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ODF fire update and fire map for Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020 - 09/23/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

 

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

203,685

15%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,828

46%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

27%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,027

31%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

52%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,751

87%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

24%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

80%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

95%

N/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

26%

E of Diamond Lake

More information

Oregon Department of Forestry develops draft Habitat Conservation Plan for western Oregon's state forests - 09/23/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry has developed a draft Habitat Conservation Plan for western Oregon’s state forests, proposing enhanced conservation for threatened and endangered fish and wildlife with increased certainty that counties and rural communities will receive revenues for decades to come.

Covering approximately 639,000 acres of state forestlands west of the Cascades, the draft Habitat Conservation Plan would offer enhanced protections for threatened and endangered fish and wildlife, while ensuring predictable timber revenues to help fund public services in rural communities. An independent analysis found that under the draft HCP, ODF can achieve more certainty in environmental protections as well as timber harvest volume compared to ODF’s current approach to complying with the Endangered Species Act. If an HCP were approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries, ODF would be assured ESA compliance over a 70-year permit term.

The draft plan can be viewed by visiting https://www.oregon.gov/odf/aboutodf/Pages/HCP-initiative.aspx. On October 6, the Board of Forestry is set to vote on whether to advance the project into the National Environmental Policy Act process. Written comment can be submitted to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">boardofforestry@oregon.gov, while information on providing verbal comment will be posted on the Board of Forestry page at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/Pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Lands owned by the Board of Forestry must, by law, provide economic, environmental and social benefits to Oregonians under a concept called Greatest Permanent Value – and to achieve this ODF must comply with the federal Endangered Species Act. At the same time, ODF’s State Forests Division is funded almost entirely on timber sale revenue, and Forest Trust Land counties rely on timber revenue to help fund local services.

As more species become listed as threatened or endangered, this is projected to result in reduced harvest opportunities over time. Additionally, ESA compliance on ODF lands currently costs several million dollars each year, with expenses likely to grow with more listings. The draft HCP takes a holistic approach to protecting and increasing habitat for threatened and endangered species, while assuring a more predictable rate of timber harvest over a 70-year HCP permit term and reducing costs compared to the current site-by-site approach to ESA compliance.

As part of ODF’s commitment to public and stakeholder involvement, ODF hosted six meetings open to the public throughout development of the draft HCP as well as dozens of individual and focus group meetings. Recognizing the unique relationship between ODF and Forest Trust Land counties, ODF has provided updates and solicited input from county representatives at every opportunity provided.

The plan was developed under a Steering Committee and Scoping Team with input from their technical experts that included representatives from the following federal and state agencies U.S. Fish & Wildlife and NOAA Fisheries, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of State Lands, Department of Environmental Quality, and Oregon State University.

ODF fire report for Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020 - 09/22/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,916

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,775

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

       22%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,020

       26%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       44%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,510

       55%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

       22%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       70%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       89%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

       26%

E of Diamond Lake

ODF fire report and fire map for Monday, Sept. 21, 2020 - 09/21/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,647

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,764

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

170,637

       17%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,880

       25%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       41%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,447

       52%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,214 in Oregon

       18%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       65%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       77%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,689

       22%

E of Diamond Lake

More information

ODF's Fire Situation Report and Fire Map for Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020 - 09/20/20

SALEM, Ore - Attached are the Oregon Department of Forestry's map of large fires the agency is tracking in Oregon, along with the Fire Situation Report for Sunday, Sept. 20. The latter has current acres burned and containment levels for 10 current large wildfires in Oregon.

Attached Media Files: 20200920_ODF_sit-report.pdf
ODF's Fire Situation Report and Fire Map for Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020 - 09/19/20

SALEM, Ore - Attached are the Oregon Department of Forestry's map of large fires the agency is tracking in Oregon, along with the Fire Situation Report for Saturday, Sept. 19. The latter has current acres burned and containment levels for 10 current large wildfires in Oregon.

Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
ODF fire report for Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 (Photo) - 09/18/20

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestery is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Echo Mountain and the North Cascade complexes were removed from today’s report. Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are more than 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

192,719

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,012

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

172,510

10%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,865

10%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

130,429

25%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

41,395 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,833

35%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

37%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,995

15%

E of Diamond Lake

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information

Don't be taken in by online donation scams related to the wildfires - 09/17/20

OREGON CITY, Ore. - Personnel assigned to the Clackamas County Fires have been receiving word of individuals requesting or raising funds on social media outlets for Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) firefighters working on various fires in the area. All wildland firefighter personnel assigned to the Clackamas County Fires (which include those based out of Molalla) are supported by an incident management team that provides food, shelter and necessary supplies for these firefighters.

The public is cautioned to avoid scams on social media from those requesting money supposedly to support firefighters working on the many wildfires in the county. Scammers will use certain geographic or information cues to lure in unsuspecting donors with good intentions.

Due to the complexity of the wildfire situation in Northwest Oregon, individual fires, outposts, and field units supporting assigned firefighter personnel cannot accept donations of food, money, or other supplies, as they do not have the capability to provide distribution of these goods to the firefighters. Instead, citizens should consider supporting their local volunteer fire departments, or donating to the non-profit Wildland Firefighter Foundation.

If folks are looking to help people recover from wildfires, they should consider reaching out to the local Red Cross unit for the impacted area.

