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Jesse Brewer, owner of Chiloquin Lawn Care, earned an Award of Merit from an advisory committee to the Oregon Board of Forestry recently.
Jesse Brewer, owner of Chiloquin Lawn Care, earned an Award of Merit from an advisory committee to the Oregon Board of Forestry recently.
Klamath County company earns Award of Merit for fire prevention logging and brush clearance from Oregon Department of Forestry (Photo) - 11/30/22

CHILOQUIN, Ore. – Chiloquin Lawn Care based in Klamath County earned an Award of Merit last month from one of three regional advisory committees to the Oregon Board of Forestry. The same committee awarded the Operator of the Year title for Eastern Oregon to La Grande-based forest consultant Chuck Sarrett of Full Circle Consulting. F and B Logging was named Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon and R and R King Logging secured the Southwest Oregon Operator of the Year honors. 

The award program recognizes forest operators who, while harvesting timber or doing other forestry work, protect natural resources at a level that consistently meets or goes above and beyond requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act *. That law requires people to manage forests responsibly and protect streams and water quality, protect and enhance habitat, and reduce landslide risks. The law also requires landowners to replant forests after harvesting. 

Videos about each of the three Operators of the Year and three Merit Award winners can be viewed on the ODF website at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/default.aspx

Jesse Brewer owns Chiloquin Lawn Care. After wildfires around Chiloquin threatened many of his neighbors’ properties, he invested in brush-removal equipment and began helping small landowners in rural Klamath County remove overgrown brush. 

Natural Resource Specialist Jennifer Case works out of ODF’s Klamath Falls office. She said, “Jesse’s work has reduced fire danger on properties in and around Chiloquin. By reducing overcrowding, he’s made remaining trees healthier and less prone to drought. He was recognized for one particular brush clearance job which also involved protecting an aspen grove for wildlife. He offers an invaluable service for small landowners whose brush removal projects might not be large enough to interest bigger logging firms.” 

ODF Forest Resources Division Chief Josh Barnard said, “The honorees this year innovated to protect water quality, and helped landowners be able to improve the health of their forests and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire through careful management planning. They have shown extraordinary care and diligence in challenging harvesting situations. We’re pleased to recognize the community spirit and leadership these operators have shown.”

Wolfco Timber Services was also recognized this year with an Award of Merit by the Eastern Oregon committee for an economically risky salvage harvest in central Oregon near Sisters in the wake of the devastating Green Ridge Fire.

* Oregon enacted the Forest Practices Act in 1971 as a national model for forest management laws. The law focuses on ensuring responsible forest operations and protecting natural resources in forestland. The Act has been updated many times based on new scientific information and values to create a balanced approach to natural resource management.

                                                        # # #

Forest consultant Chuck Sarrett of Full Circle Consulting has been named 2022 Operator of the Year for Eastern Oregon.
Forest consultant Chuck Sarrett of Full Circle Consulting has been named 2022 Operator of the Year for Eastern Oregon.
La Grande forestry consultant named Operator of the Year by Oregon Department of Forestry (Photo) - 11/30/22

LA GRANDE, Ore. – La Grande-based forestry consultant Chuck Sarrett of Full Circle Consulting has been chosen as Operator of the Year for Eastern Oregon. Sarrett was chosen last month by one of three regional advisory committees to the Oregon Board of Forestry. Two others were chosen for Northwest and Southwest Oregon respectively. The recipients will be recognized in Salem at the January 4 meeting of the Board. The other selected firms are:

  • Northwest Oregon – Mike Falleur of F and B Logging of Warrenton, Ore.
  • Southwest Oregon – Bobby King of R and R King Logging of Florence, Ore.

The award recognizes forest operators who, while harvesting timber or doing other forestry work, protect natural resources at a level that consistently meets or goes above and beyond requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act *. That law requires people to manage forests responsibly and protect streams and water quality, protect and enhance habitat, and reduce landslide risks. The law also requires landowners to replant forests after harvesting. Videos about each of the three Operators of the Year and three Merit Award winners can be viewed on the ODF website at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/default.aspx

Chuck Sarrett has worked for decades in forestry in eastern Oregon, where he was born and raised. After a long career with Boise Cascade, he became a forestry consultant, starting his own firm called Full Circle Consulting. Sarrett came up with a much easier-to-use application to help forest landowners obtain federal assistance grants to manage their forestlands. He has helped scores of landowners develop forest management plans, a pre-requisite for obtaining federal funds. The plans make clear the landowner’s goals for the property, such as improving grazing, generating future income or enhancing wildlife habitat. In addition, he helps connect landowners with logging firms to carry out the work. In many cases he oversees the work at the request of the landowner, helping them improve the health and beauty of their forest and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire. He has also helped mentor and train others to become forest consultants, who are scarce in northeast Oregon.

