Salem Police Dept.
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News Releases
Skimming Device
Skimming Device
Suspects Arrested In Regional Skimming/Fraud Scheme (Photo) - 05/01/15
**** UPDATE ****
Attached is the correct photo of Evaristo Hernandez-Vazquez


Three suspects have been arrested by Salem Police Detectives in a regional scam that involves the skimming of credit and debit cards and the subsequent fraudulent use of the personal information gained to illegally purchase thousands of dollars of manufactured goods.

The suspects: 37-year old Evaristo Hernandez-Vazquez; 30-year old Hector Hernandez-Vazquez and 39-year old Norma Hernandez-Vazquez, all of San Fernando, California, were all arrested and lodged in the Marion County Jail on April 23. All were charged with Aggravated Identity Theft, Fraudulent Use of a Credit Card, Theft in the First Degree by Deception and seven counts of Identity Theft. Bail for each was set at $220,000.00

The scheme first came to the attention of the Salem Police Department on April 9, 2015 when representatives of the Maps Credit Union and Pioneer Trust Bank in Salem reported fraudulent transactions that involved counterfeit debit cards for several of their customers. Columbia Bank also reported similar activity on the following week with some of their customers.

Investigators believe that a skimming device was used to collect data from credit and debit cards as they were used to pay for purchases. A skimming device is an electronic item that is placed on the credit/debit card reader on machines such as ATMs, gas pumps and other automated readers. The skimming device secretly collects the data from these cards and allows the crooks to gain enough information to use the unsuspecting cardholders' data to make fraudulent purchases. Investigators were able to locate a single point where the victims had all used their cards, a gas station on Lancaster Dr SE. They believe this occurred in March, 2015. The pumps at this gas station have since been inspected, but no skimming device was found. However, a skimming device was found at another gas station on March 11, 2015.

The investigation showed that that the counterfeit debit cards were used to purchase expensive electronics, clothing, and gift cards from cities from Medford, Oregon to Vancouver, Washington. The loss in these cases was over $8,400.00. Surveillance photos showed multiple Hispanic males and a female committing these crimes. Those photos were forwarded to retail outlets throughout the region.

On April 21, a loss prevention officer at Fred Meyer in Vancouver, Washington recognized three suspects who matched the description of the suspects and was able to get a photo of the suspects and their van with California license plates. The suspect and vehicle information were forwarded to law enforcement agencies in the area.

On April 22, Beaverton Police Detective Jason Buelt located the suspects in a hotel in Beaverton and followed them when they left, eventually taking them into custody and seizing large boxes that they were attempting to mail.

Subsequent search warrants served on the hotel room, vehicle and the boxes that the suspects were mailing yielded over 100 fraudulent credit/debit cards, multiple items of high end electronics, new articles of brand name clothing, gift cards, nearly $3,500 in currency and a Louis Vuitton handbag valued at over $3,000.

This investigation was coordinated by Salem Police Detective Michael Korcek with the assistance of the Beaverton Police Department, Marion County Sheriff's Office and several other law enforcement agencies. The investigation will continue as investigators attempt to locate and identify more victims in this case, and additional charges may be filed.

Said Detective Korcek, "These suspects were very prolific in their activities and were able to steal thousands of dollars worth of goods, services and gift cards. They were very sophisticated in their actions and showed how much damage they can do in a short period of time." Korcek also urges anyone who has gas pumps that take credit/debit/ATM cards to check their machines for anything suspicious. Open the machine and make sure nothing foreign has been placed in the area or connected to the card. These devices are usually inserted at night, after the business is closed. They are often in place for days, so they may be discovered if the machines are inspected daily. If anything is located, contact your local law enforcement agency. For consumers, always examine the credit card slot area of any machine you are using and look for anything suspicious. If you're not sure, don't use the machine and report it to the business and/or the police immediately.

Anyone with further information on this case is asked to contact Detective Michael Korcek at 503-588-6050, extension 7159.

Photos of the suspects and of a skimming device are attached to this release
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Suspect arrested thanks to Twitter tipster (Photo) - 04/30/15
April 30, 2015 Salem, OR: Today detectives arrested 19-year old Alejandro Silva in the incident involving the sex abuse of a 16-year old girl at a local Salem clothing store on April 12.

A press release was issued yesterday, April 29, asking for the public's help in identifying the suspect. Thanks to a Twitter follower who saw the photo attached to the tweet, the suspect was identified as Silva.

Silva has been charged with Harassment and Sex Abuse III.

