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Historic State Forester's Building in Salem celebrates 80th anniversary with Dec. 1 open house - 11/16/18

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry welcomes visitors to its Salem campus on Saturday, Dec. 1 to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the historic State Forester’s Office. The public can tour this Works Progress Administration (WPA)-built facility from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Current and retired ODF staff will be available to share the building’s history. The State Forester’s Office, located at 2600 State Street in Salem, opened for business on Dec. 1, 1938 and remains in use today.

The building was designed by architects from the US Forest Service in the National Park Style. In addition to administrative offices, it houses the State Forester and includes the original meeting room for the Board of Forestry. Recognizing the long-standing connection between Oregonians and their forests, 18 different Oregon woods were used in its construction, representing every forested region of the state. A plaque in each room names the types of wood as well as the donating company. The building also features hand-wrought iron door plates and decorative hand-carved wooden accents.

The Forest History Center, also located on ODF’s Salem campus, will be open for public viewing as well. The Center, which is housed in a building constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1936, serves as a place to preserve and interpret the history of forestry in Oregon. It is staffed and operated by volunteers and funded through donations and grants.

Volunteers from the Forest History Center will prepare photo displays to interpret construction of the State Forester’s Office, along with other milestones in the building’s history. Current and retired ODF staff will provide tours, share the building’s lore, and talk about their own experience working for the Agency. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

Large wood in streams, like pictured here in Gales Creek, helps create pools and side channels where fish can spawn, while their offspring can find shelter from predators and refuge from strong creek flows in the winter.
Large wood in streams, like pictured here in Gales Creek, helps create pools and side channels where fish can spawn, while their offspring can find shelter from predators and refuge from strong creek flows in the winter.
Gales Creek stream designed to improve fish habitat (Photo) - 11/14/18

GALES CREEK, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife have teamed up to enhance habitat in upper Gales Creek for threatened steelhead and other aquatic life.

Winding through the Tillamook State Forest and flowing into the Tualatin River, Gales Creek serves as critical habitat for upper Willamette steelhead, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. ODF and ODFW have led a years-long cooperative project to improve habitat in the Gales Creek basin. The latest step was a project in fall of 2018 enhancing a mile-long stretch of Gales Creek, with plans in place to complete a second mile in the summer of 2019. This work was funded in part by the Oregon Wildlife Foundation as well as in-kind services from both agencies. 

“When I do projects like this, it’s more than my professional duty,” said Mark Meleason, aquatic and riparian specialist for ODF’s State Forests Division. “Our model for state forests is we want to do the right thing, and this is doing the right thing for the environment. We’re providing good habitat, and we’re enhancing it.”

The agencies worked with a contractor to strategically cut and place 100 trees from the riparian forest into the stream to increase the complexity of the aquatic habitat. Logs create pools and side channels where fish can spawn, while their offspring can find shelter from predators and refuge from strong creek flows in the winter. The trees were selected from a mixed conifer / hardwood forest where hardwoods, mainly alder, are nearing the end of their lifespan. These trees used for the enhancement will be replaced ten-fold in the spring, when ODF will plant approximately 1,000 seedlings along the creek bank.

“Logjams are the most important part of stream habitat for fish,” said Dave Stewart, a stream restoration biologist for ODFW. “When you have wood in the stream, it creates habitat for juvenile fish, spawning and amphibians. All the fish and wildlife species need this wood – we’ve documented that with many studies.”

This portion of Gales Creek is in the Tillamook State Forest and was part of the Tillamook Burn, a series of catastrophic forest fires from the 1930s-50s that, decades later, still leave a mark on the land – in this case, less wood available for stream enhancement. Projects like this mimic the natural pattern of trees falling into streams as they age or are knocked down by storms.

This cooperative effort is just one of many cooperative projects conducted by ODF and ODFW under the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds to restore healthy salmon populations and their watersheds. 

Be part of the state forests conversation: Advisory committee seeks members - 11/13/18

Salem, Ore. -- A committee advising Oregon Department of Forestry staff on forest operations, projects and activities is currently seeking applications to fill three vacancies.

Formed in 2001, the State Forests Advisory Committee provides input on the implementation of forest management plans in northwest and southwest Oregon. The committee represents a diverse range of forestry interests and serves as a forum to discuss agency opportunities for achieving forest management goals in these areas.

The committee specifically covers issues related to ODF district Annual Operations Plans, best practices for balancing a range of forest benefits, strategies for improving public outreach and participation, and other technical forest management topics.

The three new members will serve three-year terms beginning in March 2019. There is one vacancy apiece for members from the timber industry, tribal community and a non-affiliated position.

“This is an opportunity for Oregonians to take a seat at the table of today’s forestry conversation and provide insight and perspectives on how we are implementing the forest management plans. We look forward to hosting a diverse and experienced committee in the coming months,” said Andy White, Northwest Oregon Area Director for the Oregon Department of Forestry.