“Chuck is well respected and liked by the landowners in and around Union County,” said ODF Stewardship Forester Travis Lowe, who works with Sarrett in the Northeast Oregon District. “His depth of knowledge and experience about what makes forests in northeast Oregon healthy helps him write management plans that leave the lands he consults about at less at risk from catastrophic wildfire, pests and diseases.”

ODF Forest Resources Division Chief Josh Barnard said, “The honorees this year innovated to protect water quality, and helped landowners be able to improve the health of their forests and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire through careful management planning. They have shown extraordinary care and diligence in challenging harvesting situations. We’re pleased to recognize the community spirit and leadership these operators have shown.”

Two other companies were recognized with an Award of Merit this year for harvests in eastern Oregon. They are:

  • Chiloquin Lawn Care for helping small landowners in rural Klamath County remove overgrown brush to reduce fire danger on their property while protecting an aspen grove for wildlife.
  • Wolfco Timber Services for an economically risky salvage harvest near Sisters in the wake of the devastating Green Ridge Fire.

* Oregon enacted the Forest Practices Act in 1971 as a national model for forest management laws. The law focuses on ensuring responsible forest operations and protecting natural resources in forestland. The Act has been updated many times based on new scientific information and values to create a balanced approach to natural resource management.

                                                        # # #

Bobby King of R and R Logging based in Florence has been named 2022 Operator of the Year for Southwest Oregon.
Bobby King of R and R Logging based in Florence has been named 2022 Operator of the Year for Southwest Oregon.
Florence logging firm named Operator of the Year for Southwest Oregon by the Oregon Department of Forestry (Photo) - 11/30/22

FLORENCE, Ore. – R and R King Logging based in Florence, Ore., has been chosen as Operator of the Year for Southwest Oregon by one of three regional advisory committees to the Oregon Board of Forestry. The Regional Forest Practices Committee for Southwest Oregon selected the firm last month. Owner Bobby King and two other recipients representing Northwest and Eastern Oregon will be recognized in Salem at the January 4 meeting of the Board. The other selected firms are:

  • Eastern Oregon – Chuck Sarrett of Full Circle Consulting of La Grande, Ore.
  • Northwest Oregon – Mike Falleur of F and B Logging of Warrenton, Ore.

The award recognizes forest operators who, while harvesting timber or doing other forestry work, protect natural resources at a level that consistently meets or goes above and beyond requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act *. That law requires people to manage forests responsibly and protect streams and water quality, protect and enhance habitat, and reduce landslide risks. The law also requires landowners to replant forests after harvesting. 

Bobby King of R and R King Logging in Florence comes from a logging family and has worked for more than 30 years protecting natural resources during harvests. He is often called upon by landowners to tackle difficult harvests in the steep terrain of the southern Oregon Coast Range. He was nominated for work he did protecting water quality in a forest unit that was bounded by a fish-bearing stream and a meandering tidal slough. He used a drone to string yarding cables from a high point across the slough, allowing him to hoist logs above the protected trees buffering the slough and creek without damaging any. He also succeeded in logging around a stand of trees along a strip of neighboring land without damaging those. 

Jon Laine, ODF Stewardship Forester who inspected the harvest unit, said King and his crew’s experience helped them also protect soils and keep neighbors happy. “They have the expertise and know how to take on these challenging projects and protect nearby waters and the land,” said Laine.

Strain Excavating and Trucking of Coos Bay earned an Award of Merit from the selection committee for replacing a failing tube culvert with a larger box culvert that opened up on Weyerhaeuser land about three miles of habitat for native cutthroat trout that had not been reachable by fish for more than 50 years. 