All information on how to help in Clackamas County can be found at: https://www.clackamas.us/wildfires/help.

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Holiday Farm Fire Temporary Suspension of Activity - 09/17/20

Due to forecasted hazardous weather conditions including rain, wind, potential lightning and hail, we will be suspending operations for all utility companies and non-essential people from entering the level 3 evacuation area and all areas within the fire footprint starting at 1800 tonight 9/17 through 9/18 at 1800.  Depending on weather conditions the suspension of activity may be extended in 24-hour increments.

Incident Commanders are concerned about fire weakened trees and rocks falling into the roadway or areas personnel are working. Homeowners who have chosen not to evacuate are directed to remain at home or evacuate during this weather event and not travel the road system within the fire perimeter.  Previously issued road access permits may be temporarily suspended and access denied during these periods.

No utility crews except those directly related to the Highway 126 snagging operation or Leaburg dam operations will be allowed in the fire areas during this time.

We will continue to reevaluate to determine access for the following 24 hours by 1800 each evening thereafter.

The weather may also dictate the number of fire resources assigned to the fire during this weather event.

ODF map of current Oregon wildfires - 09/17/20

SALEM, Ore. - Attached is a map of 12 current Oregon wildfires that the Oregon Department of Forestry. The map includes the largest wildfires currently burning in Oregon.

Oregon Dept. of Forestry Fire Report for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020 - 09/17/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 12 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are about 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Beachie Creek

191,138

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Lionshead

189,316

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Holiday Farm

170,637

8%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

135,956

3%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

128,020

20%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

38,721 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,814

25%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

29%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

8,645

1%

E of Diamond Lake

Echo Mtn. Complex

2,552

45%

4 miles NE of Lincoln City

North Cascade Complex

2,315

  •  

Multiple locations in ODF’s North Cascade District

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information

Once skies over Oregon start to clear, more aircraft will engage on wildfires. Firefighters are asking owners of personal drones to help by keeping their equipment grounded over and around wildfires.
Once skies over Oregon start to clear, more aircraft will engage on wildfires. Firefighters are asking owners of personal drones to help by keeping their equipment grounded over and around wildfires.
Firefighters ask the public to keep personal drones on the ground to enable aircraft to engage on wildfires (Photo) - 09/16/20

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon fire officials are expecting that as visibility improves, a large number of helicopters and planes will soon take flight and start engaging on the many wildfires in the state. They are appealing to  drone enthusiasts to not fly their equipment while skies over Oregon are so busy.

“We’re looking to Oregonians statewide to help us make the most of these resources and ensure our people stay safe by keeping their personal drones on the ground. If you fly, we can’t,” said ODF’s Chief of Fire Protection Doug Grafe.

Grafe said two key ways firefighters use aviation assets is to actively fight fires using water and retardant drops and to provide an aerial view of the fires, especially hidden hot spots that need extinguishing.

 “That aerial view informs our operational decisions and helps us provide accurate information about fire perimeters and activities to the public,” Grafe said.

State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said:, “We appreciate the cooperation from drone hobbyists. By keeping their drones on the ground for the time being, we’ll be able to get our helicopters and planes safely in the air fighting fires.”

Poor visibility over the state from the heavy smoke has prevented firefighting aircraft from fully engaging on wildfires. With forecasts calling for clearer skies in coming days, fire officials say the public should expect to see many more planes and helicopters in and around wildfires, sources of water and airstrips.

                                                                                            # # #

ODF's Fire Situation Report and Fire Map for Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020 - 09/16/20

SALEM, Ore - Attached are the Oregon Department of Forestry's map of large fires the agency is tracking in Oregon, along with the Fire Situation Report for Wednesday, Sept. 16. The latter has current acres burned and containment levels for 12 current large wildfires in Oregon.

Northwest Oregon Area Fire Update for 9-15-2020 - 09/15/20

Forest Grove, Ore. – Firefighters continue to work towards containing a number of fires burning across the Oregon Department of Forestry-Northwest Oregon Area. The Powerline Fire has been returned to the local fire protection district and will no longer be represented on this report.

Pike Road Fire (Tillamook District): 300 acres, 35% contained.

Progress on the fire has been good. Crews are working on mop up throughout the fire area. Level 1 evacuations are in place as of 9/15/2020.

North Cascade Complex. This complex is burning on the North Cascade District. These fires are located near both the Riverside Fire and the Beachie Creek Fire. An incident management organization from North Carolina will be in place beginning tomorrow to assist the district with management of this complex.

Unger Road Fire: 496 acres, 100% lined.

Resources are working on mopping up and removing hazardous snags in the fire area.

Whilhoit Fire: 591 acres, 100% lined. Resources are working on mopping up and removing hazardous snags in the fire area.

Graves Road: 44 acres, 100% lined. Resources are working on mopping up and removing hazardous snags in the fire area.

Dowty Road: 1,452 acres, 30% lined. Resources are working on mopping up and removing hazardous snags in the fire area.

There are a total of 281 personnel working on the North Cascade Complex. Resources are coming from 27 states to assist Oregon in the overall suppression efforts.

The Oregon Department of Forestry would like to remind folks that fire danger across the state remains extreme. Please check fire restrictions and closures prior to heading out.

