Oregon Dept. of Corrections
Emergency Messages as of 7:39 pm, Fri. May. 22
No information currently posted; operating as usual.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Dept. of Corrections
Primary email address for a new account:

Emergency Alerts News Releases  
And/or follow our FlashAlerts via Twitter

About FlashAlert on Twitter:

FlashAlert utilizes the free service Twitter to distribute emergency text messages. While you are welcome to register your cell phone text message address directly into the FlashAlert system, we recommend that you simply "follow" the FlashAlert account for Oregon Dept. of Corrections by clicking on the link below and logging in to (or creating) your free Twitter account. Twitter sends messages out exceptionally fast thanks to arrangements they have made with the cell phone companies.

Click here to add Oregon Dept. of Corrections to your Twitter account or create one.

Hide this Message


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
CCCF women learn to express themselves through song - 05/20/15
Learning to express themselves through song has become possible for women at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF). The choral program is a partnership between CCCF and the Intergenerational Outreach Choirs Corporation (IOCC) based in Portland.

Every Sunday, 30 minimum-custody women leave their prison personas and enter a musical world to raise their voices to create harmony and peace in their lives. The women who are part of the choir say there are many benefits to being a part of this musical experience. In addition to learning how to read music, advantages include the therapeutic value, acceptance, teamwork, and the ability to belong to something.

Crystal Akins, choir director, says her vision is to create a choir that will help the women transition through integrating them into a supportive singing community once they release from prison. Right now, though, she and Amy Vanacove, the accompanist, are preparing the singers for their first concert.

IOCC is a nonprofit agency with service choirs in schools, churches, community centers, assisted living homes, and hospitals. Its vision is to establish choirs for all genders, ages, and life circumstances to create a family of outreach choirs that continue to connect generations through song.

CCCF is a multi-custody prison in Wilsonville accommodating all of Oregon's female inmates (approximately 1,260). The prison has cell and dormitory housing, inmate work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state's intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all inmates committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 male inmates. CCCF's minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

####
2015 award ceremony honors DOC outstanding employees - 05/20/15
On May 13, 2015, over 100 staff members, contractors, and volunteers from the Oregon Department of Corrections were recognized for their exceptional efforts in 2014. The statewide awards ceremony is held annually to honor these individuals as part of National Correctional Officers and Employees Week (NCEW). A sampling of award recipients is included below. For a full list of award recipients, visit http://www.oregon.gov/doc/docs/pdf/2015StatewideAwards.pdf.

* DOC Employee of the Year - Birdie Worley, Rules Coordinator
* DOC Manager of the Year - Maureen Robb, Linn County Community Corrections Director
* DOC Officers of the Year - Correctional Officer Kevin Karpati (Snake River Correctional Institution) and Corporal Joe Howell (Oregon State Correctional Institution)
* Community Corrections Outstanding Service Award - Leticia Longoria-Navarro, Multnomah County Parole and Probation Officer
* Community Corrections Employee of the Year - Bev Mills, Linn County Community Corrections Office Specialist
* Human Resources Employee of the Year - Patricia Solomon, Administrative Specialist 2
* Human Resources Manager of the Year - Debbie Navarro, HR Generalist
* General Services Division Employee of the Year - Joan Brooks, Accountant

* General Services Division Manager of the Year - Greg Nash, Accounting and Payroll Manager
* Director's Office Manager of the Year - Adrianne O'Connor, Internal Audit Administrator
* Operations Division Employee of the Year - Dwight Hawkins, Inmate Work Programs Coordinator
* Operations Division Manager of the Year - Patti Knight, Health Services Manager
* Operations Division (Central Administration) Employee of the Year - Jon Bricker, Transport Sergeant
* Operations (Central Administration) Manager of the Year - Kelley Morton, Policy Manager

