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Santiam Park Fire 100% lined, 189 acres (Photo) - 03/21/19

Lyons, Ore. – The Santiam Park Fire, reported Tuesday afternoon near the North Santiam State Recreational Area off Highway 22, is 100 percent lined and remains at 189 acres.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation. No structures have been lost and no injuries reported.

Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Command transitioned Incident Commanders today, with Allison Blair stepping in for Blake Ellis.  

“Taking over the fire as Incident Commander at this stage is very humbling,” Blair said, “seeing the dedication of our firefighters and staff reminds us why we’re here; to ensure we leave the land in the best, safest condition for the landowners. This isn’t the glamorous part of the job, but it is vital to the community we serve.”

Favorable weather conditions are aiding over 100 personnel in fire suppression efforts. Today, crews from Coffee Creek Female Correctional Facility and the Willamette National Forest joined ODF and private contract crews on the fire line. Focused on finding and extinguishing hot spots and strengthening containment lines, crews are steadily progressing toward the interior of the fire.

Given much of the fire is in a high public use area, rehabilitating the land for future public use is a priority and a practice in good stewardship.

Resources engaged on the fire include 4 engines, 2 tenders, a dozer and multiple hand crews. The Type 2 helicopter used during initial and extended attack was released late Wednesday afternoon to Washington Department of Natural Resources.  

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Corrected: Santiam Park Fire 80% lined, 189 acres, all evacuations lifted (Photo) - 03/20/19

Corrected to clarify ALL evacuations have been lifted.

Lyons, Ore. – The Santiam Park Fire, reported Tuesday afternoon near the North Santiam State Recreational Area off Highway 22, is currently 80 percent lined, with all evacuation levels lifted.

Unified command, consisting of the Oregon Department of Forestry, Linn County Sheriff’s Office, and Lyons Fire Department, made today’s objective clear for crews; fight fire aggressively and safely. With improved weather conditions, crews were able to meet that objective, building upon and strengthening containment lines. Crews continue to work on mop-up, locating and extinguishing hot spots, and falling snags. At the time of this release, no structures have been lost and no injuries reported.

“Some folks seem surprised to see this fire on the landscape in March,” said Incident Commander Blake Ellis, “but as firefighters, we are trained to consider the conditions, not the calendar. The dedication of the local fire departments and crews combined with the involvement and support of the local community continues to impress me.”  

After successful initial attack and reduced fire activity, ground crews were able to walk the line with GPS, obtaining a more accurate perimeter line, mapping the fire at 189 acres. With no significant fire growth since yesterday, the increased acres reported are a direct result of improved mapping in steep and rugged terrain.

As of 5:00 pm today, evacuation levels in both counties have been lifted.

Approximately 85 personnel are currently engaged on the fire, including crews from ODF, Lyons Fire Department, Mill City Fire Department, Sublimity Fire Department, and other local agencies. Resources involved include a Type 2 helicopter as well as multiple dozers and engines.

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Santiam Park Fire at 60 acres, evacuations in place (Photo) - 03/19/19

Lyons, Ore. -- A fire reported Tuesday afternoon near the North Santiam State Recreational Area off Highway 22 has grown to an estimated 60 acres as of Tuesday evening, with evacuations ordered for nearby homes.

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is in unified command with the Lyons Fire Department and the Linn County Sheriff’s Office on the Santiam Park Fire. Pushed by strong east winds, the fire jumped the Santiam River and is approximately 20 percent lined.

Level 3 “GO” evacuations are in place for residents west of Neighbor’s Lane, including 25th Avenue, River Loop, and Oak Lane. Approximately 35 homes and 30 outbuildings are currently threatened, but no structures have been lost. The Red Cross has identified Mari-Linn Elementary School as an evacuation center.

"Our partners at the local level along with our ODF resources have done an outstanding job during initial attack today" said ODF Incident Commander, Blake Ellis, "we appreciate the teamwork of all agencies involved."

