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News Releases
DOC Director's statement on administrative segregation - 09/02/15
Oregon Department of Corrections Director Colette S. Peters released the following statement regarding a report published today on the nationwide use of administrative segregation by the Association of State Correctional Administrators (ASCA) and the Arthur Liman Public Interest Program at Yale Law School.

"I commend ASCA and the Yale Law School for their efforts in compiling the latest statistics on states' use of administrative segregation and for bringing national light to this important issue. This is a strong first step in understanding the complex landscape of special housing use, conditions, and staffing.

"In Oregon, we are already taking steps to analyze our use of special housing and safely reduce our reliance on it as a prison management tool. We have made this one of our top agency initiatives. As part of this initiative, in March, Oregon was one of five states selected to participate in the Vera Institute of Justice's Safe Alternatives to Segregation initiative. We will receive up to two years of technical assistance, focused on analyzing our use of segregated housing and developing recommendations for its safe reduction, as well as initial assistance with implementation of those recommendations.

"We look forward to our continued work with Vera, and to more robust dialogue with our counterparts in other states - and our key stakeholders and partners at home - about how we can collectively work to reduce the use of special housing across the nation."

View ASCA's press release: http://www.asca.net/system/assets/attachments/8895/ASCA%20LIMAN%20Press%20Release%208-28-15.pdf?1441222595
Full report: http://www.law.yale.edu/documents/pdf/Liman/ASCA-Liman_Administrative_Segregation_Report_Sep__2_2015.pdf


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Oregon State Penitentiary reports inmate death - 09/02/15
At approximately 6:20 a.m. on September 2, Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) inmate Ronald Anthony Drennen, 69, died unexpectedly in the infirmary. Oregon State Police confirmed the death was due to natural causes.

Drennen entered Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) custody on January 16, 2013, on one count of assault in the third degree out of Clackamas County. His earliest release date was September 22, 2016.

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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Powwow festivities
Powwow festivities
Warner Creek Correctional Facility hosts Annual Powwow (Photo) - 09/02/15
Native American people from a variety of tribal heritages joined together at Warner Creek Correctional Facility (WCCF) on August 29 to honor the Creator through song, drumming, dance, and readings at the Annual Powwow. Powwow is an opportunity for Native Americans to develop a spiritual connection among themselves and with the larger Native American community. Eighty-five people were in attendance, including adults in custody, guests, volunteers, and staff.

Those incarcerated honored many of their guests with various gifts, some of which were created by the Native Beading Class overseen by Chaplain Ken Ball. Attendees dined on salmon, beef, buffalo, elk, and pork. Many of the dishes were donated by families and guests. Traditional side dishes served were flat bread and fresh fruit.

Volunteer Lloyd Powell was the arena director for the event. Special guest participation was provided by two drumming groups, Thoz Womenz and Unole, as well as WCCF inmate drummers. Many Native American dances were performed, including two Pacific Islander dances. The support of the WCCF staff and the community made this year's Annual Powwow a great success.

WCCF is a minimum-security prison in Lakeview that houses approximately 486 male inmates who are within four years of release. WCCF provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, transitional programs, religious services, and work opportunities. WCCF has a contact center on site through Oregon Corrections Enterprises. WCCF opened in September 2005 and is Oregon's newest operating prison. It received the State Energy Efficiency Design (SEED) award in May 2008 for its progress in design efficiency. The most energy-efficient element at WCCF is the use of geothermal energy, providing 100 percent of the hot water to the facility.


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Career and Technology Training Graduates
Career and Technology Training Graduates
Coffee Creek Correctional Facility women complete career program (Photo) - 08/28/15
Thirteen women in custody at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) celebrated the completion of a 15-month Career and Technology Training program on August 20.

The program - offered through Portland Community College - helps women in custody develop computer skills including keyboarding and proficiency in several Microsoft programs (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access). The 13 graduates earned their Microsoft Office Specialist certifications. In addition, they studied "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" by Stephen Covey to develop better work habits and decision-making skills.

