law and worsening patient care and working conditions. The letter and subsequent complaints show clear evidence of hospitals flagrantly ignoring the law’s longstanding requirement that staffing plans be approved by staffing committees. By repudiating existing plans, submitting plans that nurses have rejected, and increasing patient assignments; hospitals are threatening nurse and healthcare workers’ well-being and increasing risks to patients.

Oregon’s Hospital Safe Staffing Law was first passed in 2001 and was revised in 2023 with bipartisan legislation (House Bill 2697) backed by healthcare unions— including ONA, Oregon Federation of Nurses and Health Professionals (OFNHP), SEIU 49, and Oregon AFSCME—the Hospital Association of Oregon (HAO) and representatives from Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU), Providence, and Salem Health. The law establishes maximum patient assignments, wall-to-wall staffing committees, and ends the “buddy break system” among other measures to improve Oregonians’ quality of care and reduce burnout and turnover of skilled frontline caregivers. 

Despite having a strong say in the legislation through the HAO and hospital and health system representatives, the new law has been met with resistance by some hospital executives who are choosing to prioritize profits over patient care. Instead of adhering to the law's safe staffing rules, executives are flagrantly flouting the law by disregarding existing safe staffing plans, submitting unapproved plans to OHA, and unilaterally adopting staffing plans that are not in compliance with several statutory requirements. These unlawful staffing plans generally force fewer nurses to care for more patients—costing nurses and patients—and reversing the progress healthcare professionals have made to improve care and staff retention.  

"Enough is enough,” said Chris Rompala, an ONA board member and nurse at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center in Springfield, OR. “Hospital executives are playing a dangerous game with our patients’ health and safety and the wellbeing of nurses. This is the type of blatant disregard for workers that causes nurse burnout and created our staffing crisis in the first place. Oregonians' lives are on the line. Nurses and healthcare providers will not sit by while corporate executives charge patients a premium while lowering standards. Our patients and coworkers deserve better. We expect hospitals to follow the law they helped pass and we will use all means necessary to make sure corporate hospital executives are held accountable to the Oregonians they serve."

As of Wednesday, June 5, ONA has filed more than a dozen OHA complaints on behalf of our members. This is in addition to the countless number of complaints nurses across Oregon are submitting. ONA has alerted OHA Director Dr. Sejal Hathi, the Governor's office, and the Oregon senators and representatives who played a key role in passing the law about hospital executives’ efforts to sabotage it. ONA also sent a cease and desist letter to PeaceHealth CEO Liz Dunne, demanding PeaceHealth stop its deliberate violations of the law.

"The allegations from nurses that some hospitals are trying to undermine the safe staffing law are troubling. We all know that nurses work tirelessly to care for some of Oregon's most vulnerable people and this legislation, HB 2697, was passed to ensure that we could enhance patient care and allow nurses to do their jobs more effectively without burning out,” said State Representative Rob Nosse, chair of the House Health Care Committee. “First and foremost, I am committed to working with the Governor's office, legislative leaders, the Oregon Health Authority, and hospital administrators to ensure HB 2697 is fully enforced so hospitals won't violate this historic law."

ONA has pledged to “devote all available resources and employ all necessary tactics to fight back against this deliberate and coordinated attempt to undermine HB 2697” including filing complaints against any entity that seeks to undermine safe staffing. We are calling on hospital executives to comply with the law and OHA to immediately investigate all complaints submitted by ONA and our members and to hold hospitals accountable to the fullest extent of the law. 

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Providers from Providence Health System Demand Fair Contracts, Nurses Announce Results of Strike Authorization Votes - 05/31/24

(Portland, Ore.) - Doctors, nurses, physician associates, nurse midwives and other Providence employees came together for a joint press conference on Thursday, May 30 demanding that Providence executives come to the table and bargain fair contracts that put patients before profits. Caregivers from Providence hospitals and clinics in Oregon are also asking for a say in scheduling, retirement and health benefits and market-rate wages.  

“Before the pandemic, our patient capacity as set by Providence for a 12-hour shift was 24. Today, that number has skyrocketed to an arbitrary 36. What was once considered exceptional circumstances has become the norm. In the last 30 days alone, I have not seen less than 36 patients in a single shift,” said Piper Sullivan, a physician associate from Providence Immediate Care in Sherwood and a speaker at the press conference. “To quote recent [Providence] leadership communication in regards to our patient capacity policy, ‘it is a hard day, but it does not cross over into unreasonable or unsafe for urgent care.’ We are drowning and have been drowning.”

