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News Releases
Future Connect students with Oregon State Treasurer Tobias Read, center
Future Connect students with Oregon State Treasurer Tobias Read, center
New report finds Future Connect makes critical impact on students' lives (Photo) - 09/20/17

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Portland Community College's Future Connect Scholarship Program is getting high marks.

A new report by Education Northwest indicates the comprehensive scholarship program has had a positive impact on completion rates for first-generation and low-income college students. This evaluation demonstrates how Future Connect improves first-year grade-point averages and credits earned, improves persistence to the second year of college, as well as increases three-year completion and transfer rates.

In particular, the program boosts college completion or transfer rates within three years by 11 percent. And, students in the program love it -- approximately 90 percent said the program helps them accomplish their career goals, and has changed their lives.

"Not only do students feel very positive about the support they receive from Future Connect -- the hard data is there to back them up," said Michelle Hodara, practice expert in applied research and postsecondary success with Education Northwest. "Future Connect is leading to substantial gains in postsecondary success and is a promising model of how to support first-generation and low-income students."

Launched in 2011, Future Connect targets these high school students within school districts located in Multnomah County, Hillsboro, and Beaverton school districts. The program focuses on eliminating barriers to attending college by way of on going support throughout a student's time at PCC. Future Connect uses scholarships, career guidance and personal advising to help students complete their degree and move on to four-year universities and colleges.

"At first, I thought going to PCC was not a good idea because I wanted to go straight to a four-year university like other students I know," said Beaverton resident Leslie Gonzalez Vasquez, who is studying to be a nurse. "Looking back now, I am thankful to have come to PCC because of the guidance and support of Future Connect. It has helped throughout my transition to college by having a coach to help me with the obstacles I encountered."

Future Connect addresses a critical need. First-generation and low-income college students face financial, social, informational and academic barriers to college completion because of the high cost of postsecondary education, the complexity of navigating college life, misalignment between high school and college academic expectations, and a general lack of guidance and information. The program, which has served 1,631 students between fall 2011 and fall 2016, aims to build a sense of community thriugh mentors and coaches who provide advice and goals.

"Future Connect works hard to provide a sense of belonging for students at our institution," said Josh Laurie, Future Connect manager. "We do this through our coaches' connection to students and through our ability to adapt, as a program, to student needs. Student feedback, gained from this evaluation, highlights the importance of these two approaches."

Key Findings on Future Connect:

* On average, Future Connect students have earned a 2.5 GPA and 27 credits in their first year, and among students who started in fall term, 76 percent persisted to the following fall term.
* Ninety-one percent of the students returned for a second term after their first term at PCC.
* Eighty-three percent returned the next academic year regardless of what term they started.
* Between fall 2011-14, 24 percent completed college or transferred to a university within three years. Specifically, 12 percent graduated and 12 percent transferred.
* Future Connect increased students' first-year GPA by 0.6 point, which represents an increase from a C to a B average.
* The program increased the number of first-year credits students earned by 12, which represents an additional term of credits for a full-time student. Early credit momentum in the first year, particularly in a program of study, is tied to increased likelihood of graduation.

The college's proven track record of bolstering equitable student success is getting a boost in other areas, as well. PCC has joined Achieving the Dream, a comprehensive, national reform movement focused on student success. The network of higher ed institutions, coaches and advisors, state policy teams, investors and partners are helping more than four million community college students across the country to better their chance for greater economic opportunity through education, and to experience equitable success as part of that journey.

For PCC President Mark Mitsui, Future Connect ties nicely into this effort.

"We want to help our students not only get here, but to succeed once they've arrived," Mitsui said. "We have rededicated ourselves to creating opportunity and equitable student success to change the trajectory of our students' lives."

The Education Northwest evaluation concluded that: "Providing long-term financial and advising support that addresses multiple barriers to college access and success may be the key to substantially improving completion rates for low-income, first-generation, and other underrepresented college students...Continued funding and research are both essential to supporting the improvement, sustainability, growth, and replication of Future Connect and similar programs across the country."