ODF Forest Resources Division Chief Josh Barnard said, “The honorees this year innovated to protect water quality, and helped landowners be able to improve the health of their forests and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire through careful management planning. They have shown extraordinary care and diligence in challenging harvesting situations. We’re pleased to recognize the community spirit and leadership these operators have shown.”

Videos about each of the three Operators of the Year and three Merit Award winners can be viewed on the ODF website at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/default.aspx

Eastern Oregon

Chuck Sarrett has worked for decades in forestry in eastern Oregon, where he was born and raised. After a long career with Boise Cascade, he became a forestry consultant, starting his own firm called Full Circle Consulting. Sarrett came up with a much easier-to-use application to help forest landowners obtain federal assistance grants to manage their forestlands. He has helped scores of landowners develop forest management plans, a pre-requisite for obtaining federal funds. The plans make clear the landowner’s goals for the property, such as improving grazing, generating future income or enhancing wildlife habitat. In addition, he helps connect landowners with logging firms to carry out the work. In many cases he oversees the work at the request of the landowner, helping them improve the health and beauty of their forest and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire. He has also helped mentor and train others to become forest consultants, who are scarce in northeast Oregon.

“Chuck is well respected and liked by the landowners in and around Union County,” said ODF Stewardship Forester Travis Lowe, who works with Sarrett in the Northeast Oregon District. “His depth of knowledge and experience about what makes forests in northeast Oregon healthy helps him write management plans that leave the lands he consults about at less at risk from catastrophic wildfire, pests and diseases.”

Northwest Oregon

Clatsop County-based logger Mike Falleur logs in the north Coast Range. Rainfall in the county averages 87 inches a year, about twice the amount that falls on Portland. Falleur was honored for protecting streams against sediment from clearcuts by an elaborate system of settling ponds and pumps. The pumps spread rain runoff onto the forest floor where vegetation can trap dirt and debris and keep it out of streams. 

“Controlling runoff protects water quality for drinking water and fish that live in the streams,”  said retired ODF Stewardship Forester Ashley Lertora, who nominated Falleur for Operator of the Year. “Mike is very conscientious about protecting water quality and makes pre-harvesting site visits to carefully plan how to manage runoff from the site. There’s never an issue because of that.”

Merit Awards were also given to two eastern Oregon companies.

  • Chiloquin Lawn Care for helping small landowners in rural Klamath County remove overgrown brush to reduce fire danger on their property and improve forest health while protecting an aspen grove for wildlife.
  • Wolfco Timber Services for an economically risky salvage harvest near Sisters, Ore. in the wake of the devastating Green Ridge Fire.

* Oregon enacted the Forest Practices Act in 1971 as a national model for forest management laws. The law focuses on ensuring responsible forest operations and protecting natural resources in forestland. The Act has been updated many times based on new scientific information and values to create a balanced approach to natural resource management.

                                                        # # #

Clatsop County-based logger Mike Falleur and his F and B Logging firm have been recognized as 2022 Operator of the Year for Oregon.
Clatsop County-based logger Mike Falleur and his F and B Logging firm have been recognized as 2022 Operator of the Year for Oregon.
Clatsop County logging firm is named Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon by the Oregon Department of Forestry (Photo) - 11/30/22

WARRENTON, Ore. – F and B Logging based in Warrenton, Ore., has been chosen as Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon by one of three regional advisory committees to the Oregon Board of Forestry. The Regional Forest Practices Committee for Northwest Oregon selected the firm last month. F and B’s owner, Mike Falleur, will be recognized along with two other recipients representing Southwest and Eastern Oregon in Salem at the January 4 meeting of the Board. The other selected firms are:

  • Eastern Oregon – Chuck Sarrett of Full Circle Consulting of La Grande, Ore.
  • Southwest Oregon – R and R Logging of Florence, Ore.

The award recognizes forest operators who, while harvesting timber or doing other forestry work, protect natural resources at a level that consistently meets or goes above and beyond requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act *. That law requires people to manage forests responsibly and protect streams and water quality, protect and enhance habitat, and reduce landslide risks. The law also requires landowners to replant forests after harvesting. 

Videos about each of the three Operators of the Year and three Merit Award winners can be viewed on the ODF website at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/default.aspx

ODF Forest Resources Division Chief Josh Barnard said, “The honorees this year innovated to protect water quality, and helped landowners be able to improve the health of their forests and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire through careful management planning. They have shown extraordinary care and diligence in challenging harvesting situations. We’re pleased to recognize the community spirit and leadership these operators have shown.”