Crews from ODF, Lyons Fire Department, Mill City Fire Department, Sublimity Fire Department, and other local agencies were engaged in extended attack and expect to return in the morning. Resources involved include a Type 2 helicopter as well as multiple dozers and engines.

For more information on evacuations, contact the Linn County Sheriff’s Office at 541-967-3950.

Mari-Linn Elementary School is following normal procedures for notification regarding potential school closure for tomorrow, Wednesday, March 20.

North Santiam State Recreateion Area is closed.

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Attached Media Files: Santiam_Park_Fire_IA_fire.jpg
Forestry department invites public comment on state forest management activities - 03/18/19

Salem, Ore. -- The Oregon Department of Forestry is inviting public comment on planned projects, timber sales and other management activities in state-owned forests in fiscal year 2020.

Starting today, March 18, through 5 p.m. on May 2, 2019, Oregonians can weigh in on draft Annual Operations Plans (AOPs) for state forests, which lay out on-the-ground activities expected to take place in the coming fiscal year. State forests by law must provide economic, environmental and social benefits to Oregonians, and are managed under long-range Forest Management Plans and Implementation Plans. Annual Operations Plans implement activities towards goals and strategies laid out in these longer-range plans. The draft AOP summary documents can be viewed online at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Working/Pages/StateForests.aspx and are also available at district offices upon request.

Common topics included in an Annual Operations Plan include:

  • Timber harvest operations
  • Recreation improvement and maintenance projects
  • Forest road construction, maintenance, and improvements
  • Reforestation/replanting and young stand management activities
  • Habitat improvement for native species
  • Invasive species management

The most useful input speaks to these specific activities and whether they are consistent with longer-range plans, offers suggestions to improve efficiency or effectiveness, corrects errors, provides additional information, and is solution-oriented, understanding that state forests are working forests and by law must provide a variety of economic, environmental and social benefits. Activities that affect fish and wildlife habitat are reviewed by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, while operations that may influence threatened and endangered species are shared with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  

ODF is offering several convenient avenues to comment on AOPs:

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Smokey Bear Low Plate Numbers: Bid it to Win it! (Photo) - 03/15/19

A new Smokey Bear license plate is coming to Oregon on August 1, 2019! Using Ebay, Keep Oregon Green (KOG) will soon auction off low numbers SB 00002 through SB 00020. KOG will start the bidding on Sunday, March 17, 2019 at noon with SB 00020. The next number (SB 00019) will be auctioned the following Sunday, March 24th. KOG will conduct these low number auctions each week until the last low number (SB 00002) is sold in July. The funds generated from the auction will benefit the Keep Oregon Green Association, whose mission is to promote healthy landscapes and safe communities by educating the public of everyone’s shared responsibility to prevent human-caused wildfires.

 

If you plan to bid on a low number, please keep in mind that the bidder must qualify for Oregon registration. The plate has to be issued to a passenger vehicle. You do not need to have purchased a Smokey Bear voucher to participate in this auction.

 

Keep Oregon Green cannot technically auction the plate itself, only the low number that appears on the plate. DMV issues the Smokey Bear plate, so any association with DMV fees, requirements, etc. are kept completely separate from this auction. The $40 surcharge or any other DMV plate-related fees are not a part of the auction amount. If winners get a low number and already have a voucher, DMV has your information and will send a letter indicating what is needed to apply and pay for the plate once they are available for purchase. DMV will also send similar letters to winners who have not pre-paid for a voucher. 

 

DMV is not involved in the auction, but the list of winners will be turned over to DMV and accounted for in their system. Once the auction is complete, Keep Oregon Green will provide DMV with the names, addresses, license, and vehicle information to include on the list. DMV will handle all tasks related to issuance of the plate, including sending a letter to the “winners” with the fees and application information.

 

To reiterate, Keep Oregon Green is not auctioning Smokey Bear plates, but rather a chance to reserve a low plate number from 00002-00020. Aside from these 19 numbers, all other plate numbers are first-come, first-served. Keep Oregon Green and DMV do not reserve any other configurations, only the 19 numbers that Keep Oregon Green has designated.