The Salem Police Department thanks all the followers on our social media accounts. The communication tools have proved useful in creating a dialogue with Salem citizens, yet social media has also served as another way to help keep the community safe.

#S #P #D


ATT: 043015 Silva arrest.jpg
Attached Media Files: 043015_Silva_arrest.jpg
Officer Brian Frazzini (left) and Officer Alex Asay (right).
Officer Brian Frazzini (left) and Officer Alex Asay (right).
Salem officers awarded for excellence in the field of drug use recognition (Photo) - 04/29/15
Two Salem Police officers were presented with officer of the year awards by the Oregon DUII Multi-Disciplinary Impaired Driving Task Force on Friday, April 24, 2015.

Officer Brian Frazzini and Officer Alex Asay were recognized for demonstrating excellence in the field of drug impairment recognition by being active in DUII prevention through detection and prosecution.

"Three recipients were selected through a peer nomination process," said Lieutenant Keith Blair of the Patrol Division, "and we are very proud to have had two officers from our agency receive the top honors."

Both Frazzini and Asay have been certified drug recognition experts since 2006 and 2008, respectively. Officer Frazzini is also a trainer in the discipline, and teaches other officers to recognize impairment in drivers under the influence of alcohol and drugs.

For officers to attain certification in the field of drug recognition, they must participate in competitive application process which demonstrates their skills and abilities. They must also receive a recommendation by their agency and the local prosecutor. An intensive training program prepares them for national certification through the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

"We appreciate the time and dedication that Officers Frazzini and Asay put into keeping our community safe," shared Blair.

The Oregon DUII Multi-Disciplinary Impaired Driving Task Force is a nonprofit organization which provides training to state, local, and professional partners involved in the deterrence of impaired driving.

#S#P#D
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Salem Police Ask For Assistance in Identifying Sexual Abuse Suspect (Photo) - 04/29/15
Salem Police Detectives are asking for assistance in identifying a suspect who grabbed a 16-year old female in a sexual manner in a Salem clothing store.

The incident occurred on April 12 at the TX Maxx clothing store located on Commercial St NE in Salem. The 16-year old victim was just exiting a fitting room at the store when the suspect approached her and touched her back. When she turned to see who had touched her, the suspect tried to engage her in conversation. The victim did the right thing and told him that she would not talk to him and turned to get away at which time he touched her in a sexual area. As she continued to try and get away he grabbed her by arm, but she was able to pull away and flee down the aisle and notify store employees. The victim was not physically injured.

The suspect is described as a Hispanic male adult, approximately 19 years old, approximately 5'08" tall with short dark hair and wearing a grey sweatshirt and shorts. Surveillance photos of the suspect are attached.

Anyone with information on this case is asked to contact Salem Police Detective Jeff Staples at 503-588-6050, extension 7151.
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Active shooting incident in progress (Photo) - 04/24/15
******* UPDATE ********
04-24-15/9:05 pm

Shortly after 11:00 am on April 24, Salem Police Officers made contact with a person whom they believed to be wanted near the parking area of the Walmart store located at 1940 Turner Rd SE. During the contact with the male suspect, he fled into a bus that had been converted into a recreational vehicle and refused to comply with commands to come out.

Officer Trevor Morrison and his canine Baco also responded to assist. The suspect came out of the vehicle and there was an exchange of gunfire between the suspect and the officers. No officers were injured, but Baco was shot in the head and the suspect retreated back into the vehicle. Baco was evacuated for emergency veterinary care as officers secured the area. Baco was released a short time later with only minor injury and was cleared to go home.

Officers from Salem Police Department, Keizer Police Department, Marion County Sheriff's Office and Oregon State Police all responded to the scene to set a safety perimeter and assist.

The Salem Police Department SWAT Team responded, secured the area and immediately began negotiating with the suspect in an effort to get him to surrender. Negotiators spoke with the suspect for several hours in an effort to get him to surrender peacefully. He also fired multiple shots from the vehicle out towards officers, at one time narrowly missing a SWAT officer.

As the negotiations and shots continued, the Marion County Sheriff's Office, Oregon State Police and Portland Police Bureau sent additional tactical officers and equipment to assist in the situation.

After several hours of negotiations, tactical officers used specialized vehicles to open up the walls of the vehicle in order to be able to see where the suspect was and what he was doing. Once the inside of the vehicle was exposed, the suspect refused to comply and continued to brandish a handgun. At that time, approximately 6:28 pm, tactical officers fired at the suspect and were able to eventually take him into custody. No officers were injured.