Northwest Oregon Area Fire Update - 09/14/20

Forest Grove, OR. – Following the historic wind event on September 7, 2020, the Oregon Department of Forestry-Northwest Oregon Area has been actively engaged in several fires. Below is a brief summary of the incidents which are burning throughout the area:

Pike Road Fire (Tillamook District): 300 acres, 35% contained.

Progress on the fire has been good. Crews are working on mop up throughout the fire area. Level 1 and 2 evacuations in place as of 9/13/2020.

Powerline Fire (Forest Grove District): 126 acres, 100% contained.

The Powerline Fire is in patrol status. Mop up operations have been completed and the Forest Grove District has transferred this incident back to the Gaston Rural Fire District.

The Northwest Oregon Area has also been managing a complex of four fires, burning near the Beachie Creek and Riverside fires. These fires have been being managed by local resources, as well as resources from the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal’s Office. These fires have been identified as the North Cascade Complex. This complex is burning on the North Cascade District.

Unger Road Fire: 378 acres, 100% lined.

Resources are working on mopping up and removing hazardous snags in the fire area.

Whilhoit Fire: 592 acres, 100% lined.

Resources have completed line construction and are working on hazard tree/snag removal, as well as mopping up.

Graves Road: 45 acres, 20% lined.

Crews are working on constructing fire line and removing snags that could pose a threat to the fire line.

Dowdy Road: 1,300 acres, 20% lined.

Crews are working on constructing fire line and removing snags that could pose a threat to the fire line.

Members of a Type 2 Incident Management Team from North Carolina have been dispatched to the area and will be integrating with district resources to continue managing and fighting these fires.

People are reminded that fire danger across the state remains extreme. Please check fire restrictions and closures prior to heading out.

State Forests Advisory Committee to meet Sept. 17 - 09/14/20

SALEM, Ore. – An Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) state forests advisory group will meet virtually Thursday, Sept. 17 to hear an update and solicit feedback on the Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Planning process.

The State Forests Advisory Committee will meet 3-5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17, and the meeting will be livestreamed on ODF’s YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/c/oregondepartmentofforestry. The meeting will focus on the HCP conservation strategy, and information set to be presented to the Oregon Board of Forestry in October as part of helping the Board determine whether to move forward with an HCP. The meeting agenda is posted at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/Pages/sfac.aspx.

Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 24 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7427.

SFAC’s role

The State Forests Advisory Committee (SFAC) includes citizens and representatives of timber, environmental and recreation groups. SFAC provides a forum to discuss issues, opportunities and concerns, and offer advice and guidance to ODF on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan. The plan provides guidance for managing 616,000 acres within the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam State Forests, and several scattered state-owned forest tracts in Benton, Polk, Lincoln and Lane counties through a balanced approach to generate revenue while prioritizing environmental and social benefits.

Forestry community pulls together to assist with Washington County fires - 09/14/20

FOREST GROVE, Ore. — This week, forest workers answered the call to add firefighting capacity when it was needed most. With national crews unavailable for smaller fires here in Washington County, resources were critically short – especially crews. The Oregon Department of Forestry put out the call to the forestry community for help and the response was overwhelming. John Ragsdale Logging and Scott Land and Timber assisted firefighters by operating their heavy equipment to build fireline and remove hazard trees. Stimson Lumber Company foresters with fire training and skills banded together to create a company crew and arrived with their company engines; Hampton Lumber joined in as well with their company engines.

Bighorn Logging from Banks joined in and formed a 10 person crew to add capacity. Stimson added to that with a crew from C&H Reforestation. “These are not crews that make a living fighting fire, these are crews that care for our forests, planting trees and managing tree spacing, but they have the skills to help and made the difference on this fire” said Mike Cafferata, District Forester in Forest Grove. Now in the mop-up phase of the incident, they are extinguishing hot spots around the perimeter as we move toward full containment. Soon the fire will be in patrol status which means, working with Gaston Rural Fire District, we will watch this fire until the fall rains have extinguished it completely.

When the Chehalem Mountain Fire needed additional crew capacity, the forestry community dug a little deeper. Weyerhaeuser Company looked farther afield and turned to work crews that accomplish their tree planting and brought 20 crewmembers from Mount St. Helens Reforestation. This added crew capacity enabled the fires to share resources and a crew is now helping Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue secure the Chehalem Mountain Fire, bringing down evacuation levels and advancing the fire towards containment.

We are truly grateful to our forestry partners for answering the call and stepping up to assist during this historic fire event.

Public use closure for ODF-managed state forests extended through Wed., Sept. 16 - 09/14/20

SALEM, Ore. — All Oregon Department of Forestry-managed forests are closed to public use through at least Wed, Sept. 16. Fire danger remains extreme, air quality is bad to hazardous, & last week’s wind storms caused downed trees on roads & other safety problems that need to be cleared. This covers the Tillamook, Clatsop, Gilchrist, Sun Pass & Santiam state forests as well as other smaller parcels managed by ODF in Lane, Douglas, Coos, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Polk, Lincoln, & Benton counties.

ODF appreciates the public's understanding.

Update on Habitat Conservation Plan for western Oregon state forests set for Sept. 16 - 09/11/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry will host a webinar meeting open to the public on Wednesday, Sept. 16 to provide an update and solicit feedback on the Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Planning process.