The course offered the women hands-on experience with a variety of tasks to boost employability and work skills training, for example working in Prison Bytes, an institution stationery business. Coaching was provided in preparing cover letters and resumes, interviewing, career exploration, and planning.

Previous graduates who have released from prison credited the course as key in staying focused and setting goals. Other helpful elements from the course included punctuality, completing tasks, planning and prioritizing, and organizing time and materials. Also of benefit was working as a team, interacting professionally, and following instructions for such an extended period of time.

CCCF is a multi-custody facility in Wilsonville that houses more than 1,200 women. It provides intake and evaluation of all female and male inmates committed to state custody. CCCF delivers a range of correctional services and programs including alcohol and drug treatment, education, work opportunities, cognitive programming, and pre-release services. The minimum facility opened in 2001 and the medium facility opened in 2002. CCCF is Oregon's only women's prison.

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Inmate William A. Beebe
Inmate William A. Beebe
UPDATE: Inmate walks away from Santiam Correctional Institution work crew (Photo) - Inmate Back in custody - 08/27/15
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UPDATE: William Beebe is back in custody. Salem Police Department and Oregon State Police arrested him today at approximately 12:33 p.m. in Salem. No other details are available at this time.

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Today at approximately 9:30 a.m., inmate William Arch Beebe walked away from an Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) work crew in the area of Richmond Elementary School in southeast Salem. Local law enforcement is assisting.

Beebe is an inmate at Santiam Correctional Institution (SCI) in Salem. He was working on a ten-man crew when staff discovered he was missing.

Beebe is a 38-year-old Caucasian male, 6 feet 2 inches tall, 180 pounds, clean shaven, and has hazel eyes. He was last seen wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange, and a blue t-shirt similarly stenciled in orange.

Beebe entered DOC custody on June, 23, 2015, on two counts of unauthorized use of a vehicle out of Marion County. His earliest release date is April 6, 2017.

Anyone with information regarding Beebe's whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at
1-800-452-7888.

SCI is a minimum-security prison in Salem that houses approximately 440 male inmates who are within four years of release. The facility concentrates on work opportunities, most of which are in the form of work crews contracting with state agencies, local organizations, and private industries within a 60-mile radius of Salem. SCI provides a range of other correctional programs and services including education, transition programs, and religious services. The building that is now SCI was constructed in 1946 and originally was used as an annex to the Oregon State Hospital for mental health patients. Over the years it was used for a variety of correctional purposes until, in 1990, it opened as SCI.

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Attached Media Files: Inmate William A. Beebe
FREE
FREE
CRCI hosts "FREE" event (Photo) - 08/26/15
Columbia River Correctional Institution (CRCI) held its third annual Family Relationship Enhancement Event (FREE) on August 8, with 95 inmates and 205 visitors participating. Approximately 25 Portland-area Rotary Club members and 30 inmates volunteered to help with the event, which this year focused on "Back to School."

Throughout the year, inmates raised close to $5,000 to fund FREE. Along with help from local Rotary Clubs, they were able to provide everyone with a shared meal, and they gave backpacks and school supplies to all school-aged children at the event. Inmates and visitors enjoyed entertainment by the Arts in Prison program, who performed several songs written by those in custody.

Events of this nature are part of an overall effort to increase visiting and family engagement at all 14 Oregon Department of Corrections prisons. Research shows that those who stay connected and receive visits while incarcerated are more likely to be successful when they release.

CRCI is a minimum-security facility that houses approximately 595 male inmates who are within four years of release. Located in the largest metropolitan area of the state, this facility is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. CRCI is home to a 50-bed cognitive restructuring Alternative Incarceration Program (AIP). Individuals who successfully complete this 180-day in-prison program are released to the community for a 90-day transitional leave period. Individuals who successfully complete the transitional leave period are granted a reduction in their sentence and move to post-prison supervision. CRCI is located on a 26-acre site in northeast Portland and officially in opened in September 1990.