The suspect is not being identified at this time and he has since died of his injuries. The Salem Police officers involved in the initial incident were Officers Chad Galusha, Officer Robert Owings, Corporal Tim Dezotell and Canine Officer Trevor Morrison. The tactical officers involved in the shooting of the suspect are Officer Joshua Edmiston, Officer Vincent Dawson and Officer Sean Bennett

As standard procedure, the Salem Police Department has requested the Oregon State Police investigate this incident, and the investigation will continue in conjunction with the Marion County District Attorney's Office as is standard procedure for incidents of this nature. The officers directly involved in the shooting will be placed on administrative leave as standard protocol following a traumatic use of force incident.

Further media information will be through the Oregon State Police.



04-24-15/3:40 pm

The situation on Turner Rd is still an active tactical situation. The suspect has fired more shots from inside of the vehicle, but there have been no further injuries.

Lt Okada will be at Mission St/Turner Rd at 4:00 pm to provide further interviews as needed


04-24-15/3:05 pm

Tactical teams are continuing efforts to resolve the situation on Turner Rd SE. This remains a tactical and dynamic situation. Further information will be released as it becomes available.



The Salem Police canine that was injured in today's incident is Baco. Baco has been treated at an animal hospital and has been released to go home. Baco's handler is Officer Trevor Morrison.



***** Lt Okada will be available for media interviews at 12:30 pm near the north perimeter of the incident, Mission St/Turner Rd


The Salem Police Department is on scene at a shooting incident in the 1900 block of Turner Rd. SE. Shots have been exchanged, and a Salem Police canine has been injured. No Salem police officers have been injured.

This is an active tactical situation, please avoid the area until further notice. Furthermore, because the situation is evolving tactically, we ask that those in the vicinity refrain from posting information about the incident.

###
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Salem Police Chief Jerry Moore Honored With Prestigious Award (Photo) - 04/16/15
Salem Police Chief Jerry Moore was honored at the Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) conference in Bend on April 15 with the prestigious Karlyn Campbell award.

The award is presented to the member who has provided exemplary service and support to OACP and has distinguished themselves as a mentor to others in the organization. The recipient offers guidance and encouragement to those around them and displays a nurturing nature that cultivates professional growth. Emblazoned on the impressive award was the following inscription, "You have always displayed a compassionate mentoring demeanor, offering guidance and encouragement to those around you. Your nurturing nature has cultivated the professional growth of numerous law enforcement executives in our association."

OACP was formed in 1953 with a mission to promote and enhance the highest ethical and professional standards in law enforcement at all levels throughout Oregon. The Association is proud to have over 200 members consisting of not only chiefs of police, but also other law enforcement and public sector partners.
Salem Police to Continue Specialized DUII Enforcement Campaigns - 04/08/15
The Salem Police Department will be continuing with specialized patrols to target those who are Driving Under The Influence of Intoxicants.

The overtime patrols shifts, funded by Oregon Impact, will continue to focus on the very dangerous issue of driving while impaired. On March 6th, an officer who was working on one of these focused patrols arrested one person for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants while issuing an additional 19 citations and warnings to other drivers for other violations.

The Salem Police Department and our partners such as Oregon Impact are committed to keeping our community safe through traffic safety enforcement and education.
Salem Police Warn of Scam with Suspects Claiming to be Law Enforcement - 04/04/15
The Salem Police Department would like to warn the public about a telephone scam that was recently reported where callers represented themselves to be FBI Agents and Chief Jerry Moore of the Salem Police Department.

The intended victim in this case is an elderly victim who reported that he received a phone call at his residence on the afternoon of March 31, 2015. The victim's caller ID showed the call as coming from "US Government." The caller identified himself as "Agent George Mason" of the FBI and provided a badge number. The caller told the victim that he had won the Publisher's Clearninghouse Sweepstakes but their information showed the victim was deceased, and the victim needed to send $1,000 to establish his identity and prove he was still alive. The victim was immediately suspicious of the call, and even more so when the caller told him that the intended victim should wire the money to the victim's own wife, who was actually with the victim at his residence, in Mexico because the winnings had been involved in some type of fraud.

The astute victim told the caller that he didn't believe him and said that he would not send any money anywhere until he spoke with the "Police Chief." Within an hour the victim got a call with the caller ID showing "City of Salem." This caller identified himself as "Police Chief Jerry Moore," who assured the victim that he had spoken with Agent Mason, that the call from Agent Mason was legitimate and that the FBI was waiting for the victim's $1,000.