 

For further information about the low number auction and questions, please visit www.keeporegongreen.org.

 

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Open house on possible Habitat Conservation Plan in state forests set for March 21 - 03/12/19

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is hosting a public kick-off meeting on Thursday, March 21, providing an opportunity to learn more about a potential Habitat Conservation Plan for state forestlands west of the Cascades.

The Western Oregon HCP Kick-Off Meeting is an opportunity for interested parties to learn about the HCP process and timeline, meet the agencies and other stakeholders engaged in the effort, ask questions and provide comments. This event is open to the public. Information available will include the timeline and milestones, species being considered for HCP coverage, and how agencies and stakeholders can be involved in the process. This meeting is the first of many anticipated future opportunities to engage in the HCP and is meant as a high-level overview and introduction to the process. Please note that the Elliott State Forest, which is no longer managed by ODF, is not part of this process.

  • Date: Thursday, March 21
  • Time: 1 – 3 p.m. meeting, followed by an informal meet-n-greet from 3–4 p.m. with the project team.
  • Where: Broadway Commons, 1300 Broadway St. NE, Salem OR 97301
  • RSVP: In-person attendance is encouraged. A link to view the presentation and listen to meeting audio online will be posted on the HCP project page.

Please RSVP: This meeting is open to the public and primarily intended for those with an interest in management of Oregon’s forests. RSVP is requested.

Background: Oregon’s state forests provide habitat for a variety of species, including some listed as endangered or threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. An HCP can serve as a more holistic and cost-effective way to comply with the Endangered Species Act. The Board of Forestry has directed ODF to consider an HCP. ODF is currently underway with the HCP process, in collaboration with technical and policy guidance from other state and federal agencies. ODF is also seeking stakeholder engagement in this early phase of HCP consideration. 

Accommodations for persons with disabilities and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF's Public Affairs office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

Controlled burns help remove woody fuels from forests after timber harvests. New rules governing the smoke from such forest burns have taken effect in Oregon in time for the spring burning season.
Controlled burns help remove woody fuels from forests after timber harvests. New rules governing the smoke from such forest burns have taken effect in Oregon in time for the spring burning season.
New rules governing smoke from controlled forest burns take effect in time for spring burning season (Photo) - 03/07/19

SALEM, Ore. – Revised rules that protect air quality in areas of Oregon susceptible to smoke from controlled forest burns have gone into effect just as the spring burning season gets underway. The new rules were adopted in January by the Oregon Board of Forestry and approved by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, following a multi-year review process by a broad-based committee.

The rules call on communities at risk for smoke to voluntarily develop response plans to protect especially vulnerable populations, such as children, the elderly and people with heart and respiratory conditions. ODF and DEQ will collaborate with the Oregon Health Authority to identify communities ready to begin developing a response plan this year.

ODF Smoke Management Program Manager Nick Yonker said, “Response plans will detail how communities will be notified when unhealthy levels of smoke are expected. They will also outline how community officials in turn will notify residents so they can take specific actions to protect themselves and their children, such as bringing physical education classes indoors.”

Michael Orman, manager of Air Quality Planning at the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, said the plans will help reduce the impacts of smoke to residents, whether it is from a controlled burn or a wildfire. “Prescribed fire is one of the many tools used to reduce the wildfire risks posed by forest fuel. When used properly, the smoke management program has a history of completing burn objectives while preventing smoke from entering communities, and DEQ expects this trend to continue. These new rules identify key elements that community plans should include, like smoke risks and what actions people can take to protect their health,” he said.

The Oregon Health Authority’s Chronic Disease Programs Manager Kirsten Aird said that communities can tailor their plans based on the severity and duration of smoke, and on what resources they are willing to commit. “One community might designate certain buildings as temporary clean-air spaces for the public, while another might develop a way to get air cleaners to highly vulnerable residents,” she said. “As communities complete their plans we’ll work to share those with other communities as potential models to consider.”