* Offender Management and Rehabilitation Division Contractor of the Year - Deb Brown, Program Manager, New Directions Northwest
* Offender Management and Rehabilitation Division Employee of the Year - Karen Roddy, Victims Services Program Coordinator
* Offender Management and Rehabilitation Division Manager of the Year - Theresa Arendell, Transition and Inmate Services Manager
* Oregon Corrections Enterprises Employee of the Year Award - John Kilander, Laundry Production Coordinator
* Oregon Corrections Enterprises Manager of the Year Award - Barb Cannard, Offender Services Program Manager
* Outstanding Volunteer - Katina Saint Marie and Sue Gerhardt, The Portia Project (Coffee Creek Correctional Facility)
* Outstanding Volunteer - Debbie Arvidson, Quilting Project (Snake River Correctional Institution)
* Outstanding Citizen - Doris Wehler, Wilsonville Rotary
* Outstanding Citizen - Karen Yeakley, Powder River Correctional Facility Advisory Council
* Humanitarian Award - Lisa Blacketter, Correctional Counselor
* Max Williams Award - Jef Van Valkenburgh, Department of Justice Senior Assistant Attorney General

Each award winner was presented with a plaque and certificate at the awards ceremony. They were praised for going above and beyond, improving outcomes, and serving as role models for both inmates and other staff members.

For more detailed information on the award recipients, please contact Betty Bernt or Elizabeth Craig.

DOC employs 4,500 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of over 14,500 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, and direct or indirect supervision of 32,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. DOC is recognized nationally among correctional agencies for providing adults in custody with the cognitive, education, and job skills needed to become productive citizens when they transition back to their communities.

###
Completed flags, ready for installation
Completed flags, ready for installation
New artwork installed at Columbia River Correctional Institution (Photo) - 05/19/15
Columbia River Correctional Institution (CRCI) will dedicate a new, site-specific art piece - 30 FLAGS - on May 26 at 1 p.m. CRCI inmates created the piece with artist Emily Squires and scholar-activist Reiko Hillyer. Speakers will include Superintendent Rick Angelozzi, a representative(s) from the workshop, and the artists. RSVPs by May 22 to Emily Squires (contact info listed below) are required to attend this event.

Dedication Ceremony
Tuesday, May 26, 1-2 p.m.
Columbia River Correctional Institution
9111 NE Sunderland Ave., Portland, OR 97211
You must RSVP to attend.

Since October, Squires has been an artist-in-residence at CRCI. In partnership with Know Your City and scholar-activist Hillyer, Squires collaborated with adults in custody to design, screen print, and install a series of handmade flags throughout the institution. The flags are installed at the entryway into CRCI, throughout the main hallway of CRCI, and every artist mailed a set to someone of their choosing on the outside.

During weekly art workshops - bookmaking, drawing, and collage - the group discussed the concept of "place." Through thinking about the specificity and regulations of "inside" (CRCI as an institution, the interior rooms and exterior yard, the bunk) versus the physical and emotional dislocation from "outside" (Portland, home, location prior to incarceration), the group identified different audiences: fellow adults in custody, people that can come and go (volunteers, staff, or family) and external communities. They designed flags using both image and text to carry messages of their choosing based on their lived experiences. Approximately 12 artists created 30 unique designs, each 7" x 9". Hundreds of screen-printed flags were sewn into long strands that can be hung as a complete set (picture flags flying above a car lot or Tibetan prayer flags).

For more details about the project, see contact information listed below. To RSVP for the event, email Emily Squires at emily.squires@gmail.com or call 314.650.9934 by May 22, 2015.

30 FLAGS is made possible through the generous support of the Vital Projects Fund.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
Emily Squires is an artist and educator currently living in Portland. Her multidisciplinary practice investigates themes such as voice, participation, and love (www.emilysquires.com). Reiko Hillyer is an Assistant Professor of History at Lewis & Clark College.


ABOUT CRCI
Columbia River Correctional Institution is a 593-bed minimum-security prison located in northeast Portland. The institution opened in September 1990 and houses male inmates who are within four years of release. The focus of Columbia River is to prepare adults in custody for successful re-entry into their communities by offering release planning and programs. Approximately 50 inmates are housed in a separate living area designed specifically for use as a residential alcohol and drug treatment program, and another unit is dedicated to a 61-bed Alternative Incarceration Program; in both units, adults in custody voluntarily participate in therapeutic community programs designed to address serious addiction and substance abuse issues.

ABOUT KNOW YOUR CITY
Know Your City engages the public in art and social justice through creative placemaking projects. Their programs and publications aim to educate people to better know their communities, and to empower them to take action.

###
Suspicious powder received at Oregon State Penitentiary determined not hazardous - 04/29/15
Emergency responders determined that a white powdery substance received Monday afternoon in an envelope at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) mail room was not hazardous.