SFAC members attend three meetings per year and a summer field tour, and agendas are usually scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.   

To apply, complete a questionnaire (http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Working/Documents/SFACApplicationQuestionnaire2018.pdf) by December 14, 2018 and submit to April Davis at the Oregon Department of Forestry by email to il.r.davis@oregon.gov" target="_blank">april.r.davis@oregon.govor mail to 801 Gales Creek Road, Forest Grove, OR 97116.

For specific questions about the committee, please contact Andy White at 503-359-7496 or ew.t.white@oregon.gov" target="_blank">andrew.t.white@oregon.gov. Additional SFAC background information can be found here (http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SFAC.aspx).

Oregon Department of Forestry Sends Equipment and Personnel to Assist with California Wildfires - 11/12/18

Salem, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has deployed two strike teams with equipment and personnel to assist in suppression efforts for the devastating wildfires in California. This deployment was coordinated with the Oregon Office of Emergency Management through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC).

Using the EMAC system, California fire officials originally requested additional resources to support suppression efforts in the southern portion of the state. The two ODF strike teams, consisting of five Type 6 engines each, two strike team leaders and an agency representative, departed early Sunday morning. In addition to ODF districts in eastern and southern Oregon, resources include engines and personnel from the Douglas Forest Protection Association.

While en route, the ODF teams received new orders to divert to the Camp Fire near Chico, CA due to the evolving and emergent situation. Both strike teams arrived at the Camp Incident Command Post Sunday evening and will be joining suppression efforts on the front line Monday morning. 

“Oregon and California have a long-standing relationship of mutual aid wherever suppression resources are needed,” said Oregon’s State Forester, Peter Daugherty. “California has come to our aid during our challenging fire seasons and Oregon is now able to help California during this tragic time of need.”

At the time of arrival, the Camp Fire was reported at 111,000 acres and 25 percent containment, with approximately 6,453 residences destroyed and an additional 15,000 structures threatened. An estimated 31 people have lost their lives and an additional 200 are listed as missing.

The ODF teams will join their Oregon State Fire Marshal counterparts, adding to the growing number of out of state resources joining suppression efforts during these devastating wildfires impacting much of the state. The team anticipates a full 14-day deployment.

###

After an intense wildfire, soils may be less able to absorb runoff, raising the risk of flooding and debris flows. A new playbook will help Oregon communities prepare for such post-wildfire hazards.
After an intense wildfire, soils may be less able to absorb runoff, raising the risk of flooding and debris flows. A new playbook will help Oregon communities prepare for such post-wildfire hazards.
New post-wildfire resource guide now available to help communities cope with flood and debris flow danger (Photo) - 11/08/18

SALEM, Ore. – Autumn rains may have ended Oregon’s wildfire season but not the risk of floods and debris flows following in their wake. That is why a working group of state and federal agencies have  released a new playbook. The playbook will aid local officials in finding resources to help prevent or cope with potentially catastrophic wildfire after-effects.

Wildfires burned more than 856,000 acres this year across all of Oregon, well above the 10-year average of approximately 500,000 acres, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Chief of Fire Protection Doug Grafe.

“High intensity wildfires can destroy protective vegetation and alter soil so it is less able to absorb rainfall and snowmelt,” said Grafe. “After such fires, there can be an increased risk of flooding or debris flows.”

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, landslides (also known as debris flows) cause about $3.5 billion (in 2001 dollars) in damage in the U.S. each year, and claim between 25 to 50 lives. A prime example is the debris flow that hit Montecito in Southern California in January of this year. Just weeks after the Thomas Fire burned the hills above the town of about 9,000, a debris flow swept through, killing more than 20 people.

Ryan Cahill, hydraulic engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said his agency worked with several partners to compile and complete the guide, including:

  • Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Oregon Department of Forestry
  • Oregon Emergency Management
  • Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development
  • U.S. Forest Service
  • U.S. Geological Survey

“Federal and state partners already work together to suppress wildfires, so it was natural for us to come together to prepare a guide for community leaders on what to do after wildfires,” said Cahill. “The playbook we produced explains what to do to reduce the risk from floods and debris flows, identifies the resources available to help do that, and where to find those resources,” said Cahill.

Among steps Cahill said at-risk communities can take, one is designating in advance where evacuation centers will be, including animal-friendly locations where pets and livestock can receive care. Alert systems, such as reverse 9-1-1 calls, should also be organized and periodically tested.

All government entities and critical emergency organizations, such as hospitals, utilities, food banks and schools, should know their roles in a community flood or debris flow emergency. Then be equipped and prepared to carry out those plans.

Although the playbook is intended for elected local officials and emergency managers, individuals can help protect themselves as well.

“Property owners and those living and working near rivers where catastrophic fires have occurred should be aware of their level of risk and take appropriate preparedness actions,” said Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps. “This includes having ‘two-weeks ready’ preparedness supplies handy, signing up for emergency notification systems where you live, and reviewing insurance coverage to make sure your home is protected for hazards like flooding and landslides.”   