The revised rules continue to meet federal air quality standards, but now tie the definition of a smoke intrusion to specific levels of smoke particulates considered unhealthy for vulnerable populations during two time periods – a one-hour average and a 24-hour average. They replace the former definition, which was zero visible smoke.

“The rule revisions provide greater flexibility for those wanting to use controlled burns to improve the health of fire-adapted forestland,” said Yonker. “And they should increase the opportunities for landowners to reduce wildfire risk near communities by thinning overcrowded forests and burning the woody debris.”

The rule changes follow an 18-month review of the Smoke Management Program by a 20-person appointed committee made up of forest landowners, public health representatives, the American Lung Association, forest collaboratives and environmentalist groups, county and city elected officials, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management and a tribal representative.

According to ODF records, in 2018 controlled fires were set on 181,282 acres in Oregon, above the 10-year annual average of 165,999 acres. Those fires burned an estimated 1.3 million tons of woody debris. Peak prescribed burning is in the spring and fall when wildfire risk is low.

Learn more about controlled burning from the Oregon Department of Forestry website at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Burn.aspx

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Committee for Family Forestlands meets March 19 in Salem - 03/07/19

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Tuesday, March 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Salem. The meeting will be in the Santiam Room of Building D on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street.  Among updates the committee will receive are ones about:

  • bark beetles
  • current legislation, including one allowing a second dwelling unit on family forestland
  • a report on farms and forests
  • the marbled murrelet rule analysis

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.  

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at 

https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to Monmouth to help raise awareness of Arbor Week and tree plantings - 03/06/19

MONMOUTH, Ore. — Oregon Community Trees is helping Monmouth celebrate Arbor Week this April and in coming years with a grant toward the purchase of a reusable banner and an A-frame to display at future tree plantings.

Suzanne Dufner with the City of Monmouth said the town celebrates Arbor Week each year with events to increase public awareness of Monmouth’s Tree City USA status, something she said the banner will help with.

“We also encourage residents to plant more trees and volunteer for local tree planting activities, so the A-frame sign will help identify those events for people wishing to attend,” said Dufner.

Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen said Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. “We assist community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry,” Holen said.

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status Monmouth has enjoyed for 17 years.

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to Cottage Grove help it celebrate 25 years as a Tree City USA in April - 03/06/19

COTTAGE GROVE, Ore. — Oregon Community Trees is helping Cottage Grove mark its 25th year as a Tree City USA with a reusable banner drawing attention to the city’s Arbor Week celebration, planned for Saturday, April 20.

Cottage Grove Tree Board Member Eric Mongan said the event will provide an opportunity for residents to help plant trees and set a commemorative plaque in Coiner Park. “Local nurseries, tree service providers and master gardeners will be on hand along with the Mayor to help explain proper planting techniques and maintenance tips,” said Mongan.

“The event will also help us kick off a citywide street tree inventory project,” Mongan added. “That inventory will lay the groundwork for a review of our approved street tree list and help the city prepare for invasive tree-killing diseases and pests, such as the emerald ash borer.”

Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen said Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. “We assist community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry,” Holen said.

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status Corvallis has held for a quarter century.

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Smaller than a fingernail, Douglas-fir beetles are attracted to Douglas-firs downed in winter storms. From there they can move on to infest stands of living Douglas-fir trees. Landowners have until April to either remove downed Douglas-firs or apply a phe
Smaller than a fingernail, Douglas-fir beetles are attracted to Douglas-firs downed in winter storms. From there they can move on to infest stands of living Douglas-fir trees. Landowners have until April to either remove downed Douglas-firs or apply a phe
Douglas-fir pest outbreak looms in Lane County next month if storm-toppled Douglas-firs aren't removed (Photo) - 03/05/19

SALEM, Ore. — This winter’s heavy snow and wind have knocked down many trees across Lane County, as many as 1,000 per mile in the Highway 58 corridor according to media reports citing Willamette National Forest sources.  This has created perfect conditions in the county for an outbreak of Douglas-fir beetle unless landowners act quickly to either remove the downed or damaged trees or apply an insect pheromone to drive away the pest.