This meeting will focus on the HCP conservation strategy, and information set to be presented to the Oregon Board of Forestry in October as part of helping the Board determine whether to move forward with an HCP. RSVP is requested. This effort focuses on a potential HCP on state forestlands west of the Cascades and is primarily intended for those with an interest in management of Oregon’s forests.

Date: Wednesday, Sept. 16
Time: 1–3:30 p.m. meeting, followed by informal discussion period to discuss issues of most interest to participants from 3:30-4:30 p.m.
RSVP: Please RSVP
Where: Please see webinar and call-in information below.

  • To view and participate in the webinar from your computer go to https://odf.zoom.us/j/97107098675.
  • For quality audio, please call in from your phone using the following call-in information:
    • Dial: 669-900-6833
    • Meeting ID: 971 0709 8675
  • A post-meeting recording will be posted on the ODF YouTube channel.

The agenda will be posted to the HCP project website, listed below. For more information on the Western Oregon State Forest HCP project, please visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/HCP-initiative.aspx.

Holiday Farm Fire Press Conference Media Advisory - 09/10/20

A press conference on the status of the Holiday Farm Fire will be held Thursday at 5:00 p.m. at Thurston Middle School. Fire and law enforcement officials will brief the media on the status of the fire, evacuation levels, fire area damage assessment plan, road closures and other pertnient information related to the fire. 

Media Advisory - Fire Camp Donations - 09/10/20

URGENT MESSAGE ON DONATIONS:

The Holiday Farm Fire and other wildfire incidents in the region are not able to accept donations.

We’re thankful for all the support and warm thoughts we have received from the community. Our firefighters currently have the support and resources they need. We are unable to take donations of any kind.

If you are looking for ways to assist in the effort, look to local disaster response organizations, such as American Red Cross. There are and will continue to be many displaced residents that will need assistance.

https://www.facebook.com/RedCrossCascades/

State-managed forestland in southwest, eastern Oregon closed - 09/09/20

VENETA, Ore. — State forestland in Lane, Douglas, Coos, Jackson, Josephine, and Klamath counties are closed to public entry and use until further notice.

This includes the Gilchrist and Sun Pass state forests in Klamath County. Closure is necessary due to the current extreme fire conditions that are endangering life, forest resources, and property as well as very limited fire and emergency response resources.

This move means that all lands managed by the Oregon Department of Forestry are closed to public use. It also includes the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam state forests and other ODF-managed forestlands in Lane, Douglas, Coos, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Polk, Lincoln, & Benton counties. The Santiam State Forest is closed until further notice. Other closures in northwest Oregon will last until at least Sunday, Sept. 13 at 11 p.m.

All northwest Oregon state-managed forests closed to public use - 09/09/20

SALEM, Ore. — The Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam state forests are closed to all public entry and use effective immediately, as are scattered state forestlands in Polk, Lincoln and Benton counties. Anyone currently in these areas needs to leave right away.

This is necessary due to the current extreme fire conditions that are endangering life, forest resources, and property as well as very limited fire and emergency response resources.

The Santiam State Forest is closed until further notice. Other closures will last until at least Sunday, Sept. 13 at 11 p.m.

Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual public meeting on September 9 - 09/08/20

SALEM, Ore.—The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, September 9. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on physical distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, this will be a virtual public meeting.

The meeting agenda has been revised based on the level of fire emergency around the state and now includes:

  • Fire Season Update

View the agenda for additional topics to be discussed at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

The meeting will be livestreamed.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.

State forests in NW Oregon moving to extreme fire danger; additional public use restrictions in place - 09/06/20

SALEM, Ore. — With a Red Flag Warning in the forecast, state-managed forests in northwest Oregon will be in Extreme Fire Danger as of Monday morning. Campers are encouraged to leave during that time, and visitors should consider delaying their trip until fire danger moderates. Strong winds, high temperatures and dry conditions are predicted early in the week.

Starting Monday, visitors to state-managed forests in northwest Oregon can expect more public use restrictions, such as a ban on off-highway vehicle use, limited or no campfire opportunities, and more forest roads closed to vehicle traffic. This includes the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam state forests as well as smaller tracts of state forestland in Polk, Lincoln, Benton, and Columbia counties. Restrictions specific to a particular area can be found on the ODF website at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/pages/restrictions.aspx.

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for northwest Oregon and southwest Washington starting 11 a.m. Monday through 8 p.m. Wednesday, indicating critical fire conditions. The NWS is predicting a strong east wind event starting Monday and continuing through at least Tuesday night. East winds and dry conditions in late summer historically have resulted in some of northwest Oregon’s largest wildfires. If possible, the Oregon Department of Forestry recommends that visitors delay their trip to state forests until these conditions subside, likely later in the week.

Precautions such as these can prevent most wildfires:

  • Check current fire restrictions for the area before visiting: Restrictions on activities such as building campfires and riding off-highway vehicles are often in place in cases of extreme fire danger.
  • Check your vehicle for dragging tow chains that can send sparks into roadside vegetation.
  • Don’t park or idle on dry grass or brush – the hot exhaust system can set it smoldering in seconds.
  • Smoke only in an enclosed vehicle. Properly dispose of cigarette butts.
  • If you see smoke, call 911.
  • Always have fire extinguishing tools on hand.