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Attached Media Files: FREE , CRCI's family event
Beaded jewelry for Powwow guests
Beaded jewelry for Powwow guests
Powder River Correctional Facility hosts Annual Powwow (Photo) - 08/24/15
On August 1, Powder River Correctional Facility held its Annual Powwow. This year's event hosted 78 people, including inmates, guests, volunteers, and staff.

Powwows are an opportunity for Native Americans to come together with dancing and singing as well as visit with one another to maintain old friendships and make new ones.

Those in attendance dined on barbequed salmon, beef, buffalo, and chicken, which was donated by inmate families and guests. Traditional side dishes, including flat bread and fresh fruit, were also served.

A weekly Native Beading Class, coordinated and overseen by Chaplain Haefer, allows Native American inmates to create items to be given as gifts to the powwow guests in honor of their heritage. Wood-burned items fabricated in PRCF's Physical Plant were also on display.

PRCF is a minimum-security prison in Baker City that houses approximately 366 male inmates who are within four years of release. PRCF serves as a transition and re-entry facility and is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. PRCF is home to the 128-bed New Directions (Drug and Alcohol Treatment) Alternative Incarceration Program. Individuals who successfully complete this 180-day in-prison program are released to the community for a 90-day transitional leave period. Individuals who successfully complete the transitional leave period are granted a reduction in their sentence and move to post-prison supervision. PRCF opened in November 1989.

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Fun at SRCI's Dads4Life Day Camp
Fun at SRCI's Dads4Life Day Camp
Snake River Correctional Institution hosts kids day camp (Photo) - 08/24/15
Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) hosted their second Annual Dads4Life Kids Day Camp on August 10 and 11. In partnership with the Ontario Church of the Nazarene and the Treasure Valley Children's Relief Nursery, activities were provided for children and their fathers to promote family bonding and interaction.

Dads4Life (Doing As Dads Should 4 Life) is a program that SRCI created to help meet the needs of incarcerated fathers and their children. Dads4Life holds numerous events throughout the year. The Dads4Life program has also created a support group that holds biweekly meetings to encourage pro-social behavior and the importance of family connections.

The atmosphere of the Day Camp was different from a regular visiting session. The fathers stated that it was a time they could actually be "normal" dads with their children. One participant, Inmate Ayers said, "I was so glad to have the opportunity to sit with my daughter and read a book or participate in an activity." SRCI strives to encourage stronger connections between fathers and children. Many families participating in these events hope to begin to mend the struggling relationships they've had with the fathers.

Debbie Blackaby, a member of SRCI's Prison Advisory Committee commented on the event. "I feel it is so important for the children to be able to spend this quality interaction time with their fathers, but also for the fathers to spend the quality interaction time with their children. I commend the fathers for the dedication and hard work on their part to be able to participate in this program. I also appreciate the work and dedication from the staff at SRCI that make this program possible, along with Pastor Tim Brewer, the Nazarene Church, and other community partners who donated to the success of the SRCI 2015 Dads4Life Kids Day Camp. The SRCI Prison Advisory Committee fully supports the Dads4life program and the kids camp because we understand that family connections make an inmate's release more successful and reduces the chance that these children will be incarcerated later on when they are older. It's a win-win."

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 male inmates. It has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. The facility opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

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Family fun at PRCF
Family fun at PRCF
Powder River Correctional Facility hosts third Annual Family Day (Photo) - 08/24/15
Powder River Correctional Facility (PRCF) held its third Annual Family Day Event on July 25. The event was attended by 50 adults in custody and 164 friends and family members.

This year's event included a petting zoo, face painting, three-legged races, BINGO, fishing, and more. Local community volunteers and PRCF staff were on hand for a fun-filled day that has become one of PRCF's most popular facility occasions. Family Day was created to help families and friends understand the importance of their role in the successful transition of their loved ones back into Oregon's communities.

Events such as this at PRCF are part of an overall effort to increase visiting and family engagement at all 14 Oregon Department of Corrections prisons. Research shows that those who stay connected and receive visits while incarcerated are more likely to be successful when they release.