The playbook can be accessed at:

https://silverjackets.nfrmp.us/Portals/0/doc/Oregon/PostFireFloodPlaybook_2018-09-30.pdf?ver=2018-10-04-203119-453

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Oregon Department of Forestry Sends Third Incident Management Team To Support Hurricane Michael Response Efforts - 11/08/18

Salem, OR – Due to the extensive destruction caused by Hurricane Michael, the Florida Division of Emergency Management has requested additional Incident Management Teams. The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is filling this request, working with Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM), and sending a third team to assist with relief and recovery efforts.  

As with recent deployments, this request was coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC). The EMAC provides mutual assistance among states and territories during any governor-declared state of emergency through a responsive system. This structure allows states to send personnel, equipment, and supplies to assist with response and relief efforts in other states.

This ODF Team, led by Incident Commander Link Smith, arrived in Tallahassee, Fla. late Tuesday, Nov. 6, where they received an in-briefing from the Florida National Guard at the Tallahassee Base Camp. Their current mission is to assist with oversight of the Base Camp located in Marianna, Fla., in the heart of the destruction zone. Their assignment includes ensuring the safety and welfare of Base Camp and coordination of communication efforts. All ODF Team members are in good health and spirits, and look forward to helping improve the situation.

ODF Agency Representative Dennis Lee mobilized with the team to oversee coordination of both of the ODF teams currently deployed in Florida. “The magnitude of destruction here is difficult to convey for those back at home,” Lee said. “Along with the devastation of so many homes and buildings, the sheer volume of what I would refer to as near-deforestation is somewhat unreal. Despite all of this, life goes on for everyone here and the resiliency of the local residents is truly inspiring. We are honored to be here to do our part in helping our Florida friends put the pieces back together.”

While ODF utilizes the EMAC most often during fire season, agency Incident Management Teams maintain All-Hazard qualifications to ensure capacity for potential disaster relief needs. ODF’s complete and coordinated fire suppression system relies on strong partnerships with other agencies, states and even countries, offering reciprocal assistance in times of need.

###

CORRECTED: Christmas tree heads to state Capitol from Clatsop State Forest on Nov. 15 - 11/08/18

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon State Capitol’s Christmas tree will be arriving from the Clatsop State Forest on Thursday, Nov. 15, donated by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

The 30-foot Noble fir tree will be cut and delivered by ODF staff. The tree arrives Thursday morning, with unloading and setup scheduled to start at 8:30 a.m. and continue until approximately 10 a.m.

“The Oregon Department of Forestry is very excited to contribute to Holidays at the Capitol,” South Fork Forest Camp Manager Dave Luttrell said. “Our employees take a lot of pride in being part of this Oregon tradition.”

The tree lighting event is set for Tuesday, Nov. 27, with a choral performance by South Salem High School at 5 p.m., and the lighting program beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Holidays at the Capitol is made possible through generous donations by organizations, businesses and individuals throughout the state and the Capitol’s volunteers. More than 10,000 people visit the Capitol every year during the holiday season. To learn more, visit www.oregoncapitol.com.

Committee for Family Forestlands meets Nov. 15 in Salem - 11/05/18

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Thursday, Nov. 15 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Salem. The meeting will be at the Best Western Mill Creek Inn, 3125 Ryan Drive SE.  The committee will receive updates about:

  • recent work of ODF’s Private Forests Division
  • an additional dwelling allowance
  • availability of tree seedlings
  • incentives for forest restoration
  • sudden oak death

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

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The Gaebels of Washington have been honored by the Oregon Tree Farm System for outstanding management of their forest land
The Gaebels of Washington have been honored by the Oregon Tree Farm System for outstanding management of their forest land
Oregon Tree Farm System recognizes Washington County couple at an event honoring outstanding tree farmers (Photo) - 11/01/18

SILVERTON, Ore. – A Washington County couple – Rich and Connie Gaebel – were among five tree farms recognized by the Oregon Tree Farm System at an awards luncheon Saturday. The annual event, which honors Oregon’s outstanding tree farmers, was held at the Oregon Garden in Silverton.

Winner of the 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year was the Oakes family of Benton County. The Oakes own several parcels of forest land, approximately 800 acres, west of Monroe and near Alsea in Benton County, and in northern Lane County. The homestead parcel, west of Monroe, was purchased in 1883 by Don Oakes’ great-grandfather. Their forests are currently being cared for by four generations.

Goals for their forests include producing income from timber harvest, providing wildlife habitat, maintaining a family gathering spot, and sharing what they have learned with other woodland owners, local organizations and the general public.

Don and Donna Oakes passed the ownership on to their six children in 1999, forming the Oakes Investment LLC. Their daughter, Marsha Carr, who passed away this summer, took on the leadership role after her retirement. 