Forest Entomologist Christine Buhl is with the Oregon Department of Forestry. Buhl said that while the beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) is native to the Northwest, its population can soar when living large-diameter Douglas-fir trees are thrown to the ground.

“Normally this pest is scattered on the landscape wherever Douglas-fir grows,” said Buhl. “However, they tend to concentrate in tree stands where there has been a lot of wind damage.”

Buhl said beetle population booms can follow storms that cause blowdown.

Tell-tale signs of this beetle’s presence include frass. This is sawdust-like material the beetle ejects from their galleries underneath the tree’s bark, Buhl explained.

“The beetles first attack downed Douglas-firs and then move to nearby standing trees that are stressed, injured or less vigorous,” said Buhl. “Attacked trees that cannot drown out infesting beetles with pitch die and turn red the same year as the attack or the next spring.”

Buhl said landowners can prevent Douglas-fir beetle outbreaks by removing large-diameter downed trees before the insects take flight in the spring looking for new homes.

“Before April remove any downed Douglas-firs greater than 10 inches in diameter at a point around chest height,” she advised. “Trees with low vigor should also be removed to reduce stand susceptibility to outbreaks. Large amounts of cull trees created by logging also should not be left on site, particularly in shade.”

Buhl said the beetles will generally not attack trees that have been dead for over a year.

“If removal is delayed or not possible,” said Buhl, “apply the repellant pheromone called MCH to prevent infestation.”

A naturally occurring beetle repellent, MCH (methylcyclohexenone), can be applied to downed logs or standing green trees to prevent Douglas-fir beetle attacks. Buhl said MCH pouches are most often applied in a grid pattern within a stand to effectively deter infestation. Beetles approaching treated areas are fooled by the pheromone into sensing that beetles already occupy the site and will pass it by.

“This technique is useful in parks, camps or habitat conservation areas where salvage is not possible, but there is a desire to preserve the remaining standing trees,” said Buhl. “It’s also helpful in forestlands where downed wood can’t be removed before April for one reason or another. However, it will not make beetles that are already in a tree leave. Once they are in, they’re in.”

Learn more about Douglas-fir beetle at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Forest Health webpage.

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Smaller than a fingernail, Douglas-fir beetles like this are attracted to Douglas-fir trees downed by winter storms. From there these pests can attack stands of living Douglas-firs. Landowners have until April to keep the beetles away by removing downed t
Smaller than a fingernail, Douglas-fir beetles like this are attracted to Douglas-fir trees downed by winter storms. From there these pests can attack stands of living Douglas-firs. Landowners have until April to keep the beetles away by removing downed t
Douglas-fir pest outbreak looms in April if landowners don't remove storm-toppled Douglas-firs (Photo) - 03/05/19

SALEM, Ore. — This winter’s heavy snow and wind have knocked down many trees across the state.  This has set up perfect conditions for an outbreak of Douglas-fir beetle unless landowners act quickly to either remove the downed or damaged trees or apply an insect pheromone to drive away the pest.

Forest Entomologist Christine Buhl is with the Oregon Department of Forestry. Buhl said that while the beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) is native to the Northwest, its population can soar when living large-diameter Douglas-fir trees are thrown to the ground.

“Normally this pest is scattered on the landscape wherever Douglas-fir grows,” said Buhl. “However, they tend to concentrate in tree stands where there has been a lot of storm damage.”

“The beetles first attack downed Douglas-firs and then move to nearby standing Douglas-fir trees that are stressed, injured or less vigorous,” said Buhl. “Attacked trees that cannot drown out infesting beetles with pitch die and turn red the same year as the attack or the next spring.”

Tell-tale signs of this beetle’s presence include frass. This is sawdust-like material the beetle ejects from their galleries underneath the tree’s bark, Buhl explained.

