Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept.
Emergency Messages as of 12:25 am, Tue. Nov. 21
No information currently posted. Operating as usual.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. Please use any browser other than Internet Explorer.
Primary email address for a new account:

Emergency Alerts News Releases  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
Grants awarded for heritage projects throughout the state [correction] - 11/16/17

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 18 grants totaling $230,000 to organizations across the state for projects that conserve, develop and interpret Oregon's cultural heritage. Projects range from exhibits to oral history and awards range from $2,000-$20,000.

Funded organizations include:
* Abernethy Elementary School PTA, in Portland, for the restoration of a WPA mural in the school.
* Astoria Public Library to organize historic archives.
* Benton County Historical Society and Museum for conservation of historic objects to be displayed in the new museum in Corvallis.
* Butte Creek Mill Foundation for the restoration of the Butte Creek Mill destroyed by fire in Eagle Point.
* Chetco Historical Memorial Committee for enhancements to the Chetco Indian Memorial site in Brookings.
* Cottage Grove Museum for improvements to an exhibit about a survivor of the wreck of the Titanic including the jacket worn by her onboard.
* Four Rivers Cultural Center, in Ontario, for the restoration of the Harano photography neon sign.
* Gorge Owned, in Hood River, for the development and marketing of two podcasts about Columbia River Gorge history.
* High Desert Museum, in Deschutes County, for improvements to the Frontier Days school program.
* Illinois Valley Community Development Organization, in Cave Junction, to create and perform an original production about food farm heritage.
* Linn County Historical Museum, in Brownsville, for improvements to the exhibit about the history of the local indigenous people.
* Oregon Historical Society, in Portland, to develop and implement the Indigenous Oregon History series for Tribes to share history and culture with broad public audiences.
* Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, in Portland, to evaluate and update a walking tour with added stories and sites exploring South Portland's historic, cultural, ethnic and racial dynamics.
* Oregon Nikkei Endowment, in Portland, to digitize, to translate and publish on-line two collections; FBI documents from the Koyama Family and 10 special issues of Oregon Nippo, a Japanese language newspaper.
* The Vanport Mosaic, in Portland, to collect and present the history of the northeast Portland neighborhood of Albina 1950s-1980s through multimedia oral histories, a new play, and engagement activities.
* Umatilla County Historical Society, in Pendleton, to complete phase three of the Umatilla Gold: The History of Wheat in Umatilla County exhibit.
* The University of Oregon, in Eugene, to provide training and equipment to the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs to digitize photographs, slides, and scrapbooks that will be annotated by community members and published to the tribes' online, digital collection.
* Whiteaker Community Council to conduct 10 oral histories, digitize photos in private collections, and upload these to its website.
This competitive grant program is for qualifying organizations, and is offered once per biennium. It is a program of the Oregon Heritage Commission, comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

The Commission is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. To learn more about the Oregon Heritage Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Grants awarded for heritage projects throughout the state - 11/16/17

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 18 grants totaling $230,000 to organizations across the state for projects that conserve, develop and interpret Oregon's cultural heritage. Projects range from exhibits to oral history and awards range from $2,000-$20,000.