Clatsop County-based logger Mike Falleur logs in the north Coast Range. Rainfall in the county averages 87 inches a year, about twice the amount that falls on Portland. Falleur was honored for protecting streams against sediment from clearcuts by an elaborate system of settling ponds and pumps. The pumps spread rain runoff onto forest vegetation to trap dirt and debris and keep it out of streams. 

“Controlling runoff protects water quality for drinking water and fish that live in the streams,”  said retired ODF Stewardship Forester Ashley Lertora, who nominated Falleur for Operator of the Year. “Mike is very conscientious about protecting water quality and makes pre-harvesting site visits to carefully plan how to manage runoff from the site. There’s never an issue because of that.”

Eastern Oregon

Chuck Sarrett has worked for decades in forestry in eastern Oregon, where he was born and raised. After a long career with Boise Cascade, he became a forestry consultant, starting his own firm called Full Circle Consulting. Sarrett came up with a much easier-to-use application to help forest landowners obtain federal assistance grants to manage their forestlands. He has helped scores of landowners develop forest management plans, a pre-requisite for obtaining federal funds. In addition, he has helped connect landowners with logging firms to carry out the work and in many cases he oversees the work at the request of the landowner. He has also helped mentor and train others to become forest consultants, who are scarce in northeast Oregon.

“Chuck is well respected and liked by the landowners in and around Union County,” said ODF Stewardship Forester Travis Lowe, who works with Chuck in the Northeast Oregon District. “His depth of knowledge and experience about what makes forests in northeast Oregon healthy helps him write management plans that leave the lands he consults about at less at risk from catastrophic wildfire, pests and diseases.”

Southwest Oregon

Bobby King of R and R King Logging in Florence comes from a logging family. He is often called upon by landowners to tackle difficult harvests in the steep terrain of the southern Oregon Coast Range. He was nominated for work he did protecting water quality in a forest unit that was bounded by a fish-bearing stream and a meandering tidal slough. Running logging cables from a high point across the slough allowed him to hoist logs above the protected trees buffering the slough and creek without damaging any. He also succeeded in logging around a stand of trees along a strip of neighboring land without damaging those. 

Jon Laine, ODF Stewardship Forester who inspected the harvest unit, said King and his crew’s experience helped them also protect soils and keep neighbors happy. “They have the expertise and know how to take on these challenging projects and protect nearby waters and the land,” said Laine.

Merit Awards were also given to two eastern Oregon companies and a Reedsport-based logging firm.

  • Chiloquin Lawn Care for helping small landowners remove overgrown brush to reduce fire danger on their property while protecting an aspen grove for wildlife.
  • Wolfco Timber Services for an economically risky salvage harvest in the wake of the devastating Green Ridge Fire* Oregon enacted the Forest Practices Act in 1971 as a national model for forest management laws. The law focuses on ensuring responsible forest operations and protecting natural resources in forestland. The Act has been updated many times based on new scientific information and values to create a balanced approach to natural resource management.

                                                        # # #

Mike Falleur of F and B Logging based in Warrenton is 2022 Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon.
Mike Falleur of F and B Logging based in Warrenton is 2022 Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon.
Oregon Department of Forestry announces state's top forest operators for 2022 (Photo) - 11/30/22

SALEM, Ore. – Two loggers and a forestry consultant have been chosen as Operator of the Year for their respective region of Oregon. Three regional advisory committees to the Oregon Board of Forestry selected the trio last month. The recipients will be recognized in Salem at the January 4 meeting of the Board. The selected firms are:

  • Eastern Oregon – Chuck Sarrett of Full Circle Consulting of La Grande, Ore.
  • Northwest Oregon – Mike Falleur of F and B Logging of Warrenton, Ore.
  • Southwest Oregon – Bobby King of R and R King Logging of Florence, Ore.