PRCF is a minimum-security prison in Baker City that houses approximately 366 male inmates who are within four years of release. PRCF serves as a transition and re-entry facility and is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. PRCF is home to the 128-bed New Directions (Drug and Alcohol Treatment) Alternative Incarceration Program. Individuals who successfully complete this 180-day in-prison program are released to the community for a 90-day transitional leave period. Individuals who successfully complete the transitional leave period are granted a reduction in their sentence and move to post-prison supervision. PRCF opened in November 1989.

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OSCI Graduates
OSCI Graduates
Graduation at Oregon State Correctional Institution (Photo) - 08/20/15
Oregon State Correctional Institution (OSCI) and Chemeketa Community College held their first graduation of the year on August 11. Five students earned their General Education Development (GED) certificates and three students received their associate's degrees. The graduates were able to invite their families and friends to celebrate their achievements.

Nearly half of the individuals admitted to the custody of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) have no high school diploma or GED certificate. Research has shown inmates who participate in correctional education programs have much lower odds of recidivating than inmates who do not. Research has also shown the odds of obtaining employment post-release among adults in custody who participated in correctional education (either academic or vocational programs) were higher than the odds for those who did not.

OSCI is a medium-security men's prison in Salem that houses approximately 870 male inmates. It provides a range of correctional services and programs including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, inmate work crews, and transition planning. OSCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a print shop and a contact center. OSCI was established by action of the 1955 Legislature and became fully operational on June 1, 1959.

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Attached Media Files: OSCI Graduates
Inmate Danny Spillers
Inmate Danny Spillers
Inmate escapes from Columbia River Correctional Institution - inmate back in custody (Photo) - 08/14/15
UPDATE: Danny Spillers is back in custody. U.S. Marshals arrested him today at approximately 5:30 p.m. in Fairview. No other details are available at this time.

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CRCI staff discovered inmate Danny Spillers missing at approximately 5:30 a.m., Sunday, August 2, after discovering a broken window in the kitchen area.

Spillers is a 35-year-old Caucasian male, 6 feet tall, 185 pounds, with red hair and hazel eyes. He is most likely wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange (or red shorts), and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Spillers entered DOC custody on June 9, 2015, on four counts of burglary in the second degree and one count of unauthorized use of a vehicle out of Multnomah County. His earliest release date is April 13, 2017.

Anyone with information regarding Spillers whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

CRCI is a minimum-security facility that houses approximately 595 male inmates who are within four years of release. Located in the largest metropolitan area of the state, this facility is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. CRCI is home to a 50-bed cognitive restructuring Alternative Incarceration Program (AIP). Individuals who successfully complete this 180-day in-prison program are released to the community for a 90-day transitional leave period. Individuals who successfully complete the transitional leave period are granted a reduction in their sentence and move to post-prison supervision. CRCI is located on a 26-acre site in northeast Portland and officially in opened in September 1990.

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Attached Media Files: Inmate Danny Spillers
Lakota Club Powwow
Lakota Club Powwow
Oregon State Penitentiary hosts annual powwow (Photo) - 08/13/15
Tribal voices, songs, and stories were shared at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) Lakota Oyate Ki Club's 31st Annual All Day Big Yard Powwow on August 1. One hundred and six inmates, seven volunteers, six tribal representatives, 58 community guests, and 15 staff members all worked together to ensure the powwow was a successful event.

To start the day's events, Native American veterans were honored and recognized as they began the grand entry. Native American elders, powwow royalty, community leaders, and club supporters followed them closely. As one, they moved together as a community of family in time with drum and song. The powwow - both a secular and a sacred ceremony - is considered to be a continuous prayer from beginning to end.