“Marsha worked with Dad to learn about forestry and eventually took the Master Woodland Manager course from the OSU Extension Service,” said brother Darrell Oakes.  “She did plot studies, marked trees for thinning and recovery after storm damage, and recently laid out a major road project.”

Marsha was an active member of the Benton County Small Woodlands Association, and helped her father manage the LLC properties.

Their forests are certified by the American Tree Farm System meeting their standards of sustainability. Their management goals and action plan are defined in their management plan, which was first hand written by Don years ago. Marsha took on the current version this past year.

Darrell stated, “The plan is an educational tool for the next generation. They can look at what we were thinking to guide them in managing the property”.

Also recognized for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management by the Oregon Tree Farm System were four other family forest landowners:

  • Debi Poppe and Tim Dahl (Clackamas County)
  • Hull Timber Ranch LLC (Lane County)
  • The Weld Family Tree Farm (Linn County)
  • Tom and Cindy Beechinor and family (Umatilla County)

For 52 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. 

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

                                                                                          # # #

The Beechinor family of Umatilla County was honored Oct. 27 by the Oregon Tree Farm System.
The Beechinor family of Umatilla County was honored Oct. 27 by the Oregon Tree Farm System.
Oregon Tree Farm System recognizes Umatilla County family at event honoring Oregon's outstanding tree farmers (Photo) - 11/01/18

SILVERTON, Ore. – A family from Umatilla County – Tom and Cindy Beechinor and Family – were among five tree farms recognized by the Oregon Tree Farm System at an awards luncheon Saturday. The annual event, which honors Oregon’s outstanding tree farmers, was held at the Oregon Garden in Silverton.

The Beechinors own several forested properties in the Milton-Freewater area of northeast Oregon. Tom’s great-great-grandfather came to the Walla Walla River Valley in 1863. Their main objective in managing their property is to maintain and enhance a vigorous forest to pass on to their children. They have planted over 15,000 tree seedlings over the years, and thinned trees to improve tree health and reduce the risk of fire.

Winner of the 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year was the Oakes family of Benton County. The Oakes own several parcels of forest land, approximately 800 acres, west of Monroe and near Alsea in Benton County, and in northern Lane County. The homestead parcel, west of Monroe, was purchased in 1883 by Don Oakes’ great-grandfather. Their forests are currently being cared for by four generations.

Goals for their forests include producing income from timber harvest, providing wildlife habitat, maintaining a family gathering spot, and sharing what they have learned with other woodland owners, local organizations and the general public.

Don and Donna Oakes passed the ownership on to their six children in 1999, forming the Oakes Investment LLC. Their daughter, Marsha Carr, who passed away this summer, took on the leadership role after her retirement. 

“Marsha worked with Dad to learn about forestry and eventually took the Master Woodland Manager course from the OSU Extension Service,” said brother Darrell Oakes.  “She did plot studies, marked trees for thinning and recovery after storm damage, and recently laid out a major road project.”

Marsha was an active member of the Benton County Small Woodlands Association, and helped her father manage the LLC properties.

Their forests are certified by the American Tree Farm System meeting their standards of sustainability. Their management goals and action plan are defined in their management plan, which was first hand written by Don years ago. Marsha took on the current version this past year.

Darrell stated, “The plan is an educational tool for the next generation. They can look at what we were thinking to guide them in managing the property”.

Also recognized for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management by the Oregon Tree Farm System were four other family forest landowners:

  • Debi Poppe and Tim Dahl (Clackamas County)
  • Hull Timber Ranch LLC (Lane County)
  • The Weld Family Tree Farm (Linn County)
  • Rich and Connie Gaebel (Washington County)

For 52 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. 

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

                                                                                           # # #

Oregon Tree Farm System recognizes a Linn County tree farm at event honoring Oregon's outstanding tree farmers - 11/01/18

SILVERTON, Ore. – The Weld Family Tree Farm of Linn County was among five forest landowners recognized by the Oregon Tree Farm System at an awards luncheon Saturday.  The annual event, which honors Oregon’s outstanding tree farmers, was held in the Oregon Garden in Silverton.

Sherman and Leslie Weld own a 140-acre forest near Sweet Home. Sherman’s dad purchased the property in 1968 to raise cattle. It was passed down to Sherman and his three brothers. Over time, Sherman bought his brothers’ shares.

The Welds determined that growing trees was a better and higher use of the land. With help from local tree farmers, they converted the land to a healthy, sustainable forest with timber and wildlife habitat as key objectives.

Winner of the 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year was the Oakes family of Benton County. The Oakes own several parcels of forest land, approximately 800 acres, west of Monroe and near Alsea in Benton County, and in northern Lane County. The homestead parcel, west of Monroe, was purchased in 1883 by Don Oakes’ great-grandfather. Their forests are currently being cared for by four generations.

Goals for their forests include producing income from timber harvest, providing wildlife habitat, maintaining a family gathering spot, and sharing what they have learned with other woodland owners, local organizations and the general public.