On April 29 at 1:05 p.m., the OSP mail room reported receiving the envelope with the unknown substance. The mail room area was secured. The Oregon State Police Hazardous Materials Unit, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Salem Fire and Rescue responded to evaluate the powder for any hazardous substances.

The mail room is located in a separate building on the grounds of OSP. One staff member had direct exposure and was taken to Salem Hospital. One other staff member was in the mail room at the time the substance was found, but had no direct contact. The institution is operating as normal.

OSP is a maximum-security prison in Salem that houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

####
Daniel Oliver Fullmer
Daniel Oliver Fullmer
Shutter Creek Correctional Institution inmate Harlan Brown back in custody (Photo) - 04/27/15
An inmate who escaped April 26 from Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (SCCI) in North Bend is now in custody in the Coos County Jail. Law enforcement officials arrested Harlan Earl Brown on Monday morning at approximately 10:30 a.m. near Coos Bay.

Brown is the second of two Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmates who escaped Sunday morning from SCCI in North Bend. Daniel Oliver Fullmer was apprehended at approximately 1:30 a.m. this morning.

Brown entered DOC custody on Aug. 8, 2014, on two counts of burglary in the second degree and three counts of theft in the first degree out of Clackamas County. His earliest release date is Nov. 9, 2016.

###
Harlan Earl Brown
Harlan Earl Brown
Shutter Creek Correctional Institution inmate Daniel Fullmer back in custody (Photo) - 04/27/15
An inmate who escaped April 26 from Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (SCCI) in North Bend is now in custody in the Coos County Jail. Law enforcement officials arrested Daniel Oliver Fullmer on Monday morning at approximately 1:30 a.m. near Lakeside.

Fullmer was one of two Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmates who escaped Sunday morning from SCCI in North Bend. He entered DOC custody on Oct. 16, 2014, on one count of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and one count of possession of methamphetamine out of Jackson County. His earliest release date is March 22, 2016.

The second inmate, Harlan Earl Brown, is still at large. Brown is a 44-year-old Caucasian male, 5 feet 8 inches tall, 185 pounds, with brown hair and hazel eyes. At the time of his escape, he was wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange (or red shorts), and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Brown entered DOC custody on Aug. 8, 2014, on two counts of burglary in the second degree and three counts of theft in the first degree out of Clackamas County. His earliest release date is Nov. 9, 2016.

Anyone with information regarding Brown's whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

###
Daniel Oliver Fullmer
Daniel Oliver Fullmer
Two inmates escape from Shutter Creek Correctional Institution in North Bend (Photo) - 04/26/15
Two Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmates escaped Sunday morning from Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (SCCI) in North Bend. Oregon State Police, Coos County County Sheriff's Office, and the Douglas County Sheriff's Office K-9 Unit are responding.

SCCI staff discovered inmates Harlan Earl Brown and Daniel Oliver Fullmer missing at approximately 7:45 a.m., Sunday, April 26, after they did not check in for scheduled medical appointments. Staff found footprints near a section of the facility's boundary fence, indicating the two inmates escaped over the fence.

Brown is a 44-year-old Caucasian male, 5 feet 8 inches tall, 185 pounds, with brown hair and hazel eyes. Fullmer is a 39-year-old Caucasian male, 5 feet 8 inches tall, 165 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes. They are most likely wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange (or red shorts), and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Brown entered DOC custody on Aug. 8, 2014, on two counts of burglary in the second degree and three counts of theft in the first degree out of Clackamas County. His earliest release date is Nov. 9, 2016. Fullmer entered DOC custody on Oct. 16, 2014, on one count of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and one count of possession of methamphetamine out of Jackson County. His earliest release date is March 22, 2016.

Anyone with information regarding Brown and Fullmer's whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

SCCI is a minimum-security prison in North Bend that houses approximately 286 male inmates who are within four years of release. SCCI serves as a transition and re-entry facility and is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. Inmates work on the institution site in the physical plant, kitchen and dining hall, warehouse, receiving and discharge, laundry, and prison grounds. Inmates also work on outside crews, primarily with the Department of Forestry, providing services throughout the year as trained wildland firefighters. Originally an Air National Guard radar station, the facility was converted into a prison in 1990.

###