The Lakota Oyate Ki Club (Native American Culture Club) is a multi-faceted organization in existence at OSP since 1968. The club helps ensure incarcerated Native Americans have encouragement to maintain a strong sense of cultural identity through a deeper, more meaningful connection with the Native American community beyond the walls of the Penitentiary. It is the strength of this identity that serves as a foundation for the individual. This foundation can help support the rehabilitative process and future of the individual who goes on to become a law abiding and productive member of his community.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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Attached Media Files: Lakota Club Powwow
L-R: Westside Institutions Administrator Brian Belleque, OCE General Manager David Conway, Rachael Conway, Selena Ortiz, Correctional Officer Jess Ortiz, Justin Harris, Lorri Harris, Chad Harris, and Release Services Manager Hank Harris.
L-R: Westside Institutions Administrator Brian Belleque, OCE General Manager David Conway, Rachael Conway, Selena Ortiz, Correctional Officer Jess Ortiz, Justin Harris, Lorri Harris, Chad Harris, and Release Services Manager Hank Harris.
Susan M. Hunter Scholarship presented to five children of DOC employees (Photo) - 08/13/15
The children of four Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) employees were recently named recipients of the 2015 Association of State Correctional Administrators (ASCA) Susan M. Hunter Correctional Scholarship. The scholarship is named in honor of Susan Hunter, the former Chief of the Prisons Division at the National Institute of Corrections, as a lasting tribute to her commitment to the field of corrections. ASCA awards the scholarship to children of correctional staff who have maintained academic excellence.

In an informal ceremony on Tuesday, Aug. 11, DOC Director Colette S. Peters presented students Samantha Belleque, Selena Ortiz, Rachael Conway, Justin Harris, and Chad Harris with the 2015 Susan M. Hunter Scholarship on behalf of ASCA.

Samantha Belleque, whose father is an Institutions Administrator for the department received a $500 scholarship. Belleque is a graduate of Blanchet Catholic School in Salem and is entering her junior year at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington, majoring in accounting. This is the third year she has been awarded a Susan M. Hunter Scholarship. (Samantha's father, Brian Belleque, accepted the award on his daughter's behalf.)

Selena Ortiz, daughter of a Correctional Officer at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF), received a $500 scholarship. Ortiz graduated from Vallivue High School in Caldwell, Idaho, in 2012. She will be starting her senior year as a transfer student at Portland State University. This is her second Susan M. Hunter Scholarship Award.

Rachael Conway, whose father is an Oregon Corrections Enterprises General Manager at CCCF, received a $1,000 scholarship. Conway graduated as the 2013 salutatorian of Reynolds High School in Troutdale. She recently returned from a semester abroad in southern France and is now starting her junior year at Linfield College in McMinnville, majoring in English and education on her way to a career in teaching.

Both Justin and Chad Harris' father is the Release Services Manager for DOC. Justin received a $500 scholarship, and Chad a $1,000 scholarship. Justin is entering his senior year at Oregon State University, where he is an Honors College student studying biology with the goal of attending medical school. This is the fourth year he has been awarded a Susan M. Hunter Scholarship. Chad is a 2015 graduate of Regis High School in Stayton. He will soon begin his freshman year at Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, Arizona, studying electrical engineering.

DOC employs 4,500 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of more than 14,600 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, direct supervision of 2,500 offenders on felony supervision in the community, and indirect supervision of another 31,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. Its mission is to promote public safety by holding offenders accountable for their actions and reducing the risk of future criminal behavior.

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Kenneth Polchowski
Kenneth Polchowski
UPDATE: Warner Creek Correctional Facility inmate walks away from fire crew - inmate back in custody (Photo) - 08/12/15
UPDATE: Kenneth Polchowski is back in custody. Medford Police arrested him today at approximately 8:30 p.m. No other details are available at this time.

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UPDATE: A more recent photo of inmate Kenneth Polchowski is attached.

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***ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW***

An inmate walked away this morning from a mobile camp at the Stouts Creek Fire near Canyonville. The Warner Creek Correctional Facility inmate was housed at the camp since July 31. Oregon State Police are investigating.

Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) staff discovered inmate Kenneth Curtis Polchowski missing today at approximately 6 a.m. after a routine count. Polchowski is a 26-year-old Caucasian male, 5 feet 10 inches tall, 180 pounds, with brown hair and blue eyes. Polchowski was last seen wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange, and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Polchowski entered DOC custody on January 29, 2015, on four counts of identity theft, one count of theft in the first degree, and one count of burglary in the first degree out of Lane County. His earliest release date is October 6, 2017.