Don and Donna Oakes passed the ownership on to their six children in 1999, forming the Oakes Investment LLC. Their daughter, Marsha Carr, who passed away this summer, took on the leadership role after her retirement. 

“Marsha worked with Dad to learn about forestry and eventually took the Master Woodland Manager course from the OSU Extension Service,” said brother Darrell Oakes.  “She did plot studies, marked trees for thinning and recovery after storm damage, and recently laid out a major road project.”

Marsha was an active member of the Benton County Small Woodlands Association, and helped her father manage the LLC properties.

Their forests are certified by the American Tree Farm System meeting their standards of sustainability. Their management goals and action plan are defined in their management plan, which was first hand written by Don years ago. Marsha took on the current version this past year.

Darrell stated, “The plan is an educational tool for the next generation. They can look at what we were thinking to guide them in managing the property”.

Also recognized for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management by the Oregon Tree Farm System were four other family forest landowners:

  • Debi Poppe and Tim Dahl (Clackamas County)
  • Hull Timber Ranch LLC (Lane County)
  • Tom and Cindy Beechinor and family (Umatilla County)
  • Rich and Connie Gaebel (Washington County)

For 52 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. 

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

                                                                                          # # #

Oregon's new Tree Farmer of the Year is the Oakes family, which owns forestland in Lane and Benton counties.
Oregon's new Tree Farmer of the Year is the Oakes family, which owns forestland in Lane and Benton counties.
Oregon Tree Farm System honors Lane County tree farmers for their outstanding forestry management (Photo) - 11/01/18

EUGENE, Ore. – Lane County tree farmer Linda Hull was among five forest landowners recognized by the Oregon Tree Farm System at an awards luncheon Saturday. The annual event, which honors Oregon’s outstanding tree farmers, was held at the Oregon Garden in Silverton.   

Linda and her late husband, Paul, purchased their 120-acre property near Cottage Grove in 1976. The property has been passed down through the Hull family since John and Amanda Hull got it as a Donation Land Claim in 1891. Linda and her children manage the forest for timber and wildlife habitat.

Oregon’s 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year, who were recognized at the same event as Hull, also have ties to Lane County. The Oakes family owns several parcels of forest land, approximately 800 acres, in northern Lane County, and west of Monroe and near Alsea in Benton County. The homestead parcel, west of Monroe, was purchased in 1883 by Don Oakes’ great-grandfather. Their forests are currently being cared for by four generations.

Goals for their forests include producing income from timber harvest, providing wildlife habitat, maintaining a family gathering spot, and sharing what they have learned with other woodland owners, local organizations and the general public.

Don and Donna Oakes passed the ownership on to their six children in 1999, forming the Oakes Investment LLC. Their daughter, Marsha Carr, who passed away this summer, took on the leadership role after her retirement.  

“Marsha worked with Dad to learn about forestry and eventually took the Master Woodland Manager course from the OSU Extension Service,” said brother Darrell Oakes.  “She did plot studies, marked trees for thinning and recovery after storm damage, and recently laid out a major road project.”

Marsha was an active member of the Benton County Small Woodlands Association, and helped her father manage the LLC properties.

Their forests are certified by the American Tree Farm System meeting their standards of sustainability. Their management goals and action plan are defined in their management plan, which was first hand written by Don years ago. Marsha took on the current version this past year.

Darrell stated, “The plan is an educational tool for the next generation. They can look at what we were thinking to guide them in managing the property”.

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized five other family forest landowners for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management. The other honorees were:

  • Debi Poppe and Tim Dahl (Clackamas County)
  • The Weld Family Tree Farm (Linn County)
  • Tom and Cindy Beechinor and Family (Umatilla County)
  • Rich and Connie Gaebel  (Washington County)

For 52 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. 

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance. 

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

                                                                                           # # #

Oregon Tree Farm System recognizes tree farmers from Clackamas County at event honoring Oregon's outstanding tree farmers - 11/01/18

SILVERTON, Ore. – Clackamas County tree farmers Debi Poppe and Tim Dahl

were among five forest landowners recognized by the Oregon Tree Farm System at an awards luncheon Saturday. The annual event, which honors Oregon’s outstanding tree farmers, was held at the Oregon Garden in Silverton.

Poppe and Dahl purchased 15-acres of neglected forestland near Redland in 1986. Over the years they cleared brush, converted rot-diseased areas, planted trees and thinned to create what is today a healthy, sustainably managed forest.

Winner of the 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year was the Oakes family of Benton County. The Oakes own several parcels of forest land, approximately 800 acres, west of Monroe and near Alsea in Benton County, and in northern Lane County. The homestead parcel, west of Monroe, was purchased in 1883 by Don Oakes’ great-grandfather. Their forests are currently being cared for by four generations.

Goals for their forests include producing income from timber harvest, providing wildlife habitat, maintaining a family gathering spot, and sharing what they have learned with other woodland owners, local organizations and the general public.