Funded organizations include:
* Abernethy Elementary School PTA, in Portland, for the restoration of a WPA mural in the school.
* Astoria Public Library to organize historic archives.
* Benton County Historical Society and Museum for conservation of historic objects to be displayed in the new museum in Corvallis.
* Butte Creek Mill Foundation for the restoration of the Butte Creek Mill destroyed by fire in Eagle Creek.
* Chetco Historical Memorial Committee for enhancements to the Chetco Indian Memorial site in Brookings.
* Cottage Grove Museum for improvements to an exhibit about a survivor of the wreck of the Titanic including the jacket worn by her onboard.
* Four Rivers Cultural Center, in Ontario, for the restoration of the Harano photography neon sign.
* Gorge Owned, in Hood River, for the development and marketing of two podcasts about Columbia River Gorge history.
* High Desert Museum, in Deschutes County, for improvements to the Frontier Days school program.
* Illinois Valley Community Development Organization, in Cave Junction, to create and perform an original production about food farm heritage.
* Linn County Historical Museum, in Brownsville, for improvements to the exhibit about the history of the local indigenous people.
* Oregon Historical Society, in Portland, to develop and implement the Indigenous Oregon History series for Tribes to share history and culture with broad public audiences.
* Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, in Portland, to evaluate and update a walking tour with added stories and sites exploring South Portland's historic, cultural, ethnic and racial dynamics.
* Oregon Nikkei Endowment, in Portland, to digitize, to translate and publish on-line two collections; FBI documents from the Koyama Family and 10 special issues of Oregon Nippo, a Japanese language newspaper.
* The Vanport Mosaic, in Portland, to collect and present the history of the northeast Portland neighborhood of Albina 1950s-1980s through multimedia oral histories, a new play, and engagement activities.
* Umatilla County Historical Society, in Pendleton, to complete phase three of the Umatilla Gold: The History of Wheat in Umatilla County exhibit.
* The University of Oregon, in Eugene, to provide training and equipment to the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs to digitize photographs, slides, and scrapbooks that will be annotated by community members and published to the tribes' online, digital collection.
* Whiteaker Community Council to conduct 10 oral histories, digitize photos in private collections, and upload these to its website.
This competitive grant program is for qualifying organizations, and is offered once per biennium. It is a program of the Oregon Heritage Commission, comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

The Commission is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. To learn more about the Oregon Heritage Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.



###

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department accepting comments on proposed adoption of master plans for Tryon Creek State Natural Area and parks in the Columbia Gorge - 11/15/17

Portland OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is in the final stage of approving two planning documents, one for state parks in the Columbia Gorge and one for Portland's Tryon Creek State Natural Area. The department is accepting comments through Dec. 29 on a proposal to adopt the two master plans, which guide recreation use and resource management for the next 20 years. This culminates an extensive public process that began in 2013 and included public meetings and a land use review by city and county officials.

The plans detail current natural and cultural resource conditions, outdoor recreation trends and how to balance recreation and resource protection. They set priorities for the next two decades, such as adding or improving trails, parking, facilities and signs. Both plans are available at oregon.gov/oprd/PLANS.

TRYON CREEK
Tryon Creek State Natural Area, a 650-acre day-use park with more than 14 miles of trails, is situated in both southeast Portland and Lake Oswego. As part of the process of drafting the plan, OPRD planners gathered comments from an advisory committee, park neighbors and the general public during meetings and written comment periods held between February and July 2013. The Oregon State Parks Commission approved the content of the draft plan in July 2013.

Officials from both Portland and Lake Oswego reviewed the draft for compatibility with zoning codes. OPRD planners made minor changes as a result.

COLUMBIA GORGE
The draft master plan for the Columbia Gorge Management Unit covers 15 parks, six natural areas, three scenic viewpoints, six scenic corridors, and 47 trailheads connecting visitors with more than 150 miles of spectacular trails located in Hood River, Multnomah and Wasco Counties. The document replaces the previous plan, adopted in 1994.

As part of the process of drafting the plan, planners gathered comments from an advisory committee, park neighbors and the general public during meetings and written comment periods held between August 2013 and October 2014. The Oregon State Parks Commission approved the content of the Columbia Gorge Management Unit Master Plan at their meeting on February 11, 2015. The draft plan was then reviewed by Hood River, Multnomah and Wasco counties for compatibility with their comprehensive plans and zoning codes.

The full text of the amendment to Oregon Administrative Rule 736-018-0045 is available online at oregon.gov/oprd. Click on Rules and Regulations on the right side of the page. (oregon.gov/oprd/RULES ) Comments will be accepted until 5 p.m. Dec. 29, 2017 and can be made online; in writing to Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, attn.: Katie Gauthier, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301; or through e-mail to OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov.

After reviewing public comments, agency staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its February 2018 business meeting.

Salmonberry Trail meeting set Dec. 1, 2017 - 11/15/17

Banks OR - The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency will meet in Banks Dec. 1 to discuss issues related to ownership and management of the proposed 84 mile Salmonberry Trail corridor that will connect the cities of Tillamook and Banks. The meeting will be from 1 -- 4 p.m. at the Banks Fire District #13, 13430 NW Main St.