The victim next received a phone call on April 2 from a male claiming to be "Jerry Moore" at the Salem Police Department, who told the victim that he had contacted Publisher's Clearinghouse and that this was not a scam and the victim had really won. The caller congratulated the victim and promised to be in touch later. Soon after, the victim received another call from "Agent Mason," who said he had been in touch with "Jerry Moore" and again instructed the victim to wire $1,000 to the victim's wife in Mexico.

The victim wisely did not wire any money anywhere but instead came to the Salem Police Department to report the incident. He did receive one more call with the caller ID showing the number for the main FBI office in Washington, DC.

The Salem Police Department would like to remind the public that there are multiple types of phone scams that occur on a regular basis. Often times the suspects will impersonate police officers as this one did, and the suspects even use phone spoofing technology to make the call appear to be from legitimate law enforcement agencies. In past phone scams, some of the suspects have used names of other Salem Police Officers. Scammers will also sometimes include links to bogus websites that look very realistic, but are in place to give potential victims a false sense of legitimacy to the call or to get victims to give personal information such as passwords or account information.

Government agencies will not typically endorse nor confirm sweepstakes winnings. If someone claims to be from a government agency and gives you a name, don't be fooled by official sounding titles or caller ID readings. Look up the number for that agency independently either on the internet or from a phone book and call only the numbers you find there and report the incident. Never give out account or password information over the phone or internet. Anyone with a legitimate need to know will already have that information. Lastly, never send or wire money anywhere unless you can absolutely verify to whom you are sending it and that the person is legitimate. Always verify information independently through the use of the internet or phone book instead of using links or numbers that are sent to you.
Salem Police Warn of Scam with Suspects Claiming to be Law Enforcement - 04/04/15
The Salem Police Department would like to warn the public about a telephone scam that was recently reported where callers represented themselves to be FBI Agents and Chief Jerry Moore of the Salem Police Department.

The intended victim in this case is an elderly victim who reported that he received a phone call at his residence on the afternoon of March 31, 2015. The victim's caller ID showed the call as coming from "US Government." The caller identified himself as "Agent George Mason" of the FBI and provided a badge number. The caller told the victim that he had won the Publisher's Clearninghouse Sweepstakes but their information showed the victim was deceased, and the victim needed to send $1,000 to establish his identity and prove he was still alive. The victim was immediately suspicious of the call, and even more so when the caller told him that the intended victim should wire the money to the victim's own wife, who was actually with the victim at his residence, in Mexico because the winnings had been involved in some type of fraud.

The astute victim told the caller that he didn't believe him and said that he would not send any money anywhere until he spoke with the "Police Chief." Within an hour the victim got a call with the caller ID showing "City of Salem." This caller identified himself as "Police Chief Jerry Moore," who assured the victim that he had spoken with Agent Mason, that the call from Agent Mason was legitimate and that the FBI was waiting for the victim's $1,000.

The victim next received a phone call on April 2 from a male claiming to be "Jerry Moore" at the Salem Police Department, who told the victim that he had contacted Publisher's Clearinghouse and that this was not a scam and the victim had really won. The caller congratulated the victim and promised to be in touch later. Soon after, the victim received another call from "Agent Mason," who said he had been in touch with "Jerry Moore" and again instructed the victim to wire $1,000 to the victim's wife in Mexico.

The victim wisely did not wire any money anywhere but instead came to the Salem Police Department to report the incident. He did receive one more call with the caller ID showing the number for the main FBI office in Washington, DC.

The Salem Police Department would like to remind the public that there are multiple types of phone scams that occur on a regular basis. Often times the suspects will impersonate police officers as this one did, and the suspects even use phone spoofing technology to make the call appear to be from legitimate law enforcement agencies. In past phone scams, some of the suspects have used names of other Salem Police Officers. Scammers will also sometimes include links to bogus websites that look very realistic, but are in place to give potential victims a false sense of legitimacy to the call or to get victims to give personal information such as passwords or account information.

Government agencies will not typically endorse nor confirm sweepstakes winnings. If someone claims to be from a government agency and gives you a name, don't be fooled by official sounding titles or caller ID readings. Look up the number for that agency independently either on the internet or from a phone book and call only the numbers you find there and report the incident. Never give out account or password information over the phone or internet. Anyone with a legitimate need to know will already have that information. Lastly, never send or wire money anywhere unless you can absolutely verify to whom you are sending it and that the person is legitimate. Always verify information independently through the use of the internet or phone book instead of using links or numbers that are sent to you.