Don and Donna Oakes passed the ownership on to their six children in 1999, forming the Oakes Investment LLC. Their daughter, Marsha Carr, who passed away this summer, took on the leadership role after her retirement. 

“Marsha worked with Dad to learn about forestry and eventually took the Master Woodland Manager course from the OSU Extension Service,” said brother Darrell Oakes.  “She did plot studies, marked trees for thinning and recovery after storm damage, and recently laid out a major road project.”

Marsha was an active member of the Benton County Small Woodlands Association, and helped her father manage the LLC properties.

Their forests are certified by the American Tree Farm System meeting their standards of sustainability. Their management goals and action plan are defined in their management plan, which was first hand written by Don years ago. Marsha took on the current version this past year.

Darrell stated, “The plan is an educational tool for the next generation. They can look at what we were thinking to guide them in managing the property”.

Also recognized for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management by the Oregon Tree Farm System were four other family forest landowners:

  • Hull Timber Ranch LLC (Lane County)
  • The Weld Family Tree Farm (Linn County)
  • Tom and Cindy Beechinor and family (Umatilla County)
  • Rich and Connie Gaebel (Washington County)

For 52 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. 

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

                                                                                          # # #

The Oakes family of Benton County has been named Oregon Tree Farmer of the Year
The Oakes family of Benton County has been named Oregon Tree Farmer of the Year
Oregon Tree Farm System announces family with deep Benton County ties as Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year (Photo) - 11/01/18

MONROE, Ore. – The Oregon Tree Farm System has announced a family with deep ties to Benton County as Oregon’s 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. The Oakes family’s efforts were honored Saturday during an awards luncheon at the Oregon Garden in Silverton.

The Oakes own several parcels of forest land, approximately 800 acres, west of Monroe and near Alsea in Benton County, as well as in northern Lane County. The homestead parcel, west of Monroe, was purchased in 1883 by Don Oakes’ great-grandfather. Their forests are currently being cared for by four generations.

Goals for their forests include producing income from timber harvest, providing wildlife habitat, maintaining a family gathering spot, and sharing what they have learned with other woodland owners, local organizations and the general public.

Don and Donna Oakes passed the ownership on to their six children in 1999, forming the Oakes Investment LLC. Their daughter, Marsha Carr, who passed away this summer, took on the leadership role after her retirement. 

“Marsha worked with Dad to learn about forestry and eventually took the Master Woodland Manager course from the OSU Extension Service,” said brother Darrell Oakes.  “She did plot studies, marked trees for thinning and recovery after storm damage, and recently laid out a major road project.”

Marsha was an active member of the Benton County Small Woodlands Association, and helped her father manage the LLC properties.

Their forests are certified by the American Tree Farm System meeting their standards of sustainability. Their management goals and action plan are defined in their management plan, which was first hand written by Don years ago. Marsha took on the current version this past year.

Darrell stated, “The plan is an educational tool for the next generation. They can look at what we were thinking to guide them in managing the property”.

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized five other family forest landowners for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management. The other honorees were:

  • Debi Poppe and Tim Dahl (Clackamas County)
  • Hull Timber Ranch LLC (Lane County)
  • The Weld Family Tree Farm (Linn County)
  • Tom and Cindy Beechinor and family (Umatilla County)
  • Rich and Connie Gaebel  (Washington County)

For 52 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. 

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

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Oakes_family_-_Oregon_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year.jpg
Oakes_family_-_Oregon_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year.jpg
Oregon Tree Farm System announces Oregon's Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year for 2018 (Photo) - 11/01/18

SILVERTON, Ore. – The Oregon Tree Farm System has announced the Oakes family as Oregon’s 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. Their efforts were honored Saturday during an awards luncheon at The Oregon Garden in Silverton.

The Oakes own several parcels of forest land, approximately 800 acres, west of Monroe and near Alsea in Benton County, and in northern Lane County. The homestead parcel, west of Monroe, was purchased in 1883 by Don Oakes’ great-grandfather. Their forests are currently being cared for by four generations.

Goals for their forests include producing income from timber harvest, providing wildlife habitat, maintaining a family gathering spot, and sharing what they have learned with other woodland owners, local organizations and the general public.

Don and Donna Oakes passed the ownership on to their six children in 1999, forming the Oakes Investment LLC. Their daughter, Marsha Carr, who passed away this summer, took on the leadership role after her retirement. 

“Marsha worked with Dad to learn about forestry and eventually took the Master Woodland Manager course from the OSU Extension Service,” said brother Darrell Oakes.  “She did plot studies, marked trees for thinning and recovery after storm damage, and recently laid out a major road project.”

Marsha was an active member of the Benton County Small Woodlands Association, and helped her father manage the LLC properties.

Their forests are certified by the American Tree Farm System meeting their standards of sustainability. Their management goals and action plan are defined in their management plan, which was first hand written by Don years ago. Marsha took on the current version this past year.