“We have often been told by Providence that we cost the hospital money rather than make any profit and that we need to do more to make more money. And the net negative is true on the surface. Obstetrics is a field that is poorly compensated by insurance companies. What you don’t see is our level 3 neonatal intensive care unit, it is undeniably profitable,” said Dr. Jennifer Lincoln, an OBGYN from Providence St. Vincent. “Without our 24/7/365 presence as OB hospitalists on the unit, the NICU as it operates today would not exist because the very sick babies born in our hospital would be sent somewhere else. The pregnant patients who are hospitalized on our fabulous perinatal special care unit, sometimes for months at a time, would be transferred to a different hospital were we not a few steps away to intervene or perform a lifesaving emergency Cesarean section at a moment’s notice. So, I would say we make the hospital money.”

During the press conference, it was announced that ONA-represented nurses from six Providence hospitals had overwhelmingly authorized strikes if necessary. From June 4-7, nurses at Providence St. Vincent, Newberg, Medford, Willamette Falls, Hood River and Milwaukie will meet with management for central mediation. Despite months of negotiations, Providence has failed to move on nurses’ top priorities of affordable healthcare, safe staffing language in the contract, and wages that are competitive with other area hospitals. ONA has filed multiple unfair labor practices (ULPs) alleging the following: refusal to bargain; bargaining in bad faith; unilateral implementation of mandatory subjects, denial of access to employee representatives and retaliation against union leaders.

To view the full press conference, visit ONA’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/OregonNursesAssociation/videos/895810379022215  (video courtesy of ONA)

Pictures from the press conference are available upon request.

The Pacific Northwest Hospital Medicine Association (PNWHMA) was created in 2015 as the first hospitalist-specific labor union in the United States. It has since expanded to represent more doctors and advanced practice providers. PNWHMA is affiliated with AFT Healthcare—the fastest-growing healthcare union in the country. AFT Healthcare represents more than 200,000 members in 100 locals in 18 states and territories.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 18,000 nurses, and healthcare professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org.  

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ONA Statement on OHSU/Legacy Merger - 05/30/24

Nurses and Healthcare Professionals Commit to Watchdog Role to Ensure OHSU Delivers on its Promises for the Largest Health Care Merger in Oregon History

(Portland, OR) - OHSU’s billion dollar acquisition of Legacy Health is a pivotal moment for healthcare in Oregon and has far reaching implications for patients, healthcare workers and communities across the state. 

Hospital executives have promised to deliver better patient care, greater efficiency, and expanded services, but we know corporate mergers like this often result in higher costs and lower quality care. To avoid those pitfalls, OHSU and Legacy cannot leave this process exclusively in the hands of C-suite executives. Hospital leaders must think differently and invite health advocates and experts in the field–including frontline nurses and healthcare professionals at Legacy and OHSU–to the table to ensure this unprecedented merger process is open, transparent, and delivers on its promises to Oregonians. 

This agreement must increase health care services, quality and access for patients, and equip and support providers to better care for all our community members. That includes ensuring OHSU’s merger money does not come out of patients’ or workers’ pockets. OHSU needs to work on improving services and investing in our community without sacrificing current standards. 

As it becomes Oregon’s largest healthcare employer, OHSU must commit to maintaining and improving healthcare coverage and benefits for the more than 30,000 healthcare workers who serve Oregonians across the state and are critical to this merger’s success. In the wake of a $1 billion buyout and rich executive compensation and bonuses, Oregonians will not tolerate cuts to frontline health professional’s health insurance or efforts to force OHSU’s lowest-paid workers and their families to shoulder additional costs and jeopardize their access to healthcare. OHSU must also commit to honoring Oregon’s best-in-the-nation hospital safe staffing law and following the staffing plans and decisions from its internal staffing committees. These dual commitments are necessary to preserve and increase Oregonians’ access to health care and raise quality standards for all Oregonians. 

The Oregon Nurses Association has a long history of advancing the health of patients, and improving the working conditions of nurses and healthcare providers at OHSU. In fact, we know patients and staff benefit when healthcare workers are unionized–no matter which hospital or clinic they work in. The research shows patients are healthier and staff have safer working conditions, higher wages, better benefits and more job satisfaction when they have a strong voice to advocate for their patients and their community. 

ONA nurses, advanced practice providers, and professionals at OHSU and Legacy enjoy a strong connection with their unrepresented colleagues at Legacy and are eager to work together to uplift our new shared community. As the merger process evolves, we look forward to making new connections and building bridges to ensure all nurses and healthcare professionals at Legacy are empowered to retain important aspects of their identity; advocate for their patients, colleagues and community; and fight for the highest workplace and healthcare standards. 