Anyone with information regarding his whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

WCCF is a minimum-security prison in Lakeview that houses approximately 486 male inmates who are within four year of release. WCCF provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, transitional programs, religious services, and work opportunities crews. WCCF has a contact center on site through Oregon Corrections Enterprises. WCCF opened in September 2005 and is Oregon's newest operating prison. It received the State Energy Efficiency Design (SEED) award in May 2008 for its progress in design efficiency. The most energy-efficient element at WCCF is the use of geothermal energy, providing 100 percent of the hot water to the facility.

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Raymond Schuette with his visitors, Glenna and Burl Becker, and Shannon and Brian Schuette
Raymond Schuette with his visitors, Glenna and Burl Becker, and Shannon and Brian Schuette
Snake River Correctional Institution hosts annual summer luncheon (Photo) - 08/10/15
Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) held its annual summer luncheon on Friday, August 7. The event was attended by 55 inmates and 113 friends and family members.

This is the eighth year SRCI has hosted quarterly luncheons, which are designed to bring inmates and their friends and family members together for a unique visit. Slightly different from regular visiting sessions, these luncheons offer activities, as well as a chance for loved ones to share a meal together. This setting has made the summer luncheon something families look forward to attending.

"The opportunity to be together and do something as normal and routine as enjoying a meal with their families and friends is like a special occasion to those attending the luncheon," said Judy Gilmore, Acting SRCI Superintendent. "This is confirmation that we are helping to strengthen family bonds, which will be critical when these men release back to their families and communities."

SRCI's quarterly luncheons are part of an overall effort to increase visiting and family engagement at all 14 Oregon Department of Corrections prisons. Research shows that those who stay connected and receive visits while incarcerated are more likely to be successful when they release.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 male inmates. It has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. The facility opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

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OSHA Staff Cory Stengel and Larry Fipps, along with Superintendent Kimberly Hendricks, present the 5th Year SHARP Graduate award to members of the SCCI Safety Committee.
OSHA Staff Cory Stengel and Larry Fipps, along with Superintendent Kimberly Hendricks, present the 5th Year SHARP Graduate award to members of the SCCI Safety Committee.
Oregon OSHA recognizes Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (Photo) - 08/07/15
Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (SCCI) was recognized by the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA) on July 30 for graduating from the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP). The recognition represents over five years of dedicated work by members of SCCI's Safety Committee - and staff throughout the institution - who partnered with OSHA consultants to find and correct hazards, develop and implement effective safety and health programs, continuously improve, and become self-sufficient in managing occupational safety and health.

This year marks the fifth year SCCI has successfully been awarded SHARP certification, making them graduates of the extensive program. The facility joins two other Oregon Department of Corrections prisons in becoming a SHARP graduate: Two Rivers Correctional Institution in Umatilla and Warner Creek Correctional Facility in Lakeview.

SCCI is a minimum-security prison in North Bend that houses approximately 286 male inmates who are within four years of release. SCCI serves as a transition and re-entry facility and is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. Inmates work on the institution site in the physical plant, kitchen and dining hall, warehouse, receiving and discharge, laundry, and prison grounds. Inmates also work on outside crews, primarily with the Department of Forestry, providing services throughout the year as trained wildland firefighters. Originally an Air National Guard radar station, the facility was converted into a prison in 1990.

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Oregon State Penitentiary reports smoke in ventilation duct - 08/06/15
Earlier this morning, staff at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) noticed a smoking ventilation duct within the Oregon Corrections Enterprises (OCE) furniture factory; it is now smoldering. The Salem fire department responded and is currently sill on site.

Inmates, with the exception of a small number in the culinary section, have been returned to their cells and the facility is locked down. Morning visiting has been canceled and will reopen for the afternoon session. No injuries to staff or inmates have been reported, and the damage was contained to the furniture factory. Staff have accounted for all inmates.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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