For the entire Education Northwest Evaluation, visit: http://educationnorthwest.org/sites/default/files/resources/future-connect-report-508.pdf

About Education Northwest: Chartered in 1966 as Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Education Northwest now conducts nearly 200 projects annually, working with schools, districts, and communities across the country on comprehensive, research-based solutions to the challenges they face. Its wide-ranging projects are making an impact in areas such as school improvement, community building, literacy, equity, and research and primarily work in the five Northwest states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.


About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 75,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. The PCC bond measure of $185 million would improve workforce training programs to better align with current and future jobs, invest in training for Health and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) programs, and upgrade safety, security, longevity and disability access. If passed, it is estimated to maintain the tax rate of 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value for the next 16 years.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/

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PCC strives to help parents stay in school with on-site childcare at all campuses (Photo) - 09/18/17

NORTHWEST PORTLAND, Ore. -- Most weekdays, Sylvia Koch commutes from Fairview to Portland Community College's Cascade Campus eager to attend classes for her nursing degree. But her first stop is Cascade Hall, where she drops off her 4-year-old daughter at the Albina Head Start childcare center.

This makes Koch fortunate compared to many of her peers. Studies have shown that parents with young children are often unable to attend college because they can't find affordable daycare. According to the nonprofit organization Childcare Aware of America, in 2015, the average annual cost for an infant in center-based care was higher than a year's tuition and fees at a four-year public college in 30 states (including Oregon) and the District of Columbia.

Koch, a single mother with three older children, said that before she enrolled her youngest at the Cascade facility, she had to rely on an in-home babysitter, which was not only costly but sometimes made attending class difficult.

"It would be a lot harder for me because of the financial situation -- paying for childcare -- and having to make sure the babysitter actually showed up," she said. "Before my daughter started going to Albina Head Start, my babysitter wasn't able to make it for a couple days and I had to miss school."

More than 2 million community college students in the U.S. are raising a child, or 30 percent of all community college students. However, the Institute for Women's Policy Research reported that while the number of student parents has been growing, the number of two-year colleges offering childcare has fallen from 53 percent in 2003-04 to 46 percent in 2013.

Portland Community College is among those that have made the commitment to offer on-site childcare to many of its students -- a goal that would be realized if the college's bond measure, on the November 2017 ballot, passes. At Cascade and Southeast campuses, new childcare facilities have been created thanks to the bond measure passed by voters in 2008. While Cascade's childcare center is run by Albina Head Start & Early Head Start, Southeast's is run by YMCA of Columbia-Willamette. At PCC Sylvania, the childcare facility is operated as part of the campus' Early Education and Family Studies Program.

If passed, the college's 2017 bond measure would enable PCC to build a childcare facility at the Rock Creek Campus near Beaverton and Hillsboro, as it currently is without this service line.

PCC's existing centers serve infants through preschool-aged children. Care at Southeast and Sylvania campuses is fee-based, although grants and subsidies are available for some parents. Cascade parents must meet federal poverty guidelines, but care is free for those who qualify. Head Start's program includes educational and wrap-around services that have been shown to be especially valuable for children from low-income homes.

Koch said that both she and her daughter appreciate Cascade's center. "I like everything about it," she said. "The staff are wonderful. They teach the children a lot, and I like that it's at PCC, which is where I want to be. "

Debra Porta, information and facilities assistant at Cascade Campus, said that the Head Start program helps ensure the parent's academic success and provides stability for their children.

"The parents are feeling more secure about the care of their children, which is allowing them to focus on school and other parts of their lives," she said. "It's allowed some of our parents to be able to go from part-time to full-time."


About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 75,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. The PCC bond measure of $185 million would improve workforce training programs to better align with current and future jobs, invest in training for Health and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) programs, and upgrade safety, security, longevity and disability access. If passed, it is estimated to maintain the tax rate of 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value for the next 16 years.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/

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PCC earns seed grant to establish first DACA resource center in state (Photo) - 09/14/17

WASHINGTON COUNTY, Ore. -- Undocumented students will soon have a space to fulfill their dreams of a post-secondary education.

