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Shared Vision for the Deschutes
Shared Vision for the Deschutes
Media Advisory: Central Oregon Partners Launch "Shared Vision for the Deschutes" (Photo) - 01/27/19

River advocacy organizations, irrigation districts, businesses, nonprofits, and individuals are coming together in support of a “Shared Vision for the Deschutes.” Shared Vision partners believe they will be able to restore the river to a healthy condition in the shortest time practicable by working together as partners in a genuinely collaborative manner for the betterment of all.

Shared Vision partners support:

  • A healthy restored Deschutes River
  • Thriving farms and sustainable agriculture
  • Robust and vibrant communities

To kick off the Shared Vision campaign, partners representing the recreation, conservation, agriculture, river advocacy, nonprofit and business industry will gather Tuesday, January 29, 2019, to launch and celebrate the Shared Vision for the Deschutes.

Shared Vision Speakers

Gail Snyder, Executive Director, Coalition for Deschutes
Mike Britton, Manager, Deschutes Basin Board of Control
Craig Horrell, Managing Director, Central Oregon Irrigation District
Bobby Bruno, General Manager, Natural Resources and Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for Confederated Tribe of Warm Springs and the Chair of the Deschutes River Conservancy
Ron Nelson, Executive Director, Deschutes River Conservancy
Mike and Tom Kirsch, Qwners, Madras Farms
Fred Foisset, fishing guide, and owner of The Hook Fly Shop
Michelle and Julie Alvarado, recreational enthusiasts

Date: Tuesday, January 29, 2019
Time: 4:30 p.m. - reception, 
5:00 p.m. – speaking program
Location: Riverhouse on the Deschutes Currents Building, Deschutes South Room, 3075 N. Business 97, Bend, Ore.

Phone interviews are available for media unable to attend.

 

 

 

 

Attached Media Files: Shared Vision for the Deschutes
Search Underway for City of Prineville Roundabout Artwork - 01/22/19

Northwest artists invited to submit original designs that will serve as visual gateway to Prineville and the Ochocos

(PRINEVILLE, Ore)—With the completion of the Tom McCall Roundabout, Oregon’s second-largest single lane traffic circle designed to accommodate highway-caliber traffic, the City of Prineville is conducting a search for an original, large scale, interpretive public artwork to adorn it.

Situated at the intersection of Highway 126 and Tom McCall Drive at the west entrance of Prineville, the roundabout artwork will symbolize the history and character of the community, while serving as a welcome to both visitors and residents.

No public dollars are being tapped for Prineville’s roundabout art initiative. The project cost -- $125,000 -- is funded in full by local private sources.

“The Tom McCall Roundabout Art Design is an exciting opportunity to celebrate our unique, high desert community,” said Prineville Mayor Steve Uffelman. “We’re looking for a regional artist who can take inspiration from the community's recreational opportunities, natural beauty, and cultural heritage to create a well-integrated, visual focal point worthy of this special place.”

One of the first incorporated cities in Oregon, Prineville is geographically located at the center of the state and serves as a gateway to the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River National Grassland, as well as thousands of acres of public lands.

Only Northwest artists residing in Oregon, Washington or Idaho may submit a Request for Proposal (RFP), which are being accepted through March 5.

For more project details and submission guidelines, visit http://bit.ly/PrinevilleRoundabout 

About the City of Prineville

Located east of the Cascade mountains in Oregon’s high desert, the City of Prineville is a resurgent rural community that has preserved its small-town, ranching roots and Western lifestyle while embracing smart growth in a business-friendly environment. With a population nearing 10,000 residents, the county seat of Crook County attracts a diversity of business and lifestyle interests, including tech giants Facebook and Apple, recreational enthusiasts, and a thriving agricultural industry. Incorporated in 1880, City of Prineville operates the oldest continuously running municipal short line railway in the U.S., as well as a public golf course, and airport. Prineville boasts numerous recreational assets, including the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River, and remains a popular destination for anglers and hunters. For more information on City services and programs visit cityofprineville.com.