Darrell stated, “The plan is an educational tool for the next generation. They can look at what we were thinking to guide them in managing the property”.

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized five other family forest landowners for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management. The other honorees were:

  • Debi Poppe and Tim Dahl (Clackamas County)
  • Hull Timber Ranch LLC (Lane County)
  • The Weld Family Tree Farm (Linn County)
  • Tom and Cindy Beechinor and family (Umatilla County)
  • Rich and Connie Gaebel  (Washington County)

For 52 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. 

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

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2018 Fire Season Officially Over, Fire Prevention Continues - 10/30/18

SALEM — The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), which protects roughly 16 million acres of private, state and federal lands, officially declared the end of fire season statewide yesterday, Oct. 29.

For ODF, fire season is declared and terminated at the district level, based on local fire danger conditions. Of the Department’s 12 districts across the state, Central Oregon and Southwest Oregon Districts saw drier, warmer conditions early on, officially kicking off the season June 1. Over the course of the 2018 fire season, ODF and its forest protective association partners suppressed a total of 1,059 fires. An estimated 75,531 acres burned on ODF-protected land this year, more than doubling the 10-year average.

Oregon’s complete and coordinated wildfire protection system — consisting of ODF, landowner partners, agency cooperators, and the fire contracting community — was successful under extremely challenging conditions this year. In spite of statewide drought conditions, ODF and partners again succeeded in keeping 95% of all wildfires to less than 10 acres with aggressive and successful initial attacks.

From mid-June through much of September, a combination of historically high temperatures and near-record low precipitation levels and fuel moistures resulted in a significant fire activity increase across the state, in spite of an above-average snowpack and precipitation the previous winter. Dry lightning storms were a contributing factor.

More than 2,800 lightning strikes in mid-July ignited hundreds of starts, at least seven of which became large fires in southwest Oregon. Another lightning event in August with 2,335 strikes ignited hundreds of starts in central and eastern Oregon. Of these hundreds of starts, the majority were caught and contained in initial attack, with only eight large fires established in central Oregon.

“With numerous large fires and limited resources across the nation, the 2018 fire season brought real challenges,” said ODF Interim Deputy Chief for Fire Operations, Russ Lane. “For ODF, we also saw a number of successes. Thanks to aggressive and safe firefighting, we were able to keep several potentially large fires small in scale while keeping firefighter injuries to a minimum. We are grateful for our partnerships and their invaluable roles within Oregon’s complete and coordinated fire protection system, including forest landowners, rural fire districts, and federal and state partners.”

Nationally, as well as in Oregon and Washington, we were at Preparedness Level 5 (the highest level) for 32 days, 8 days shorter than the record-holding 2017 fire season, Increased wildland fire activity on the national level required major commitment of limited resources, adding complexity to an already dynamic fire season.

With the transition out of fire season, ODF districts across the state are shifting their attention to wildfire prevention efforts. Working with partners, landowners and members of the public, the shared objective is to minimize potential fuels for the coming fire season, mitigating risk while remaining vigilant with any activity associated with fire.

“Fire prevention remains our top priority,” Lane said. “Human-caused fires — especially debris burning and illegal, abandoned campfires — continue to raise concern, and we are focusing outreach and messaging efforts there alongside our partner Keep Oregon Green. Combined with fuel reduction and mitigation, we are constantly looking for new ways to raise awareness and support Oregonians in our shared objective to reduce wildfire and keep Oregon green.”

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Oregon Department of Forestry Sends Incident Management Team To Support Hurricane Michael Response Efforts - 10/29/18

Salem, OR – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), working with Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM), is filling a request from the Florida Division of Emergency Management for an All-Hazards Incident Management Team (IMT) to support the response to Hurricane Michael. 

The request is coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) agreement. The EMAC offers assistance among states and territories during any governor-declared state of emergency through a responsive system, providing a mutual aid structure. This allows states to send personnel, equipment, and supplies to assist with response and relief efforts in other states.

While ODF utilizes the EMAC most often during fire season, agency Incident Management Teams maintain All-Hazard qualifications to ensure capacity for potential disaster relief needs. ODF’s complete and coordinated fire suppression system relies on strong partnerships with other agencies, states and even countries, offering reciprocal assistance in times of need.

With an estimated 23,000 residents still without power in wake of this catastrophic storm, the ODF IMT, led by Incident Commander Chris Cline, is eager to bring some added capacity to their counterparts in Florida.

“Our strong partnerships with fellow agencies and states have proven invaluable to our success in wildfire suppression,” Cline said. “Just a few months ago we had an IMT from Florida standing side-by-side with our folks battling wildfire here in Oregon. Knowing the bases are covered on the home front with fire season winding down, our team is ready and willing to get to work. We’re truly grateful for the opportunity to return the favor.”