Grizzly Creek Fire Update for Sept. 5, 2020 - 09/05/20

ROGUE VALLEY, ORE. – At 6 a.m. this morning, the Oregon Department of Forestry – Southwest Oregon District (ODFSWO) completed a dozer line around the Grizzly Creek Fire. The line has been reinforced with hose lines to aid in containment efforts. The Day Shift team, consisting of approximately 150 personnel, seven (7) crews, nine (9) engines, four (4) dozers, five (5) water tenders, and 7 helicopters, have held the fire at 340 acres.

Smoke conditions in the Southwest Oregon region is expected to intensify until 8 p.m. tonight. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has issued an Air Quality Advisory, which will be in effect until 5 a.m. Sunday (September 6, 2020). Those who are unusually sensitive to air pollutions may be affected and are advised to limit outdoor activities.  

Quick Facts:

Fire Name: Grizzly Creek Fire

Size: 340 acres

Containment: 7%

Start Date & Time: 9/04/2020, 2:25pm

Location: 1 Mile North of Howard Prairie Lake

Evacuation Level: Level 2 (Bet Set)

Cause: Under Investigation

Personnel: Approx. 150

Crews: 7

Engines: 9

Dozers: 4

Tenders: 5

Helicopters: 7

Structure Threatened: 10

Meadows Fire - 100% Lined, Mop-Up In-Progress - 09/04/20


Oregon Department of Forestry

Southwest Oregon District

5286 Table Rock Rd.
Central Point, OR  97502

(541) 664-3328

 


Contact:

Kyle Novy-Riley, Public Affairs Officer

541-890-9424

Kyle.Novy-Riley@Oregon.Gov

https://SWOFire.com

 

NEWS RELEASE                                                                     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

 September 4, 2020

Meadows Fire

100% Lined, Mop-Up In-Progress

ROGUE VALLEY, ORE. – Local residents called in a “Human Caused” fire at 12:40 a.m. in Sams Valley: eight (8) miles Southwest of Shady Cove. The Oregon Department of Forestry – Southwest Oregon District (ODF-SWO) responded with five (5) engines, two (2) hand crews, one (1) dozer, and three (3) water tenders. There was approximately forty-five (45) ODF-SWO personnel on scene. Jackson County Fire District No. 3 also responded with one (1) engine and one (1) water tender. A preliminary investigation reveals that a down powerline is the cause of the four (4) acre fire. 

Rogue Valley is in a fire weather “Red Flag Warning” today and into Labor Day weekend: triple digit heat, low humidity, and gusty winds. The risk of large costly fires is high. With 96% of Southwest Oregon's fires being Human Caused this season, ODF asks that the public exercise extreme caution and follow local fire restrictions, Southwest Oregon is currently in “Extreme.”

 

 

Fire Name

Meadows

Size

4 Acres

Containment %

100% Contained, Mop-up in progress

Start Date & Time

12:40 am, 9/4/2020

Location

Sams Valley (8 Miles Southwest of Shady Cove) / Block 14000 of Meadows Road

Expected Weather

Triple Digit Heat, Low Humidity, Gusty Winds

Cause

Human Caused (Under Investigation)

Personnel

Approx. 45

Crews

2

Engines

5

Dozers

1

Tenders

3

Structure Task Forces

Fire District 3 was on scene with 1 engine and 1 water tender

 

###

 

Attached Media Files: PDF , WORD
High fire danger likely to trigger temporary road closures in Tillamook State Forest - 09/03/20

FOREST GROVE, Ore. — With high fire danger levels in the Tillamook State Forest, several forest roads off of Highway 26 and Highway 6 will likely be temporarily closed to drive-in access.

Starting Friday, Sept. 4, gates on the North Fork of Wolf Creek Road, McGregor Road and Music Road will temporarily close until the fire danger level drops back to moderate. These newly-installed fire protection gates are designed to restrict drive-in access during periods of high or extreme fire danger to reduce human-caused wildfires on state forestlands. So far in 2020, 79 percent of fires on ODF-protected lands were human-caused. Walk-in access for hunting or other recreational activities will still be allowed.

Gates on Highway 6 at Storeyburn Road, Drift Creek Road and Idiot Creek Road will likely remain open through the Labor Day weekend, but may close sooner if there’s fire activity in the area or fire danger levels rise.

 “Hot and dry weather has significantly increased the risk of wildfire, and firefighting resources are spread thin already,” ODF Forest Grove District Forester Mike Cafferata said. “Please help protect the Tillamook State Forest by respecting these temporary closures.”

For more information, contact the ODF Forest Grove District Office at 503-357-2191.

Firefighters have been busy fighting fires in Oregon and are hoping humans will be careful not to start any new fires over Labor Day weekend.
Firefighters have been busy fighting fires in Oregon and are hoping humans will be careful not to start any new fires over Labor Day weekend.
Labor Day weekend is a risky time for human-caused fires (Photo) - 09/03/20

SALEM, Ore. - Labor Day weekend is a traditional time to head outdoors. The fire prevention organization Keep Oregon Green, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Oregon State Fire Marshal, and local fire agencies statewide want Oregonians to be aware large fires in Oregon have started during this time, threatening communities and Oregon’s forests.

