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News Releases
Eldridge McCoy Maready
Eldridge McCoy Maready
Deer Ridge Correctional Institution reports inmate death (Photo) - 11/17/16

***CLARIFICATION***Mr. Maready passed away Wednesday afternoon, November 16, at approximately 2:30 p.m.***


An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmate died unexpectedly early Tuesday morning at Deer Ridge Correctional Institution (DRCI) in Madras. As with all unanticipated deaths in state prisons, the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigations Unit is conducting an investigation.

At approximately 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, November 16, inmate Eldridge Maready, 80, collapsed in a day room. DRCI staff immediately administered CPR, and Maready was taken off-site for medical care. He was pronounced deceased at 3:23 p.m.

Maready entered DOC custody January 31, 2012, on one count of manslaughter in the second degree out of Lane County. His earliest release date was February 5, 2018.

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

DRCI is a multi-custody prison located four miles east of Madras in central Oregon. This men's prison contains 644 minimum-security beds and 1,223 medium-security beds. The minimum facility began receiving inmates in September 2007. The medium facility has not received inmates due to cost saving measures. DRCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including, education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, cognitive programs, and inmate work crews.



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Attached Media Files: Eldridge McCoy Maready
DOC Receives Vera Safe Alternatives to Segregation Report - 11/15/16

Today, Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) announced the receipt of a report by the Vera Institute of Justice (Vera), which provides analysis of the Oregon's use of segregation--also known as special housing--and recommendations for reducing its use. DOC is reviewing the report and developing a plan to address the findings and implement the recommendations.

In 2015, with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, DOC partnered with the Vera Institute of Justice as part of Vera's national Safe Alternatives to Segregation Initiative to reduce its reliance on segregation. Oregon was one of five corrections systems selected in a competitive bidding process to participate in the initiative, which will soon expand to up to five additional systems.

Over the past year, Vera conducted an assessment of the department's current use of special housing, and based on that assessment, recommended strategies to reduce its reliance on this practice through using alternative responses to institutional behavior, changing the environment in segregation, successfully reintegrating people back into the general prison population, and targeting strategies for particularly vulnerable populations such as people with a mental illness.

DOC Director Colette S. Peters stated, "In Oregon, we began taking steps to analyze our use of special housing nearly two years ago. We have made this one of our top agency initiatives. As part of this initiative, Oregon was one of five states selected to participate in the Vera Institute of Justice's Safe Alternatives to Segregation initiative. We look forward to our continued work with Vera and their recommendations about how we can collectively work to reduce the use of special housing."

"Vera has been pleased to partner with Oregon's DOC since May 2015 in their efforts to safely reduce reliance on segregated housing," said Sara Sullivan, project manager of Vera's Safe Alternatives to Segregation Initiative. "We have been inspired by their commitment to understanding their use of this practice and to pursuing alternatives that are safer and more effective for people who are in prison, the staff who work there, and our larger communities. The lessons learned from the work in Oregon will be valuable to other jurisdictions who are making changes to their own practices."

This report presents the findings of Vera's assessment in Oregon. In the spring, Vera will publish a summary report with findings and recommendations from all five of the jurisdictions participating in the Safe Alternatives to Segregation Initiative.

DOC employs 4,500 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of over 14,500 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, and direct or indirect supervision of 32,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. DOC is recognized nationally among correctional agencies for providing adults in custody with the cognitive, education, and job skills needed to become productive citizens when they transition back to their communities.

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Assistant Inspector General Gary Ninman
Assistant Inspector General Gary Ninman
DOC announces leadership changes (Photo) - 11/08/16

Colette S. Peters, Director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC), recently announced three changes to the DOC management team, effective November 15.

Named were Corey Fhuere as Superintendent of Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (SCCI) in North Bend, Sue Washburn as Superintendent of Powder River Correctional Facility (PRCF) in Baker City, and Gary Ninman as Assistant Inspector General out of the Salem headquarters.

Fhuere began his corrections career in 1990 as a Correctional Officer (CO) at, what was then, the Parole Violators Prison in North Bend. He transferred to SCCI as a CO in 1992 and promoted through the ranks serving at SCCI, Oregon State Correctional Institution (OSCI), and Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI). Other positions held by Fhuere include Special Investigations Inspector III with the Inspector General's Office, Transport Lieutenant, SCCI Institution Security Manager, and most recently statewide Transport Manager. Fhuere holds an associate of arts degree in soil management from the University Of Nebraska School Of Technical Agriculture. He served four years in the Nebraska Army National Guard, three years Active duty in the Navy, and three years in the Oregon Army National Guard.

Washburn began her career with the Department of Corrections in May of 2005, as the Human Resource Manager for Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI). In 2011, she became Food Services Manager at TRCI. In January of 2016, Washburn became the Acting Assistant Superintendent of General Services at TRCI. Prior to DOC, she worked with Blue Mountain Community College and served many years in public safety. She has a background in finance, human resources, and public safety management. Washburn attended both Portland State University and Eastern Oregon University obtaining certification in Human Resource Management and Public Safety Management.

Ninman began his career as an EMT Firefighter with the California Department of Forestry as a crewmember of a firefighting helicopter. He then served with the California Highway Patrol as a patrol officer, flight officer, training officer, Presidential Protection Motor Officer, Fatal Accident Investigation Team, and several other special duty assignments. In 2006, Ninman moved to Oregon as a Fraud Investigator for the SAIF Corporation, accepting a position with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) as a Tactical and Emergency Vehicle Operation Instructor in 2008. At DPSST, he also served as Tactical and Scenario Coordinator, Captain, and most recently as Training Division Supervisor. Ninman has been a long time leadership and ethics instructor for public safety officials in Oregon.

DOC employs 4,500 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of over 14,500 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, and direct or indirect supervision of 32,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. DOC is recognized nationally among correctional agencies for providing adults in custody with the cognitive, education, and job skills needed to become productive citizens when they transition back to their communities.

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