Buhl said landowners can prevent Douglas-fir beetle outbreaks by removing large-diameter downed trees before the insects take flight in the spring looking for new homes.

“Before April remove any downed Douglas-firs greater than 10 inches in diameter at a point about chest height,” she advised. “Trees with low vigor should also be removed to reduce stand susceptibility to outbreaks. Large amounts of cull trees created by logging also should not be left on site, particularly in shade.”

Buhl said the beetles will generally not attack trees that have been dead for over a year.

“If removal is delayed or not possible,” said Buhl, “apply the repellant pheromone called MCH to prevent infestation.”

A naturally occurring beetle repellent, MCH (methylcyclohexenone), can be applied to downed logs or standing green trees to prevent Douglas-fir beetle attacks. Buhl said MCH pouches are most often applied in a grid pattern within a stand to effectively deter infestation. Beetles approaching treated areas are fooled by the pheromone into sensing that beetles already occupy the site and will pass it by.

“This technique is useful in parks, camps or habitat conservation areas where salvage is not possible, but there is a desire to preserve the remaining standing trees,” said Buhl. “It’s also helpful in forestlands where downed wood can’t be removed before April for one reason or another. However, it will not make beetles that have already infested a tree leave. Once they are in, they’re in.”   

Learn more about Douglas-fir beetle at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Forest Health webpage.

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Oregon Community Trees gives grants to eight Oregon cities to help them hold tree-related events during Arbor Week - 03/05/19

SALEM, Ore. — The non-profit Oregon Community Trees has awarded grants to eight cities across Oregon to help them hold Arbor Week events in April. Recipients of this year’s grants are Ashland, Bend, Coburg, Corvallis, Cottage Grove, Echo, McMinnville and Monmouth. All eight have earned the Tree City USA title, reflecting their commitment to protecting and promoting urban trees to benefit their residents.

Communities plan to the use the grants in various ways. Ashland, Bend, Coburg, Cottage Grove and McMinnville have scheduled tree plantings. Plantings will involve community volunteers and students from elementary through high school.

Parks Superintendent Mike Oxendine with Ashland Parks and Recreation said, “Plantings during Arbor Week are an opportunity to educate participants on appropriate street tree selections for the local climate, proper planting techniques, and post-planting tree care and maintenance.”

Cottage Grove’s plantings will both celebrate its 25th anniversary as a Tree City USA as well as kick off its citywide street tree inventory.

“We hope to draw attention to the inventory project as an important tool for then reviewing our list of approved street trees,” said Cottage Grove Tree Board Member Eric Mongan. “The goal is to be better prepared for the arrival of tree-killing diseases and pests, such as emerald ash borer.”

Children in the northeast Oregon town of Echo will participate in tree-related activities, such as readings from books about trees and a poster contest. Echo is marking 30 years as a Tree City USA this spring.

Corvallis will use its grant to hold thank-you celebrations for the Parks and Recreation’s corps of Neighborhood Tree Steward volunteers. The Corvallis volunteers just wrapped up a successful season, planting a record-breaking 167 trees in Corvallis parks, open spaces and along city rights of way.

Monmouth’s grant will go to purchase an A-frame to draw attention to planting events residents can participate in, as well as a reusable banner announcing Arbor Week.

Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen of Oregon Community Trees says the non-profit organization promotes healthy urban and community forests. “We assist community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry.”                      

Holen said the organization gave a combined total of close to more than $3,600 in grants this year, the largest amount in its history. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA for at least a year.

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to Ashland to buy trees for park planting during Arbor Week - 03/05/19

ASHLAND, Ore. — The City of Ashland is planning an educational tree planting demonstration Friday, April 5 in the publicly-owned Oak Knoll Golf Course to celebrate Ashland Arbor Week. The effort received a boost this week with a grant from the non-profit Oregon Community Trees to help purchase trees from Plant Oregon nursery in Talent. The nursery is selling trees for the event at a discounted price as an in-kind sponsor.