The award recognizes forest operators who, while harvesting timber or doing other forestry work, protect natural resources at a level that consistently meets or goes above and beyond requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act *. That law requires people to manage forests responsibly and protect streams and water quality, protect and enhance habitat, and reduce landslide risks. The law also requires landowners to replant forests after harvesting. Videos about each of the three Operators of the Year and three Merit Award winners can be viewed on the ODF website at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/default.aspx

Eastern Oregon

Chuck Sarrett has worked for decades in forestry in eastern Oregon, where he was born and raised. After a long career with Boise Cascade, he became a forestry consultant, starting his own firm called Full Circle Consulting. Sarrett came up with a much easier-to-use application to help forest landowners obtain federal assistance grants to manage their forestlands. He has helped scores of landowners develop forest management plans, a pre-requisite for obtaining federal funds. The plans make clear the landowner’s goals for the property, such as improving grazing, generating future income or enhancing wildlife habitat. In addition, he helps connect landowners with logging firms to carry out the work. In many cases he oversees the work at the request of the landowner, helping them improve the health and beauty of their forest and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire. He has also helped mentor and train others to become forest consultants, who are scarce in northeast Oregon.

“Chuck is well respected and liked by the landowners in and around Union County,” said ODF Stewardship Forester Travis Lowe, who works with Chuck in the Northeast Oregon District. “His depth of knowledge and experience about what makes forests in northeast Oregon healthy helps him write management plans that leave the lands he consults about at less at risk from catastrophic wildfire, pests and diseases.”

Northwest Oregon

Clatsop County-based logger Mike Falleur logs in the north Coast Range. Rainfall in the county averages 87 inches a year, about twice the amount that falls on Portland. Falleur was honored for protecting streams against sediment from clearcuts by an elaborate system of settling ponds and pumps. The pumps spread rain runoff onto vegetation on the forest floor so it can trap dirt and debris and keep it out of streams. 

“Controlling runoff protects water quality for drinking water and fish that live in the streams,”  said retired ODF Stewardship Forester Ashley Lertora, who nominated Falleur for Operator of the Year. “Mike is very conscientious about protecting water quality and makes pre-harvesting site visits to carefully plan how to manage runoff from the site. There’s never an issue because of that.”

Southwest Oregon

Bobby King of R and R King Logging in Florence comes from a logging family and has more than 30 years of doing great work protecting natural resources. He is often called upon by landowners to tackle difficult harvests in the steep terrain of the southern Oregon Coast Range. He was nominated for work he did protecting water quality in a forest unit that was bounded by a fish-bearing stream and a meandering tidal slough. Using a drone to run yarding cables from a high point across the slough allowed him to hoist logs above the protected trees buffering the slough and creek without damaging any. He also succeeded in logging around a stand of trees along a strip of neighboring land without damaging those. 

Jon Laine, ODF Stewardship Forester who inspected the harvest unit, said King and his crew’s experience helped them also protect soils and keep neighbors happy. “They have the expertise and know how to take on these challenging projects and protect nearby waters and the land,” said Laine.

Merit Awards were also given to three other companies.

Eastern Oregon

  • Chiloquin Lawn Care for helping small landowners in Klamath County remove overgrown brush to reduce fire danger on their property while protecting an aspen grove for wildlife.
  • Wolfco Timber Services for an economically risky salvage harvest near Sisters, Ore., in the wake of the devastating Green Ridge Fire.

Southwest Oregon

  • Strain Excavating and Trucking of Coos Bay for replacing a failing tube culvert with a larger box culvert that opened up about three miles of habitat on Weyerhaeuser land for native cutthroat trout that had not been reachable by fish for more than 50 years.

ODF Forest Resources Division Chief Josh Barnard said, “The honorees this year innovated to protect water quality, and helped landowners be able to improve the health of their forests and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire through careful management planning. They have shown extraordinary care and diligence in challenging harvesting situations. We’re pleased to recognize the community spirit and leadership these operators have shown.”

* Oregon enacted the Forest Practices Act in 1971 as a national model for forest management laws. The law focuses on ensuring responsible forest operations and protecting natural resources in forestland. The Act has been updated many times based on new scientific information and values to create a balanced approach to natural resource management.

                                                         # # #

Oregon grant program aims to reduce wildfire risk, protect lives and property - 11/28/22

SALEM, Ore.—A $20 million landscape resiliency grant program is making Oregon’s landscapes more resistant to the threat of wildfire by treatments done through unique partnerships with private landowners and other local, county, state, and federal agencies.

Oregon’s 2021 Legislature invested nearly $195 million to address Oregon’s wildfire crisis through Senate Bill 762. Of this $195 million, $20 million created a two-year landscape resiliency and mitigation grant program that the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has been administering. 