Arriving in Tallahassee, Fla. Monday afternoon, the team will be working out of a base camp in Panama City, in the epicenter of the devastation zone. The ODF IMT anticipates a full deployment of 14 days.  
 

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Board of Forestry meets Nov. 7 and 8, agenda includes State Forests management planning - 10/26/18

Date:  Oct. 26, 2018

Contact:  Hilary Olivos-Rood, Board of Forestry Administrator, 503-945-7210

Salem, Ore. – The Oregon Board of Forestry will convene for a two-day meeting in Salem Nov. 7-8. On Nov. 7, the Board will review and continue to provide direction on a new management plan for northwest Oregon’s State Forests. On Nov. 8, discussion will turn to next steps for a Western Oregon Habitat Conservation Plan on State Forests. Both days will include testimony from the Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee, which advises the Board on State Forests Policy.

The public meeting on Nov. 7 is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. and run through approximately 4:15 p.m., followed by a one-hour Executive Session. In addition to the State Forests management plan discussion, staff and invited speakers will provide updates from the 2018 fire season, results from public polling about forest issues, an overview of ecosystem services valuation methods, and updates from the J.E. Schroeder Seed Orchard and Oregon Seed Bank.

On Nov. 8, the meeting will start at 8 a.m. and is scheduled to end by 12:30 p.m. Following discussion of the Western Oregon Habitat Conservation Plan, the Board will review a technical report related to the Forest Practices Act rule analysis for Marbled Murrelets.

The meetings will be held in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry Headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem. Public comment will be accepted on agenda topics, as well as at the start of the meeting for topics not on the agenda. To ensure the Board has the opportunity to conduct all business on the agenda, public testimony will be limited to 30 minutes per agenda item. A sign-up sheet will be available to facilitate public comment. Written comments may be submitted in advance of the meeting to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">Boardofforestry@oregon.gov.

A livestream option will be available for those who wish to view the meeting remotely. For more details, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Meeting materials are available at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

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The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.

Oregon Department of Forestry announces new Board Members - 10/22/18

SALEM, Ore – The Oregon Department of Forestry welcomes three new Board Members. Governor Kate Brown announced her nomination of Joe Justice, Brenda McComb, and Jim Kelly on Aug. 30, 2018. The Oregon State Senate confirmed appointees on Sept. 26 with their term beginning on Sept. 28, 2018. The incoming Board Members replace Sybil Ackerman-Munson, Tom Insko, and Gary Springer.

“We are immensely appreciative of Governor Brown’s appointment of our newest board members,” said Tom Imeson, Board Chair. “Each of these individuals bring unique strengths and diverse perspectives that will benefit Oregon’s forests and Oregonians.”

Joe Justice is the Region Manager of Hancock Forest Management lands in northeast Oregon. He is the President of the East Oregon Forest Protection Association and has also served as a member of the Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee. Joe has been a member of the La Grande School Board for the past seven years and is currently the chair.

Justice began his career in forestry as a regeneration forester in the Oregon coast range. He has worked on the land he currently manages in La Grande since 2000, starting as a silviculturist and eventually moving into logging administration, log marketing and management. He holds a degree in Forest Management from Oregon State University.

Brenda McComb retired as Vice Provost for Academic Affairs at Oregon State University (OSU) in 2016 and is Professor Emerita in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at OSU. She currently serves as the Interim Associate Vice Provost and Dean of Students at Stanford University. She has previously served on the faculty at the University of Kentucky, University of Massachusetts Amherst, and OSU. She also served one year as chief of the Watershed Ecology Branch for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Corvallis.

McComb earned a BS and MS from the University of Connecticut, and a PhD in Forestry from Louisiana State University. She continues to advise graduate students working on forest habitat selection studies, teaches graduate and professional education courses, and is a consultant on forest management issues.

Jim Kelly is an entrepreneur with a long history of civic involvement. Since 1999, he has owned and managed a ranch that produces grass-fed beef in rural Grant County. Jim has served on Boards of 1000 Friends of Oregon, the Portland Housing Authority, and Business for Social Responsibility. He is co-founder of the Oregon Business Association and served on that organization’s Board for 17 years.

Kelly is a lifelong Oregonian who grew up in northeast Portland and founded a successful hardware company. He is also co-founder of the North Star Civic Foundation, a small Oregon non-profit involved with public policy issues.

Outgoing Board Members include Sybil Ackerman-Munson, Consultant at Ackerman-Munson Strategies, who concluded her second term of service June 2018. Tom Insko, President of Eastern Oregon University, concluded his second term of service August 2018. Gary Springer, a forester with Starker Forests in Corvallis, concluded his second term of service June 2016.

Board Chair Tom Imeson, joined by ODF staff, have expressed deep appreciation for the service given by all three departing Board Members.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. The term of office is four years, and no member may serve more than two consecutive full terms. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base.

More information on the Board of Forestry can be found at www.oregon.gov/odf/board.

NOTE: Photos of the new board members will be posted on the website in late November.

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