We are committed to being a thoughtful partner with nurses, healthcare professionals, executives and communities throughout Oregon during and after this merger. We hope OHSU and Legacy executives will listen to and engage directly with frontline nurses and healthcare professionals in both systems so we can help this merger defy the odds and deliver on their promises to Oregonians. We look forward to reviewing the full details of today’s agreement and engaging in state and national regulatory reviews as we continue fighting for the rights and best interests of Oregon’s healthcare professionals and patients. 

ONA represents more than 4,500 nurses and advanced practice providers at OHSU hospitals and clinics throughout the state and more than 1,300 nurses, doctors, advanced practice providers, and allied health professionals at Legacy hospitals and clinics across Oregon and Washington.

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Media Alert: Caregivers from Providence Hospitals and Clinics to Hold Press Conference May 30 to Demand Management Negotiate Fair Contracts - 05/29/24

WHAT: Caregivers from Providence hospitals and clinics in Oregon demand management bargain in good faith and settle contracts with union-represented frontline healthcare workers. Doctors, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, nurses, and physician associates from Providence Women’s Clinics, Immediate Care Clinics, St. Vincent and Medford are bargaining first contracts. At the same time, ONA-represented nurses from Providence hospitals including Providence St. Vincent, Newberg, Hood River, Medford, Willamette Falls and Milwaukie have been bargaining for months and will take part in a rare six-table mediation session with management June 4-7.

WHEN/WHERE:  

Thursday, May 30 from 11:00 – 11:45 a.m.  
Providence Park, corner of SW 18th & SW Morrison St., Portland 
(The press conference will be streamed live on ONA’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/OregonNursesAssociation)  

WHO:  

  • Virginia Smith, RN, Member of ONA Board of Directors and Chair of ONA’s Providence Willamette Falls Bargaining Unit
  • Dr. Charlie Saltalamacchia, OB/GYN, Providence Women’s Clinic
  • Piper Sullivan, PA-C, Providence Immediate Care Clinic - Sherwood
  • Dr. Jennifer Lincoln, IBCLC, OB Hospitalist, Providence St. Vincent
  • Denise Arnold, RN, Chair of ONA’s Providence Newberg Bargaining Team  
  • Gina Ottinger, RN, Secretary of ONA’s Providence St. Vincent Executive Team 
     

WHY:  
Oregon is a hotbed for union organizing and caregivers from Providence facilities are joining in historic numbers. The corporatization of healthcare has left many feeling frustrated and burnt out. They organized to have a voice in institutional decisions that affect patients and caregivers.  

Nurses from six Providence hospitals are joining the physicians and advanced practice providers to call attention to their months-long contract negotiations and announce the results of strike authorization votes. In recent weeks, little movement has been made on the nurses’ top priorities of safe staffing, affordable health care, increased paid time off and market wages. ONA filed ULPs alleging the following: refusal to bargain; bargaining in bad faith; unilateral implementation of mandatory subjects, denial of access to employee representatives and retaliation against union leaders. Next week all six facilities with open contracts will take part in a joint table mediation.  

 

The Pacific Northwest Hospital Medicine Association (PNWHMA) was created in 2015 as the first hospitalist-specific labor union in the United States. It has since expanded to represent more doctors and advanced practice providers. PNWHMA is affiliated with AFT Healthcare—the fastest-growing healthcare union in the country. AFT Healthcare represents more than 200,000 members in 100 locals in 18 states and territories.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 18,000 nurses, and healthcare professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org.

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Media Advisory: Caregivers from Providence Hospitals and Clinics to Hold Press Conference May 30 to Demand Management Negotiate Fair Contracts - 05/29/24

WHAT: Caregivers from Providence hospitals and clinics in Oregon demand management bargain in good faith and settle contracts with union-represented frontline healthcare workers. Doctors, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, nurses, and physician associates from Providence Women’s Clinics, Immediate Care Clinics, St. Vincent and Medford are bargaining first contracts. At the same time, ONA-represented nurses from Providence hospitals including Providence St. Vincent, Newberg, Hood River, Medford, Willamette Falls and Milwaukie have been bargaining for months and will take part in a rare six-table mediation session with management June 4-7.