“Projects like this are a major step towards protecting communities and natural resources in Oregon by making forests healthier and more resilient in the face of changing climate and wildfire environment,” said Cal Mukumoto, Oregon’s State Forester,” said Cal Mukumoto, Oregon’s State Forester.

 Just over 200,000 acres of Oregon landscapes are planned to be treated by June 2023 when the program ends. These projects in some of the highest-risk landscapes will greatly reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire in those treated areas. Not only will it make the forestland around communities and resources safer, but it will also encourage forest health, resiliency, ecosystem health, and shared stewardship. 

Recently, a small group of experts that helped ODF design project criteria met on a cold sunny day in Sisters to see this program unfold.

“We went to see five different projects—five different stories of what landscape resiliency looks like,” said Jeff Burns, ODF’s All Lands Initiatives Unit Manager. “These five projects boasted just shy of 2,000 acres of fuels mitigation and resiliency work. However, the real highlight of the tour was the focus on what our partnerships and relationships can achieve together. The support and collaboration of these diverse groups are key to the success of getting this work done on the ground in such a short period of time.”

The tour highlighted innovative technology such as air curtain burners, fuels mitigation creating in-stream habitat, fuels reduction with an element of wildlife habitat management, slash burning, and mastication groundwork. 

Some of the projects visited included: 

  • The Upper Deschutes Watershed Council removed trees on 58 acres that provided approximately 750 trees to be used for in-stream work and habitat restoration.
  • The Ponderosa Land & Cattle Company project that included 727 acres of roadside brushing, thinning, mowing and mastication for fuel breaks. It also treated 590 acres of unit mowing, mastication, thinning and ladder fuels.
  • The Black Butte Ranch project highlighted the use of an air curtain burner that can be used to dispose debris from their project of 79 acres of roadside brushing, thinning, stump grinding, limb removal, and mastication. Two other private landowners had projects concentrated on thinning and pruning pine trees, removal of juniper, mastication of ladder fuels such as bitterbrush, and burn piles. 
  • The Ludwick Property Project treated 170 acres
  • The Glynn Property Project treated 200 acres.

“Access to programs like this enable ODF to work closely with our public and private partners to support communities, local economies, and natural resources while making them safer from wildfires,” Burns said. “At the end of these projects, we hope we can show a level of success that will encourage future funding for this type of work.”

For more information visit ODF’s Landscape Resiliency Grant Program website.

East winds drive several fires on state, private ground in Clatsop County - 11/18/22

Friday a.m. update - Several fires on state and private industrial forestland in Clatsop County resulting from escaped burn piles and driven by east winds have resulted in Level 3 evacuations of four homes and a limited road closure.

The largest of the fires, the 98 Delta Fire, is about 140 acres and located approximately 10 miles east of Gearhart. It started on private forestland and burned onto state forestland. The Level 3 evacuation covers four homes at the end of Saddle Mountain County Road. Saddle Mountain County Road is closed at the intersection of Wawa Mainline Road.

Several other small fires on state and private forestland are controlled or mostly controlled. Firefighters are contending with 15-25 mph east winds and gusts up to 50 mph. They’re currently working to establish holding lines on the east, north and south flanks.

A Type 3 incident management team is in place, with aerial resources, hand crews and additional engines en route.

Board of Forestry to meet in Seaside on Nov. 16, host field tour on Nov. 17 -- Amended agenda - 11/14/22

UPDATE — The Oregon Board of Forestry will be extending the time allotted for public comment during its Nov. 16 meeting in Seaside, OR, due to the high volume of Oregonians who signed up to speak to the board on a variety of topics. The meeting will now start at 8:30 a.m. at the Seaside Civic & Convention Center. View the amended agenda for the meeting. 

Additionally, the board has tentatively scheduled an executive session following conclusion of the meeting to consult with counsel concerning current litigation or litigation likely to be filed, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(h). No decisions will be made during executive session. Members of the media who are interested in attending the executive session need to contact Jason Cox, public affairs officer, at jason.r.cox@odf.oregon.gov for details.