The agenda includes a discussion on the status of rail banking, fundraising efforts, valley segment planning and a benefit analysis study.

The Salmonberry Trail will connect eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the rugged Oregon Coast Range. The route follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway, which closed in 2007 after massive storm damage. The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information, contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov.

Foster-Simmons House
Foster-Simmons House
Foster-Simmons House listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 11/14/17

The Foster-Simmons House in Eugene, Lane County is among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Foster-Simmons House, located at 417 E 13th Avenue, in the West University neighborhood of Eugene, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as an excellent, nearly intact example of the Craftsman style of residential architecture. It was built for $3000 in 1913 by attorney Orla H. Foster and his wife, Maidee, who lived in the house until 1921, when it was sold to Earl C. Simmons, owner of the E.C. Simmons Ford Dealership. After passing through a series of short-term owners, the house was offered for rent to University students beginning during the 1930s. From the 1940s until 1975, the home was owned and occupied by Mabel and Elroy Reagan. Since 1975, the house has been the home of the Eugene chapter of Young Life, a Christian youth support and development organization. The three-bedroom house displays many characteristic features of the Craftsman style, including varied exterior siding and window types, open eaves, a projecting front porch with heavy concrete piers and exposed structural elements, and a modest porte cochere. Interior elements include an open floor plan, built-in features, and an abundance of simple but elegant woodwork. The house retains a high degree of interior and exterior integrity, and clearly conveys its style and period of construction through its original form, features, and materials. As one of only six single-family Craftsman dwellings in the fragile West University area that have been evaluated as being National Register-eligible, the Foster-Simmons House is a stand-out example of its type in the neighborhood and in Eugene.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the Foster-Simmons House for nomination during their June 2017 meeting and on October 30, 2017, the house was formally listed by the Keeper of the National Register in Washington DC. The Foster-Simmons House is now one of 61 buildings in Eugene that are individually honored by listing in the National Register. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Reed-Cobb-Bowser House
Reed-Cobb-Bowser House
Reed-Cobb-Bowser House and Barn listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 11/14/17

The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House and Barn in Merlin, Josephine County is among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House and Barn is located on Merlin Road in the unincorporated town of Merlin, approximately seven miles northwest of Grants Pass, in rural Josephine County. Built in 1910-11, the 2-1/2 story Craftsman-style house is associated with early 20th century movement in many parts of western Oregon to promote residential-agricultural development on relatively small, usually 5 to 10-acre parcels. In 1909, a group of wealthy investors led by brothers William T. and Franklin E. Reed began purchasing property around Merlin for the purpose of both speculating on the land itself and fostering the development of an orchard economy in the area. The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House was originally built in 1910-11 as the headquarters and clubhouse for what became known as the Country Club Orchard development, as well as the residence of William T. Reed's daughters, Grace and Marian Reed. Though initially successful, the project soon faltered, and by the early 1920s, undeveloped land began to be sold off to satisfy debt. The house remained in the ownership of William T. Reed, who, upon his death in 1924, passed ownership to Marian and Grace. Grace lived in the house with her husband, Everett Cobb until 1936, when the house was sold to miner Heber E. Bowser and his wife, Clementine, the wealthy heiress of Portland family wealth. Clementine, in addition to owning and managing several successful mines in the area, was also a well-known equestrian, and is responsible for the large and well-appointed horse barn that accompanies the house on the National Register. In addition to its association with the events of local development, the house is also recognized as an exceptional example of the Craftsman style of architecture, widely popular across the United States during the early 20th century.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the district's nomination during their June 2017 meeting, and on October 30, 2017, the house and barn were formally listed by the Keeper of the National Register in Washington DC. The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House and Barn are the second property in Merlin, Josephine County, to be listed in the National Register. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Redmond Downtown Historic District
Redmond Downtown Historic District
Redmond Downtown Historic District listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 11/14/17