WHEN/WHERE:   
Thursday, May 30 from 11:00 – 11:45 a.m.  
Providence Park, corner of SW 18th & SW Morrison St., Portland 
(The press conference will be streamed live on ONA’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/OregonNursesAssociation)  

WHO:   
• Virginia Smith, RN, Member of ONA Board of Directors and Chair of ONA’s Providence Willamette Falls Bargaining Unit 
• Dr. Charlie Saltalamacchia, OB/GYN, Providence Women’s Clinic 
• Piper Sullivan, PA-C, Providence Immediate Care Clinic - Sherwood 
• Dr. Jennifer Lincoln, IBCLC, OB Hospitalist, Providence St. Vincent 
• Denise Arnold, RN, Chair of ONA’s Providence Newberg Bargaining Team   
• Gina Ottinger, RN, Secretary of ONA’s Providence St. Vincent Executive Team 
 
WHY:  
Oregon is a hotbed for union organizing and caregivers from Providence facilities are joining in historic numbers. The corporatization of healthcare has left many feeling frustrated and burnt out. They organized to have a voice in institutional decisions that affect patients and caregivers.  

Nurses from six Providence hospitals are joining the physicians and advanced practice providers to call attention to their months-long contract negotiations and announce the results of strike authorization votes. In recent weeks, little movement has been made on the nurses’ top priorities of safe staffing, affordable health care, increased paid time off and market wages. ONA filed ULPs alleging the following: refusal to bargain; bargaining in bad faith; unilateral implementation of mandatory subjects, denial of access to employee representatives and retaliation against union leaders. Next week all six facilities with open contracts will take part in a joint table mediation.   

The Pacific Northwest Hospital Medicine Association (PNWHMA) was created in 2015 as the first hospitalist-specific labor union in the United States. It has since expanded to represent more doctors and advanced practice providers. PNWHMA is affiliated with AFT Healthcare—the fastest-growing healthcare union in the country. AFT Healthcare represents more than 200,000 members in 100 locals in 18 states and territories.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 18,000 nurses, and healthcare professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and health care professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all health care professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org. 
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Media Advisory: Caregivers from Providence Hospitals and Clinics Hold Press Conference May 30 to Demand Management Negotiate Fair Contracts - 05/29/24

WHAT: Caregivers from Providence hospitals and clinics in Oregon demand management bargain in good faith and settle contracts with union-represented frontline healthcare workers. Doctors, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, nurses, and physician associates from Providence Women’s Clinics, Immediate Care Clinics, St. Vincent and Medford are bargaining first contracts. At the same time, ONA-represented nurses from Providence hospitals including Providence St. Vincent, Newberg, Hood River, Medford, Willamette Falls and Milwaukie have been bargaining for months and will take part in a rare six-table mediation session with management June 4-7.

WHEN/WHERE:   
Thursday, May 30 from 11:00 – 11:45 a.m.  
Providence Park, corner of SW 18th & SW Morrison St., Portland 
(The press conference will be streamed live on ONA’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/OregonNursesAssociation)  

WHO:   
• Virginia Smith, RN, Member of ONA Board of Directors and Chair of ONA’s Providence Willamette Falls Bargaining Unit 
• Dr. Charlie Saltalamacchia, OB/GYN, Providence Women’s Clinic 
• Piper Sullivan, PA-C, Providence Immediate Care Clinic - Sherwood 
• Dr. Jennifer Lincoln, IBCLC, OB Hospitalist, Providence St. Vincent 
• Denise Arnold, RN, Chair of ONA’s Providence Newberg Bargaining Team   
• Gina Ottinger, RN, Secretary of ONA’s Providence St. Vincent Executive Team 
 
WHY:  
Oregon is a hotbed for union organizing and caregivers from Providence facilities are joining in historic numbers. The corporatization of healthcare has left many feeling frustrated and burnt out. They organized to have a voice in institutional decisions that affect patients and caregivers.  

Nurses from six Providence hospitals are joining the physicians and advanced practice providers to call attention to their months-long contract negotiations and announce the results of strike authorization votes. In recent weeks, little movement has been made on the nurses’ top priorities of safe staffing, affordable health care, increased paid time off and market wages. ONA filed ULPs alleging the following: refusal to bargain; bargaining in bad faith; unilateral implementation of mandatory subjects, denial of access to employee representatives and retaliation against union leaders. Next week all six facilities with open contracts will take part in a joint table mediation.   

The Pacific Northwest Hospital Medicine Association (PNWHMA) was created in 2015 as the first hospitalist-specific labor union in the United States. It has since expanded to represent more doctors and advanced practice providers. PNWHMA is affiliated with AFT Healthcare—the fastest-growing healthcare union in the country. AFT Healthcare represents more than 200,000 members in 100 locals in 18 states and territories.  

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) represents a diverse community of 18,000 nurses, and healthcare professionals throughout Oregon. Together, we use our collective power to advocate for critical issues impacting patients, nurses, and healthcare professionals including a more effective, affordable and accessible healthcare system; better working conditions for all healthcare professionals; and healthier communities. For more information visit www.OregonRN.org. 
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