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet for a hybrid public meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 8:30 9 a.m. in Seaside, with a social in the evening and a field tour the following day. The public can attend in-person at Seaside Civic & Convention Center, Riverside Room, 415 1st Avenue, Seaside, OR 97138 or observe the livestream on the department’s YouTube page. The field tour on Nov. 17 is organized to be held on location with no virtual access. The tour itinerary will be released before the event and recordings will be available post-tour.

The board’s business agenda includes:

  • State Forests Endangered Species Management Plan for marbled murrelets
  • *Adoption of Certified Burn Manager rules
  • Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee testimony
  • Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan outcomes
  • State forests branding
  • Fire season summary
  • Macias Gini O’Connell Implementation Management Plan progress

View the agenda for the meeting, social and tour details. 

On Nov. 16, the department will host an evening community social. This informal event is open to the public and can attend in-person at the Seaside Civic & Convention Center, Riverside Room, 415 1st Avenue, Seaside, OR 97138. An RSVP is not required, but a courtesy as spacing and parking is limited. RSVP to boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov

On Nov. 17, the board will host a tour that is open to the public. To minimize the number of vehicles traveling in the woods, there are a limited number of seats available for the tour vans.  If you plan to attend the tour, please RSVP by noon on Nov. 14 to boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov. Members of the public will be responsible for providing their own lunch. 

Live testimony is available for item #1 – State forester and board member comments. Sign-up is required and instructions to provide live testimony are available online. Sign-up closes Friday, Nov. 11 at 5 p.m. Written public testimony will also be accepted. Written comments can be submitted before or up to two weeks after the meeting day to boardofforestry@odf.oregon.govwith the appropriate agenda item included with the submission. No testimony will be available for the Certified Burn Manager rulemaking item included on the agenda, it is marked as a work session (*) and not open for public testimony.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.

Committee for Family Forestlands meets Nov. 17 - 11/14/22

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually on Thursday, Nov. 17 from 9 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Forest Resources Division update
  • Small Forestland Owner Office update
  • Seedling update 
  • Update on Northwest Oregon region committee member 
  • Board of Forestry update
  • Update on the changes to the Forest Practices Act
  • Round table discussion

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 24 hours before the meeting by emailing committee.of.family.forestlands@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.

oak_lace_bug_photo_-_C._Buhl.jpg
oak_lace_bug_photo_-_C._Buhl.jpg
Browning leaves on Oregon white oak may be due to damage from the invasive oak lace bug (Photo) - 11/08/22

SALEM, Ore. – A non-native bug is now causing increasing damage to the state’s iconic Oregon white oak trees (Quercus garryana). Although the oak lace bug (Corythucha arcuata) has been in Oregon since 2015, the damage they cause has been particularly noticeable this year. 

Native from southern Canada to the eastern, central and southern U.S., this insect in Oregon is mostly a pest of urban oaks, although it can also infest related trees. Oak lace bug adults are an eighth of an inch long and transparent. They look similar to non-native azalea lace bugs that have been attacking azaleas and rhododendrons in recent years. Lacebugs occur on the undersides of leaves. They suck plant juices from photosynthetic cells that contain chlorophyll and thus cause leaf yellowing. On the underside of yellow-stippled leaves you can see adults, cast skins of nymphs and black droplets of excrement. 

Treatment of this insect is generally not advised because they are typically only an aesthetic pest that is not persistent year after year. Despite damage from this and other foliage pests, white oaks will drop their leaves in the fall and reflush the next year as normal.

It’s fairly common in fall to see yellowing and browning leaves on Oregon white oak. The color change can also be due to normal attacks from other insects, such as gall-making flies and wasps, leaf-mining caterpillars and flies, which come to an end when cold weather arrives. Brown leaves can also be damage from squirrels digging at twig gall grubs. Along with most of our other trees, oaks are also being stressed by ongoing droughts and hot weather. This causes their leaves to turn brown earlier than normal.

 Fertilizing will not “green up” damaged, yellowing or browning leaves and is not advised as it provides more nutrients not only to the tree but also the insects that attack it.  

It should also be noted that this insect can bite although it does not typically do damage beyond a mild sting. Although oak lace bug does not seek out humans specifically, it can fall from trees onto humans and may give a bite as it tests to see if we are suitable hosts, it then becomes disinterested and crawls elsewhere in search of oak leaves. 

Attached Media Files: oak_lace_bug_photo_-_C._Buhl.jpg