The Redmond Downtown Historic District in Deschutes County is among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Redmond Downtown Historic District embraces the historic commercial core of Redmond, including 43 downtown buildings located primarily along SW 6th Street roughly between SW Forest Avenue and SW Cascade Avenue. The historic district reflects the period of economic and commercial growth in Redmond between 1910 and 1960, beginning with the years shortly after the founding of the city, when the earliest remaining downtown buildings were constructed, up through the end of major expansion in the post-World War II era. During this period, the population of Redmond expanded from 216 in 1910 to 3,340 in 1960. Architecturally, the district demonstrates the continuity of dominant design styles during the pre-war period of the twentieth century, including Colonial Revival, Classical Revival, Art Deco, and Streamlined Moderne styles, and extending to the early post-war architectural styles, in particular, the International Style.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the district's nomination during their June 2017 meeting and on October 30, 2017, the district was formally listed by the Keeper of the National Register in Washington DC. The Redmond Downtown Historic District is now one of six listings in the National Register, and the second historic district in the city to be listed. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Peacock Lane Historic District
Peacock Lane Historic District
Peacock Lane Historic District listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 11/14/17

Peacock Lane, a small, distinctive neighborhood comprising 32 residences located between SE Stark and SE Belmont Streets, in place of SE 40th Avenue in the east Portland grid. It was developed as a small, planned community between 1923 and 1930 by Richard Fleming Wassell, real estate developer and designer of most of the houses in the district. The district is well-known throughout the City of Portland for its collection of uniquely unified residential architecture, all of which reflect Tudor Revival and English Cottage styles based on medieval European precedents. The Peacock Lane Historic District is listed in the National Register of Historic Places for its unified architectural design language, and for its early accommodation of the automobile, most notably demonstrated by the inclusion of attached and detached garages on every property. In addition to these features, for which the district was listed through the Multiple Property Submission, "Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960," the district is widely recognized for its highly-anticipated annual Christmas Lights display, which draws thousands of visitors to the district during the holiday season.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the district's nomination during their June 2017 meeting, and on October 30, 2017, the district was formally listed by the Keeper of the National Register in Washington DC. The Peacock Lane Historic District is now one of 18 historic districts in the City of Portland that are listed in the National Register. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Parking fee waived for 'Green Friday' at Oregon State Parks - 11/09/17

RE-ISSUED: CORRECTED DATE IN FOURTH PARAGRAPH

Oregon State Parks invites you to play for free on Nov. 24 in celebration of 'Green Friday.' The agency will waive day-use parking fees in 26 Oregon State Parks the day after Thanksgiving.

"We started this tradition three years ago to encourage people to opt outside," said OPRD director Lisa Sumption. "Why not get some fresh air with your family and create a new holiday tradition?"

To help celebrate, the nonprofit Oregon State Parks Foundation is offering free hot drinks and snacks at Tryon Creek State Natural Area, Fort Stevens State Park, Rooster Rock State Park, Silver Falls State Park and Cape Blanco State Park. Refreshments -- donated by Starbucks Coffee, Nossa Familia Coffee, Smith Tea, Stevens Cocoa and KIND Bars -- will be served by volunteers from the local Friends Groups.

Parking is free year-round at almost all state parks; the waiver applies to the 26 parks that charge $5 daily for parking. The waiver applies from open to close on Nov. 24, except at Shore Acres State Park, where it expires at 3 p.m. for the Holiday Lights event that runs Thanksgiving through New Year's Eve. A list of parks that require day-use parking permits is at bit.ly/OregonStateParksParking.

Daily parking permits can be purchased on site, but one- and two-year passes are also available online at store.oregonstateparks.org.

Visit the Oregon State Parks website for directions to each park: oregonstateparks.org.

Beth Dehn selected as Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator - 11/03/17

Beth Dehn of Clackamas County has been selected to serve as Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator. She began her role on November 1, 2017.