Ashland Parks Superintendent Mike Oxendine said three city groups are collaborating to hold the demonstration planting – the Ashland Parks and Recreation Commission, the City of Ashland Tree Commission and the City of Ashland Planning Department.

“The park planting will educate participants on appropriate street tree selections for Ashland’s climate, proper planting techniques, and post-planting tree care and maintenance,” said Oxendine.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. According to Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen, Oregon Community Trees assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state. “We provide expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry”  

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status Ashland has held for 34 years.

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to Corvallis Parks and Recreation to help celebrate tree-planting volunteers in April - 03/04/19

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Oregon Community Trees is helping the City of Corvallis cap off its winter planting season with a grant to fund two tree-related celebrations in April that will recognize the Parks and Recreation Department’s volunteer corps of Neighborhood Tree Stewards. Collectively the stewards will have planted a record-breaking 167 trees this season in Corvallis parks, open spaces and streetside rights of way. 

The first celebration is planned for Friday, April 5 during Oregon Arbor Week and the second on Friday, April 26, in honor of national Arbor Day.

In addition to food and beverages for volunteers, Oregon Community Trees’ grant will fund work gloves and safety vests to be used year after year, and signs and tree tags for newly planted trees.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. According to the group’s Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen, “We assist community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry.”       

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status Corvallis has held for 18 years.

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to Bend to buy tree for park planting during Arbor Week - 03/04/19

BEND, Ore. — Local schoolchildren and members of the Orchard District Neighborhood will join forces  to celebrate Arbor Week by planting a fruit tree in Hollinshead Park on April 9. The effort received a boost this week with a grant from the non-profit Oregon Community Trees to help purchase the locally grown fruit tree and supply educational brochures and prizes.  

Wendy Robinson is coordinating the planting. She said students from Juniper Elementary and Pilot Butte Middle School will participate in the plantings alongside community members from Orchard Heights. “We will have tree-related activities for the kids, such as tree identification and tree trivia contests,” said Robinson. “And each student will go home with a seedling tree as a thank you for their participation.”

Members of the wider community are welcome to volunteer at the event. They can go to Bend’s city website to learn exact time and place.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. According to Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen, the organization assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state. “Oregon Community Trees provides expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry,” Holen said.

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status Bend has held for 16 years.

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to McMinnville to help replace two trees on the local high school campus - 03/04/19

MCMINNVILLE, Ore. — Oregon Community Trees has given a grant to McMinnville to help it replace two hazardous trees that were removed from the local high school campus. The two sweetgum trees that were taken down last year were growing near a playground. Their replacements will be planted by students and community members as part of the city’s Arbor Week celebrations the first full week in April.

Jamie Fleckenstein is the planting project coordinator for McMinnville. He said students in the high school’s Natural Resource Management, Fabrication and Welding, and Construction Career Pathways will be engaged in the project.

“The grant from Oregon Community Trees will pay for materials for a plaque to commemorate the planting as an Arbor Week event,” said Fleckenstein. “Students in the Fabrication and Welding course will produce the plaque.”

Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen said Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. “We assist community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry,” Holen said.

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status McMinnville has held for 22 years.

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to Coburg to buy trees for park planting during Arbor Week - 03/04/19

COBURG, Ore. — Local schoolchildren will join Mayor Ray Smith of Coburg, local Parks and Tree Committee members and Coburg Public Works staff in planting trees and shrubs to mark Arbor Week in April. The effort received a boost this week with a grant from the non-profit Oregon Community Trees to help purchase plants and provide food and t-shirts for children who will be participating.

“We are hoping to hold the planting in Coburg’s new Johnny Diamond Park,” said Public Works Director Brian Harmon. “Students from Coburg Community Charter School will again be participating, learning about the importance of trees in urban environments.”

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. According to Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen, the organization assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state. “We provide expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry,” Holen said.

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status Coburg has held for 21 years.