This fall, through the Oregon Immigrant and Refugee Funders Collaborative, Meyer Memorial Trust awarded Portland Community College Foundation a $50,000 grant to help launch the DREAM Center (Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors) within the Multicultural Center at the Rock Creek Campus, 17705 N.W. Springville Road. The new center, the first of its kind at any Oregon community college or university, will provide outreach, education, advocacy and community resources, bilingual materials, and funding for urgent and emergency services for undocumented and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) students and their families.

For five years, DACA has given nearly 800,000 young Americans called "DREAMers," who were brought to the United States as children, the legal protections they need to work and study in the United States despite the immigration status of their parents. The new center, which the students have been asking for the past few years, will be instrumental in serving greater Washington County.

But recent policy changes imposed by U.S. President Donald J. Trump that threatened DACA have accelerated the need for the DREAM Center and the services it would provide.

"The Administration's actions have triggered unprecedented challenges for our
undocumented students," said Liliana Luna, Rock Creek Campus Multicultural Center coordinator who led the effort. "At PCC, we recognize that DREAMer students face unique barriers that require additional mental, emotional and financial support. The new DREAM Center would focus on the empowerment, support and retention of DREAMers and their families."

Established in 2001, the campus' Multicultural Center is designed to provide a welcoming environment to support, retain, and empower diverse students to achieve academic excellence and become leaders who challenge and dismantle systems of oppression. In recent years, the center has grown from serving 2,500 students in 2013-14 to 7,200 in 2016-17. Each of the four PCC comprehensive campuses has a multicultural center.

For students who are undocumented, the uncertainty of President Trump's policies has been challenging. In addition to family concerns and deportation risks, uncertainty over what scholarships these students qualify for, and whether they can find work to pay for school, weighs heavily on them.

"The election instilled fear, not just for me but for my family," said one PCC student named Antonio. "It really impacted me mentally, being constantly worried if my parents are going to come home, the need to look after my younger sibling, how to pay the bills and how to fulfill my dream of going to college. When I look for scholarships, I don't look for the GPA requirement. I look for whether I have to be a citizen."

Last December, the college's Board of Directors declared PCC a "sanctuary college," to aid and protect undocumented students. In announcing the designation, President Mark Mitsui emphasized concerns about the impact of potential changes in federal immigration policy on PCC's undocumented students. To address such urgent concerns, the Rock Creek Multicultural Center worked with college leadership to develop a DREAM Center and base it on successful models and best practices from the U.S. Department of Education's "Resource Guide on Supporting Undocumented Youth in Postsecondary Settings."

"The PCC Board of Directors believes in our DREAMers," said PCC Board Chair Kali Thorne-Ladd. "Community colleges are open-access institutions whose mission is to educate and empower students to achieve their academic and career goals. DACA is an important asset that facilitates this mission, providing stability and economic opportunity."

The new PCC DREAM Center plans to serve 20 families and 20 students per academic term through the college's community resource hub. It will have legal services, assist in facilitating and processing initial DACA applications and renewal applications, provide workshops on student support and college navigation resources, and conduct academic/career advising sessions. In addition, the center will partner with local community organizations Adelante Mujeres, the Hillsboro School District, Momentum Alliance, Centro Cultural, and the Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce.

"Many of these organizations are well established within the community as sources of support and empowerment for DACA and undocumented youth," said Luna. "Partnering with these organizations on outreach and promotion will help students and their families become aware of the proposed DREAM Center services more quickly and effectively."

The PCC Foundation aids and promotes the mission of the college by providing scholarships, equipment for teaching and training, and support for faculty and special programs. In 2016-17, the Foundation awarded more than $1.5 million in scholarships to 1,550 students, most of whom have high financial need, are first-generation college students and students from communities of color.

The Oregon Immigrant and Refugee Funders Collaborative, a partnership between The Collins Foundation, MRG Foundation, Oregon Community Foundation and Meyer Memorial Trust, aims to highlight the importance of refugees and immigrants to Oregon and the joint commitment to address the need for their successful integration into the local community. The Meyer Memorial Trust is a private foundation that works with and invests in organizations, communities, ideas and efforts that contribute to a flourishing and equitable Oregon.


