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News Releases
Brandon Smithson
Brandon Smithson
Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo) - 12/07/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Brandon Sean Smithson died on December 6, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI). He passed away at a Portland area hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. 

Brandon Sean Smithson entered DOC custody on June 4, 1999 from Multnomah County. His earliest release date was July 31, 2025. He was 45 years old. 

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. Next of kin has been notified.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 male inmates. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

Attached Media Files: Brandon Smithson
Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution Announces New Superintendent - 12/03/18

Today, Colette S. Peters, Director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC), announced changes to the DOC Leadership Team. Sue Washburn, will be the new Superintendent of Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution (EOCI). She will begin this role on Monday, December 10, 2018. Brigitte Amsberry, current EOCI Superintendent, is retiring at the end of this month. We would like to thank Ms. Amsberry for her long career at DOC.

In 2005, Sue began her DOC career as the Human Resources Manager for Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI). In 2011, she became the work-out-of-class Food Services Manager for TRCI, permanently promoting into that position in 2012. In January of 2016, Sue became the Acting Assistant Superintendent of General Services at TRCI. Most recently, she was the Superintendent of Powder River Correctional Facility (PRCF). Sue attended both Portland State University and Eastern Oregon University, obtaining certifications in Human Resource Management and Public Safety Management.

Sue stated, “I look forward to joining the amazing team at EOCI, meeting community members, and supporting all the employees, contractors and volunteers. These individuals give their all to keep both the institution and the community safe.   While I have sincerely been blessed to work at Powder River Correctional Facility and will miss the people and this community, it is my honor and privilege to begin this new adventure.”

In the coming weeks, DOC will open a recruitment for Superintendent of PRCF. In the meantime, Thomas McLay, currently the Institution Security Manager, will be Acting Superintendent of PRCF.

EOCI is a multi-custody prison located in Pendleton that houses over 1,700 male inmates. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues©, whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and inmate work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first inmates in June 1985.

Darrick William Roberts
Darrick William Roberts
Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo) - 11/28/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Darrick William Roberts died on November 23, 2018. He was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) and passed away at a local hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Darrick William Roberts entered DOC custody on September 27, 2018 from Jackson County.  His earliest release date was November 4, 2021. He was 53 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. Next of kin has been notified.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 male inmates. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, inmates with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

Attached Media Files: Darrick William Roberts
David Lon Humphrey
David Lon Humphrey
Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo) - 11/26/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, David Lon Humphrey died on November 22, 2018. He was incarcerated at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution (EOCI) and passed away in the institution’s end of life care program. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

David Lon Humphrey entered DOC custody on March 18, 2014 from Lincoln County.  His earliest release date was December 9, 2018. He was 66 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. Next of kin has been notified.

EOCI is a multi-custody prison located in Pendleton that houses over 1,700 male inmates. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues©, whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and inmate work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first inmates in June 1985.

Attached Media Files: David Lon Humphrey
Tattoo after laser treatment
Tattoo after laser treatment
Changing Lives by Removing Tattoos at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (Photo) - 11/19/18

Tattoos can be reminders of the past and a lifestyle that is best left behind. For the women housed at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) they have the opportunity to start anew as they transition towards becoming members of our community.

In March of this year, the Department of Corrections (DOC) in partnership with Portland Community College (PCC) began a tattoo removal program at CCCF. Tammy Kennedy, a PCC leader who contracts with the institution, runs this potentially life-changing initiative along with the CCCF hair design program. Ms. Kennedy has a certificate in Advanced Esthetics, which she pursued in part, to bring additional treatment, skills, training and certification options to the incarcerated women.

As she operates the tattoo removal laser she says, “Many of these women come to our facilities with anti-social tattoos. Whether they are gang, drug or domestic abuse related tattoos, helping them remove that part of their past is rewarding work. Many of these tattoos were directly related to what brought them here. What they once thought was permanent can now be a thing of the past.”

One incarcerated woman wrote about her tattoo removal experience, “For 22 years, I’ve had a shackle around my ankle, the permanent brand of a past abusive relationship that I’ve had to be reminded of every day as I put on my shoes. The tattoo removal program that you brought to Coffee Creek is changing that.”

To date, 362 people have been treated and approximately 750 tattoos have been, or are in the process of, being removed. The longer term objective is to bring tattoo removal to the men incarcerated, as well.

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating all of Oregon’s female inmates (approximately 1,260). The prison has cell and dormitory housing, inmate work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all inmates committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 male inmates. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.