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Oregon Community Trees awards grant to Echo to help it celebrate 30 years as a Tree City USA in April - 03/04/19

ECHO, Ore. — Oregon Community Trees is helping Echo celebrate its 30th anniversary as a Tree City USA with a grant funding the town’s annual Tree Fair/Arbor Day event in April.

Diane Berry is the event coordinator. Barry said the planned date for the event is Thursday, April 18.

 “The festivities will include activity stations for elementary school children to learn about trees and the community’s tree programs,” she said. “For example, the librarian will read selections from books about trees.”

The grant from Oregon Community Trees will pay for shirts or vests for event volunteers well as door prizes and poster contest prizes, such as trees and tree-related books.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. According to the group’s Grants Committee Chair Morgan Holen, “We assist community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry.”

This year eight cities in Oregon are receiving a combined total of more than $3,600 in grants from Oregon Community Trees. One criteria for receiving an Arbor Week grant is being a Tree City USA, a status Echo has held for three decades.

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Artist Martin Conley's wood sculptures will be on display at the Tillamook Forest Center March 1-May 26.
Artist Martin Conley's wood sculptures will be on display at the Tillamook Forest Center March 1-May 26.
Tillamook Forest Center opens Friday with bee talk and art (Photo) - 02/27/19

Tillamook, Ore. -- The Tillamook Forest Center opens for the 2019 season on Friday, March 1, kicking off with a presentation series for minds that are curious about Oregon’s forests and a sculpture exhibit showcasing dead trees turned into art.

Fresh Brewed Forestry features scientists from the Oregon Department of Forestry offering a behind-the-scenes peek at how the agency manages forests for Oregonians. The series starts at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 9, tackling the vital role bees play in Oregon’s forests, where they are, and how we can protect them. Forest entomologist Christine Buhl will discuss how Oregon is enhancing pollinator health and habitat, and what forestland owners can do on their properties to be part of the effort. Future topics include the relationship between biomass and carbon reduction and how soil recovers after a wildfire. Coffee and tea will be provided.

Through May 26, visitors can see the art of Martin Conley, who sees value in dead trees often discarded by others. Some of the sculptures can be up to 8 feet tall. He carves holes and grooves in the wood, exposing cavities, colors and textures once hidden behind a weathered exterior.

For a full calendar of events and to learn how you can visit or volunteer at the Center, visit tillamookforestcenter.com.

About the Tillamook Forest Center: Nestled in the heart of the Tillamook State Forest, the Tillamook Forest Center is the region’s largest forest-based interpretative and educational center, located 50 miles west of Portland and 22 miles east of Tillamook on Oregon Highway 6.  It is a special place to develop a deeper connection with Oregon’s forests through experience and exploration. Spring hours for the Center are Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A $5 donation is suggested.

Board of Forestry meets March 6, agenda includes recognizing 2018 Operators of the Year - 02/26/19

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Board of Forestry will honor the 2018 Operators of the Year at its March 6 meeting in Salem. The Operator Recognition Program recognizes forest operators who have excelled in effort, innovation, cooperation, consistency, and prevention to achieve or surpass forest resource protection standards. The public meeting is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. and run through approximately 4 p.m., followed by a one-hour executive session.

In addition to operator recognition, researchers from Oregon State University will provide an overview of a marbled murrelet habitat study. Staff will present updates on State Forests management planning. The Committee for Family Forestlands, which advises the Board about issues impacting nonindustrial private forest landowners, will give an update on proposed legislation relating to family dwelling allowances. The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee, which advises the Board on State Forests Policy, will also provide comments to the Board.

The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem. The meeting is open to the public. Public comment will be accepted on agenda topics as well as during the start of the meeting for topics not on the agenda. A sign-up sheet will be available for public comment on a first-come, first-served basis. Written comments may be submitted to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">Boardofforestry@oregon.gov in advance of the meeting.

A livestream option will be available for those who wish to view the meeting remotely. For more details, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Meeting materials are available at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

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The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.