“The Oregon Department of Forestry and our private forest landowners, federal, tribal and local partners statewide have been working especially hard this summer to quickly catch fire starts, particularly in areas near where people live and work,” said ODF Chief of Fire Protection Doug Grafe. “So far we’ve had good success at keeping most fires small. But high to extreme fire danger continues into September, a time when we often see fire starts because of human activity.”

State Fire Marshal Jim Walker said, “Through the Labor Day weekend, we are expecting warming and drying conditions that create a potential for large and costly fires. We are asking all Oregonians to support their local fire service and all wildland firefighters by taking every precaution to prevent accidental fire starts that could easily escalate to a larger wildfire.”

Oregon’s forests have been overrun with crowds this summer seeking. Some are discovering Oregon instead of traveling out-of-state during a pandemic. Other just want some fresh air and scenery after being cooped up at home with family or roommates.

When established campgrounds are full, people have resorted to camping in dispersed areas with no designated fire pits.

Keep Oregon Green President Kristin Babbs says that hundreds of abandoned campfires have been found still burning or smoldering at dispersed camping sites across the state.

“Campfires pose a major threat of new wildfires this time of year as it only takes one spark landing in dry grass to start a wildfire,” Babbs says. 

Regardless of your weekend plans, Babbs says it is important to know the current fire restrictions in effect before leaving home.  All public fire restrictions can be found online at https://gisapps.odf.oregon.gov/firerestrictions/PFR.html.

Many private or large landowners may have further restrictions or complete closures in place on their land due to the fire danger.  Babbs recommends before you head to the great outdoors that you contact the owner of the land where you plan to recreate for any additional closure information.                                                                                                             

                                                                            # # #

 

Visitors to Green Peter Lake will continue to see firefighters working to mop up an 18-acre fire in thick timber on a peninsula in the lake, which is about 12 miles from Sweet Home.
Visitors to Green Peter Lake will continue to see firefighters working to mop up an 18-acre fire in thick timber on a peninsula in the lake, which is about 12 miles from Sweet Home.
Firelines completed around all sides of the wildfire at Green Peter Lake (Photo) - 09/02/20

SWEET HOME, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestry firefighters have finished a fireline around all sides of the Green Peter Peninsula Fire in Linn County and have laid firehoses to all those lines to aid in mopping up hotspots. About 25 firefighters are expected to continue working through the weekend to deepen their fire lines as they mop up the interior of the fire. More accurate mapping has revealed the fire's size to be just under 18 acres. 

Tomorrow (Thursday, Sept. 3) the Whitcomb Creek County Park and its boat ramp will reopen to the public in time to enjoy for the Labor Day weekend. People planning to visit the area are advised that there will still be occasional fire traffic in the park, both on roads and at the boat ramp. Visitors may also see some lingering smoke rising from the fire interior for days to come.

The fire started Sunday, Aug. 30 in heavy timber in a roadless peninsula managed by the Cascade Field Office of the BLM's Northwest Oregon District. The peninsula in at the eastern end of Green Peter Lake about 12 miles northeast of Sweet Home.There has been no forward growth on the fire since Monday morning, Aug. 31. 

 

Absent lightning, human activity becomes the main cause of wildfires, as was the case with the Sweet Creek Milepost 2 Fire. Picture shows smoke from that fire rising in burning forestland near the Siuslaw River in Lane County.
Absent lightning, human activity becomes the main cause of wildfires, as was the case with the Sweet Creek Milepost 2 Fire. Picture shows smoke from that fire rising in burning forestland near the Siuslaw River in Lane County.
Early September heat wave signals renewed fire danger (Photo) - 09/01/20

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon will face extremely hot weather for the next few weeks, including the coast. Wildfire managers are concerned about this forecast. The return of high temperatures, low humidity and east winds can turbocharge even the smallest fire start. A smoldering campfire or an errant spark from a vehicle can become a raging blaze in minutes. And this at a time when firefighting resources are already strained in Oregon and nationally.

The last three weeks have been extremely challenging for wildland and structural firefighters. They have been working long hours in the heat for weeks at a time in an effort to contain the spread of the state’s current wildfires and keep communities safe. Many people across the state have had to evacuate or feared they might have to. And the threat isn’t over.

While the threat from dry lightning in Oregon lessens after August, human activity again becomes the chief cause of fires. So whether this September hot spell spawns new wildfires depends almost entirely on how Oregonians behave in the forest. Taking a few extra precautions while working or recreating in the forest can prevent most wildfires. Make a difference by following a few simple tips:

  • Operate ATVs and other motorized vehicles only on established roads.
  • Check your vehicle for dragging tow chains that can send sparks into roadside vegetation.
  • Don’t park or idle on dry grass or brush – the hot exhaust system can set it smoldering in seconds.
  • Check current fire restrictions for the area before building a campfire. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels are allowed at any time of year. Or simplify your life by bringing prepared foods instead of trying to cook over a smoky fire.
  • Smoke only in an enclosed vehicle. Properly dispose of cigarette butts.
  • If you see smoke, call 9-1-1.
  • Always have fire extinguishing tools on hand

New rule language regulating wildlife food plots on Oregon forestland effective Sept. 1, 2020. - 09/01/20

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry has completed the rulemaking process for wildlife food plots and has made the new rule language available online.  Landowners interested in establishing a wildlife food plot as an alternative management option on a portion of their ownership can view the new rules here: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/FPA.aspx

Under the Oregon Forest Practices Act, wildlife food plot establishment may occur on a small percent of forestland ownership that would be otherwise subject to the reforestation rules.  Landowners need to maintain appropriate vegetation and manage food plots to provide nutrition to the intended species. Wildlife species include deer or elk, birds, and even pollinating insects. Maximum food plot sizes on eligible ownerships range from a quarter acre to 50 acres.