About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 75,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. The PCC bond measure of $185 million would improve workforce training programs to better align with current and future jobs, invest in training for Health and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) programs, and upgrade safety, security, longevity and disability access. If passed, it is estimated to maintain the tax rate of 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value for the next 16 years.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/

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As college infrastructure matures, staff keep watch to ensure student comfort, safety (Photo) - 09/12/17

NORTHWEST PORTLAND, Ore. -- For sure, passing grades and a diploma are key measurements of student success. However, it's often a multitude of contributing factors -- like great spaces and advanced technology -- that are key to students reaching their academic goals. Too often, these contributors go unrecognized.

Ivan Hernandez, a Rock Creek Campus student leader from Hillsboro, called attention to these types of support systems.

"Comfortable study areas have played a major role in my success at school," said Hernandez. "Many times, students are looking for a way out of their routine, away from the noise. We need quiet, accessible, clean and safe spaces to study; this gives us peace of mind."

Portland Community College's Facilities Management Services (FMS) makes sure that buildings and HVAC systems are comfortable for faculty, staff and students like Ivan. At Rock Creek, though, two 41-year-old boilers -- 15 years past their expected lifespan -- heat 300,000 square feet of building space, which is more than half the campus. FMS staff have done heroic work to keep them humming, but signs of aging -- like semi-frequent pipe and valve leaks -- are worsening and represent significant cost to the college to repair.

"Their working condition is testament to our team's ability to maintain the boilers," said Tony Ichsan, FMS director. "We may be able to preserve them so that they function, but the boilers are well past their life cycles of 25-30 years. So, that's the challenge: To regularly repair them is costly, and if they go out completely then we're in a desperate situation, which is also very costly."

This November, PCC is putting a $185 million bond measure on the ballot that would, if passed, address aging systems, improve information technology infrastructure and safety, building accessibility, and improve centers for workforce training.

New HVAC systems and equipment would not only provide a lower cost of operation and maintenance, but would also meet PCC's Climate Action Plan goals of reducing carbon emissions. Today's high efficiency boilers use less gas and produce far fewer emissions thanks to technological advances. And this is attractive to potential students: Survey research indicates that students are interested in, and often select to attend, "green" colleges with robust sustainable achievements.

"FMS strives to create and maintain the built and natural environment so that students are inspired and engaged by their place of learning," Ichsan said. "And this is an assist to student retention; if students are freezing or sweltering, it obviously does not provide an optimal learning environment."

Other key factors contributing to student success are ADA accessibility and safety, as well as information technology upgrades that enhance the student's learning experience. The college wants to improve day-to-day classroom technology, like the addition of smart podiums, as well as possibly overhauling the software and services that support students -- last updated more than two decades ago.

These potential software upgrades would affect registration, advising, online services, financial aid and human resources' talent management, and they support improved non-credit class registration and operations. Some of the college's older core online management systems limit PCC's service offerings in light of students' evolving expectations of digital services. Upgrades would enable the college to provide tailored services that connect well to the wireless world, and to the self-service features that students and their parents have come to expect.

"The older system wasn't designed well for mobile devices, and students using phones as their primary communication device find it hard to do business with us," said PCC Dean of Student Affairs Tammy Billick. "It was created prior to the web-based world, therefore it limits what we can do to serve students the way they now expect to be served online. Because of its limitations, it's expensive to use for today's needs."

Hernandez has loved his time at PCC. The son of a migrant worker, he helped his family by working in landscaping, construction, kitchens, waving sidewalk signs and caregiving. None of the jobs paid much, but they enabled him to enroll at the college to begin his academic journey. Today, Hernandez serves as Rock Creek's student body president. He will graduate from PCC next June, attending Pacific University to pursue a degree in political science. Eventually, he said, he wants to have his own marketing firm and earn his master's degree in Business Administration.

Without comfortable spaces in which to study or a welcoming campus life, Hernandez questions whether he would believe these goals to be realistic.

"Educational technology and well-maintained buildings at PCC have been crucial to my education," he said. "No doubt."


About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 75,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. The PCC bond measure of $185 million would improve workforce training programs to better align with current and future jobs, invest in training for Health and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) programs, and upgrade safety, security, longevity and disability access. If passed, it is estimated to maintain the tax rate of 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value for the next 16 years.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/

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Cascade Campus' aging public safety building poses challenges for staff (Photo) - 09/07/17

NORTH PORTLAND, Ore. -- Ensuring student success includes providing a safe and supportive learning environment, and on any given day Portland Community College's public safety officers are called to deal with everything from a disruptive individual in the cafeteria to locked keys in a car.

At Cascade Campus, the staff works out of the college's oldest public safety facility, a modest one-level structure on Killingsworth Street at Commercial Avenue, at the outermost edge of campus. It was originally built as a residence in 1952 and later served for several years as a dentist's office.

The list of problems at the aged building is long and poses challenges for the seven officers who work there. According to their supervisor, Sgt. Erik Hargrove, there are windows that don't open, paper-wrapped wiring and peeling paint. The heating and cooling systems need frequent service and there are structural issues with the roof.

The small room that serves as the men's locker room still has the plumbing and outlets for the dental practice's nitrous oxide and oxygen lines, and the basement is still equipped for sterilizing dental tools. On a recent visit, the only place to stow an officer's bicycle was in the bathroom.

"This space was never intended to house us," said Hargrove. "A lot of things are cobbled together just because they've had to be, as opposed to being designed specifically with public safety input into how a space is intended to be used."

PCC's other campuses have purpose-built public safety offices, but as Hargrove described, the most critical problem at Cascade is that its safety office is difficult to find and the exterior -- complete with metal bars on the windows and front door -- is forbidding instead of welcoming or reassuring to the campus and community.

"People just don't know where we are, and it's tough to differentiate us from any other structure in the neighborhood as opposed to being part of the college," he said. "Our entry way is the farthest point from the edge of campus and it's set into the wall, and until you're almost past it you don't know what's here."

PCC's bond measure on the November ballot includes funding for safety and security upgrades throughout the college, as well as $3 million for a new, dedicated facility on the same site at Cascade. As with the current office, the new building would include space for the City of Portland police staff who partner with Cascade's officers.

For Hargrove, connectivity with the campus and community is vital to public safety's mission, "If we had a space that was designed to make it very well known what is here, then people would be more inclined and able to find us and utilize the services that we provide," he added.

Hargrove has worked at the campus for eight years and said he has witnessed how the extensive improvements funded by the 2008 bond measure -- including the construction of two new buildings and two plazas -- have played a major role in transforming Cascade, fostering community, and helping strengthen nearby businesses.

"Since I started here the number of calls we respond to has remained steady, but the number of critical incidents we go to has decreased," he said. "The campus has taken greater responsibility for not only their space, but the space that surrounds us."


About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 75,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. The PCC bond measure of $185 million would improve workforce training programs to better align with current and future jobs, invest in training for Health and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) programs, and upgrade safety, security, longevity and disability access. If passed, it is estimated to maintain the tax rate of 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value for the next 16 years.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/

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Bond would support programs leading to high demand careers, workforce training and safety (Photo) - 09/01/17

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Portland is growing fast -- and in order to meet the changing needs of its workforce, the city's largest college is in need of upgrades.

In some cases, it's a matter of modernizing equipment and technology. In others, facility overhaul has been determined as the most efficient and economical method of delivering long term, high quality instruction to support student success and best serve the community at large. To accomplish this, PCC's Board of Directors has voted in favor of placing a bond measure on the Nov. 7 ballot for consideration by voters within the college's 1,500-square-mile district.

If passed, the bond would improve workforce training programs to align with current and future industry needs, and better the chance students can secure higher paying positions.

"The college has a two-pronged responsibility: to its students and to Portland metro area voters who have so generously supported PCC in the past," said Kali Thorne Ladd, chair of PCC's Board of Directors.