Wildlife food plots originated in the 2015 Oregon Legislative Session and enacted as ORS 527.678 in 2016.  As required by the statute, ODF developed rule language for implementation.  Input from the Committee for Family Forestlands, Tribal Resources Cluster, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Regional Forest Practices Committees, and interested public was incorporated throughout the rulemaking process.  In July 2020, the Board of Forestry approved and finalized the rule language for wildlife food plots.  This rule language is effective September 1, 2020.

Forest landowners that wish to learn more or are interested in establishing a wildlife food plot on their property are encouraged to connect with their local Stewardship Forester https://www.oregon.gov/odf/working/Pages/findaforester.aspx

The Committee for Family Forestlands Forest Legacy and Stewardship Working Group will meet virtually Sept. 3 - 08/31/20

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands Forest Legacy and Stewardship Program Working Group will meet from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Thursday Sept. 3. This will be a virtual meeting. To join the call or provide public comment, contact Amy Singh at 971-718-1054 or Amy.S.Singh@Oregon.gov.

The working group will discuss the following topics:

  • Forest Legacy Program Updates
  • Forest Legacy Program Review of FY2022 Projects

Everyone is welcome to join the virtual meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Amy Singh at 971-718-1054 or Amy.S.Singh@Oregon.gov.

The Committee for Family Forestlands Forest Legacy and Stewardship Program Working Group advises the State Forester on policy and procedures for the U.S. Forest Service State and Private Forestry programs, such as Forest Legacy and Forest Stewardship. The working group consists of representatives from state and federal natural resource agencies, private forest landowners, consulting foresters, and forest industry and conservation organizations. You can find more information at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SCC.aspx.

Smoke rises yesterday from the Sweet Creek Milepost 2 Fire about a mile southwest of Mapleton in western Lane County. Firefighters continue to engage on the fire Monday.
Smoke rises yesterday from the Sweet Creek Milepost 2 Fire about a mile southwest of Mapleton in western Lane County. Firefighters continue to engage on the fire Monday.
Firefighters continue battling wildfire in western Lane County (Photo) - 08/31/20

MAPLETON, Ore. - Firefighters today are continuing their fight to slow the spread of a 400-acre wildfire in private forestland about 1 mile southeast of Mapleton in western Lane County. The fire is in steep terrain on the south side of the Siuslaw River and is burning toward the south away from Mapleton. 

Fire crews aided by six bulldozes, five water tenders, an excavator and a processor, are reinforcing control lines this morning that they dug yesterday. They are adding water hoses to the fire lines and working to extend those lines. However, the fire is still officially 0% contained.

Meanwhile, two helicopters are taking water from the Siuslaw River to drop on the fire. ODF fire officials are asking the pubic to avoid the area downstream from Mapleton in the Hadsall Creek Road section of the Siuslaw River where the helicopters are refilling their buckets. Fire officials are also asking the public to avoid the Hadsall Creek Road and Sweet Creek Road areas because of heavy firefighting traffic. 

Lane County Sherrif has eight homes under a Level 3 (Go) evacuation order and 24 homes under a Level 2 (Get Set) evacuation order.

A number of local firefighting agencies have been assisting on the fire, including :

  • Mapleton Fire Department
  • Siuslaw Valley Fire and Rescue (Florence)
  • Swisshome-Deadwood Rural Fire Protection District

Other agencies aiding in the fire include the Lance County Emergency Management, Lane County Road Department, Lane County Sheriff, Oregon Department of Transportation and the USDA Forest Service.

ODF Incident Management Team One led by Joe Hessel will take command of the fire at 6 p.m. tonight, freeing up local resources to focus again on initial attack on any new fires in coming days.

Cause of the fire is under investigation.

# # # 

 

ODF groundbased firefighters and multiple aircraft engaged on the Sweet Creek Milepost 2 Fire Sunday just outside Mapleton about 40 miles west of Eugene. More resources are expected to arrive Monday.
ODF groundbased firefighters and multiple aircraft engaged on the Sweet Creek Milepost 2 Fire Sunday just outside Mapleton about 40 miles west of Eugene. More resources are expected to arrive Monday.
ODF firefighters are tackling wildfire in Coast Range outside Mapleton (Photo) - 08/30/20

VENETA, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestry firefighters are engaged this evening on what has been named the Sweet Creek Milepost 2 Fire about a mile from Mapleton in western Lane County. The fire was reported today as a number of separate fires but is now being managed as one wildfire. At least six aircraft and more than half a dozen fire engines have been attacking the fire since it was reported Sunday afternoon. Two helicopters, two airtankers and two single-engine airtankers were engaged on the fire into early evening. This evening the fire was reported burning uphill and away from Mapleton.