"Approval of the bond measure by voters would enable PCC's ongoing protection of the community's investment in PCC and the college's current assets. Furthermore, the college would be positioned to advance delivery of top quality instruction so that diverse students receive the training and preparation needed to jumpstart their careers or further their education," she said.

If passed, the PCC bond measure is estimated to maintain the tax rate of 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value, for 16 years, with the total principal amount of the bonds authorized not to exceed $185 million. For a home assessed at $200,000, the annual cost of the bond to a homeowner is estimated to be $80 per year, or $6.66 per month.

Funds from the bond measure would go toward projects expected to:

* Improve workforce training programs to align with current and future industry needs, and better the chance students can secure higher paying positions -- necessary in a metro area whose cost of living continues to climb.
* Advance training in Health and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) programs -- disciplines with dynamic career potential, given continued growth in the fields.
* Upgrade safety, security, facility longevity, and disability access across the college.

Another reason that underscores PCC's responsibility to deliver on these goals: The college is Oregon's largest postsecondary institution, serving approximately 75,000 full-time and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas and Columbia counties. It is an educational leader with significant responsibilities throughout the region: PCC collaborates in myriad ways with the state's other community colleges, public and private universities, K-12 school districts, as well as workforce, business and industry, and non-profits, among other community partners.

"Oregon relies on PCC," said Thorne Ladd.

Sylvia Kelley, PCC's executive vice president with oversight of the college's bond program, added, "PCC is charged with helping to create a stronger community and economy by way of education -- training students who are skilled and workforce ready by the time they leave the college. In this way, PCC contributes to the economic growth and vitality of the region, as its graduates succeed in high-demand, high-paying jobs."

Unlike the 2008 voter-approved bond measure, which earmarked $374 million toward building renovation throughout the district and the addition of needed facilities -- like a comprehensive campus in Southeast Portland and the Swan Island Trades Center -- the 2017 bond measure is geared more toward protecting and maintaining the life expectancy of its existing physical structures, in addition to upgrading technology needed to achieve this.

In the case of a few buildings that weren't touched as part of the 2008 bond measure, studies indicate the college would be best served by reconstruction to reduce costs for maintenance, ensure high quality instruction for students, and enhance on-site safety and security. If the 2017 bond measure is passed, facilities to be tackled would include the Portland Metropolitan Workforce Training Center in Northeast Portland, Sylvania Campus Health Technology Building in Southwest Portland, Cascade Campus Public Safety Building in North Portland, and the Rock Creek Campus Child Development Center in Washington County.

Similar to the 2008 bond measure, PCC intends to continue its successful community partnerships in this new bond. One example is the state's $8 million in capital matching funds to be put toward Sylvania's Health Technology Building remodel. Another is the 2020 move of PCC's Dental Program and community dental clinic from the Sylvania Campus to downtown Portland, to be housed in a new academic facility alongside the Oregon Health & Science University/Portland State University School of Public Health, PSU's Graduate School of Education, and a City of Portland bureau.

"Local investment in higher education, collaboration and partnership can open doors and create incredible opportunities, ones that benefit the community at large because we're pooling our talent and resources for the greater good," said PCC President Mark Mitsui. He added that through PCC's prudent financial stewardship, the college was able to achieve $9.2 million in total savings to taxpayers through general obligation refunding bonds.

PCC is conducting a long term, comprehensive study of its physical structures, space utilization, academic programs, and technology infrastructure. Feedback gathered has helped, in part, to inform and set the parameters of the 2017 bond measure focused on workforce training, health professions and STEAM, safety, security and facility lifespan longevity.

"Our commitment to students and the greater community has been at the center of our discussions throughout this study," said Linda Degman, director of PCC's Bond Program. "The college both supports and belongs to the community. We have a responsibility to maintain PCC's health and longevity so that we're able to deliver equitable student success, educate our future workforce, and contribute to Oregon's economic vigor and long term prosperity," she said.


About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 75,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. The PCC bond measure of $185 million would improve workforce training programs to better align with current and future jobs, invest in training for Health and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) programs, and upgrade safety, security, longevity and disability access. If passed, it is estimated to maintain the tax rate of 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value for the next 16 years.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/

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