ODF’s Western Lane District based in Veneta has called for more resources, which will be arriving Monday. Included in that order is ODF’s Incident Management Team 1 led by Incident Commander Joe Hessel. They will take command of the fire tomorrow evening at 6 p.m. The team will oversee active administration of the fire so the local district can continue to focus on initial attack on new fires.

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office has issued Level 3 (Go immediately) evacuation orders for residents of Hadsell Creek Road, and a Level 2 (Get Set – Be ready to leave) evacuation orders for Sweet Creek Road residents. For the latest evacuation information please go to https://www.lanecounty.org/news/sweetcreekfires.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

As more information is received new updates will be posted on ODF’s wildfire blog at https://odfwildfire.wpengine.com/

# # #

IMG_0485.jpeg
IMG_0485.jpeg
ODF firefighters use boats to reach fire on a roadless peninsula at Green Peter Lake (Photo) - 08/30/20

SWEET HOME, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestry firefighters had to enlist boats Saturday, Aug. 29, to reach a wildfire burning on a roadless peninsula in Green Peter Lake northeast of here. The fire, which is estimated at about 15 acres, was reported about 5:30 p.m. yesterday. Multiple engines from ODF's Sweet Home office responded. Upon reaching the lake they were quickly aided by private boaters who helped them ferry pumps, hoses and other equipment to the peninsula so they could engage on the fire. Boats from the Linn County Sheriff, Linn County Parks and Sweet Home Fire also assisted ODF firefighters in getting to and from the peninsula.

Two helicopters have been engaged since yesterday - one from a private industrial landowner and one on contract with the USDA Forest Service. The helicopters have been dropping water from the lake onto the fire. Just under 40 personnel are working on the fire today (Sunday, Aug. 30). In addition to ODF firefighters a handcrew from the Willamette National Forest, a USDA Forest Service Job Corps hand crew and two BLM resource advisors are also at the fire.

The fire is burning in thickly forested, steep terrain on federal land managed by the Bureau of Land Management's Northwest Oregon District, Cascades Field Office.

No evacuations are anticipated but the Whitcomb Creek County Park and its boat ramp are closed to the public as it is being used as a staging area for firefighting operations. Boaters are asked to use the Thistle Creek boat ramp instead and to avoid the Quartzville Arm of the lake so as not to interfere with the helicopters as they refill from that part of the lake. Quartzville Drive, also known as the Quartzville Back County Byway, remains opens.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

                                                            # # #

Attached Media Files: IMG_0485.jpeg
Hearing for proposed Siskiyou stream protection rules will be September 23 via Zoom - 08/27/20

SALEM, Ore. — A rulemaking hearing for proposed Siskiyou stream protection rules will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020 at 5:15 p.m. The proposed rules would extend to the Siskiyou region protections already in place in Western Oregon for streams that are home to salmon, steelhead and bull trout. To watch the hearing or provide public comment please register at https://odf.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJItfuyvrjIpEtexypJRaI5QDLZvv2m7Kb4a. If you experience any problems with registration or need technical assistance please contact ODF staff at least 24 hours prior to the meeting by email at ivateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov">privateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov or by phone, 503-851-9002. For additional information, please visit ODF’s Proposed laws & rules website.

The public comment deadline is Sept. 28, 2020 at 5 p.m. In addition to presenting oral comments at this hearing on the proposed rule amendment, anyone may submit written comments until the close of the public comment period deadline. 

Email: ivateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov">privateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov

Mail: Private Forest Siskiyou SSBT Rulemaking, Attention Greg Wagenblast, Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street, Salem, OR 97310

FAX: 503-945-7490

Note: Comments received after 5 p.m. on Sept. 28, 2020 will not be reviewed or considered by the agency unless the agency decides to extend the public comment period for everyone.

For requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities please contact staff at least 72 hours prior to the meeting by email ivateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov">privateforests.publiccomment@oregon.govor by phone, 503-851-9002.

Committee for Emergency Fire Cost to meet September 8 Via Zoom - 08/27/20

SALEM, Ore. – The Emergency Fire Cost Committee will meet virtually Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 10:00 a.m. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda.

The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Chrystal Bader at 503-945-7220.

Among agenda items are:

  • Financial status of the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund
  • Fiscal Claims update
  • Weather update
  • Status of Large Fire Cost Collection Efforts update
  • Insurance Market Update
  • Strategic investments
  • Administrator Report

This meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the end of the meeting as noted on the agenda.

The Emergency Fire Cost Committee oversees the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund (OFLPF), established by the Oregon Legislature as an insurance fund with the purpose of equalizing emergency fire suppression costs among the various Oregon Department of Forestry protection districts. The emergency funding system is designed to operate as an insurance policy whereby all districts contribute (pay premiums) into the fund so that money will be available to any individual district to pay fire suppression costs on emergency fires. More information can be found here: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Board/Pages/EFCC.aspx

Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meeting on August 28 canceled - 08/25/20

SALEM, Ore. — The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee’s scheduled meeting for Friday, August 28 in Salem has been canceled by Chair David Yamamoto.

“During this unprecedented time, county commissioners are focused on serving their constituents’ needs surrounding the pandemic,” Yamamoto said. “In an effort to reduce the number of meetings unrelated to the more immediate demands of the health crisis, I am cancelling the August 28 meeting.”