Beth Dehn is a public folklorist with over 10 years of experience managing cultural programs in museums and educational settings. She comes to Oregon Heritage from Road Scholar, an educational travel nonprofit for adults and intergenerational learners. Previously Dehn served as the Director of Education at the Washington County Museum where she expanded the museum's community outreach and collaborated with Pacific University and local organizations on the Washington County Heritage Online project and Washington County Oral Histories digitization initiative. Dehn also served as Educational Outreach Assistant at the Museum of Natural & Cultural History and has taught internationally through Fulbright and the JET Programme. Dehn holds a BA in English & Spanish from Buena Vista University and an MA in Folklore from the University of Oregon with a Museum Studies Certificate.

"We are pleased to welcome Beth aboard," said Chrissy Curran, director of Heritage Division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, where the commission is housed. "Her breadth of experience and enthusiasm for the work make her a great fit for the position."

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov or visit the Commission's website at www.oregonheritage.org.

Cottonwood Canyon State Park and the John Day River
Cottonwood Canyon State Park and the John Day River
Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will meet November 14-15 in Cascade Locks (Photo) - 10/31/17

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // October 31, 2017

Media Contact: Chris Havel // 503-986-0722 | cell: 503-931-2590 // chris.havel@oregon.gov

Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will meet November 14-15 in Cascade Locks

Salem, OR - The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will hold its fifth and final meeting of the year November 14-15, participating in a field tour and training on the first day, and conducting executive and business meetings the second day.

On November 14, Commissioners will gather at 8:30 a.m. in Cascade Locks to begin a tour of parks and historic sites in the western end of the Columbia River Gorge, followed by a 1 p.m. training workshop at the Cascade Locks Pavilion in the city's Marine Park, 395 SW Portage Rd, Cascade Locks OR 97014.

On November 15, Commissioners will convene an executive session at 8:15 a.m. at the Best Western Columbia River Inn Conference Room, 735 Wa Na Pa St, Cascade Locks OR 97014, to discuss real estate and legal issues. Executive sessions are closed to the public. A public business meeting will begin at approximately 9:30 a.m. at the same location. The agenda includes several information and action items from agency staff, including requests to:

>> Accept a bid of $255,750 to sell an unused 38 acre property on Highway 99W near Monroe. The property, formerly used as a state wayside until water system problems resulted in its closure in 2008, drew three sealed bids during a public auction. The high bid was submitted by Shiloh Forestry, Inc. from Eugene, Oregon. If approved by the commission, revenue from the sale will be placed in an account used to improve the overall state park system.

>> Award a contract to build the Cottonwood Canyon Experience Center at Cottonwood Canyon State Park on the John Day River between Condon and Wasco. The center will be used for formal and informal outdoor education at the 8,000+ acre park. Bids on the project have not yet closed, but will before the meeting; the project has a $1.2 million dollar budget, and the nonprofit Oregon State Parks Foundation (http://oregonstateparksfoundation.org/) raised $400,000 toward the effort, which should complete construction by May 2018. Local and regional students use the park to learn about natural and cultural resources, a service that includes the Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute (http://go-stem.org/ccsi/).

Other matters are listed on a draft agenda and the full meeting packet online at http://bit.ly/november2017agenda. People who plan to present testimony are requested to provide 15 copies of their statement to Commission Assistant Denise Warburton at Denise.Warburton@oregon.gov for distribution to the Commissioners before the meeting. Those needing special accommodations to attend should also contact Warburton by email, or by calling 503-986-0719, at least three days in advance.

# # #

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission (www.oregon.gov/oprd/Pages/commission.aspx) promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules, and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department accepting comments on proposal to allow WAG bags on the Deschutes River Scenic Waterway - 10/31/17

Bend OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is proposing changes to portable toilet rules for the Deschutes River Scenic Waterway. The proposed amendment would allow use of Human Waste Bags as an approved portable toilet. Current rules require overnight boaters in the Deschutes River Scenic Waterway to use an approved portable toilet or an agency provided toilet facility for all solid human waste.

Human Waste Bags, commonly called WAG bags, are now very common on rivers in the U.S. They are allowed, by administrative rule, in Oregon on the Owyhee Scenic Waterway and John Day River Scenic Waterway. WAG bags meet environmental requirements and would likely make river conditions more sanitary because they are so convenient.

The proposed rule change is a recommendation from the Lower Deschutes River Interagency Implementation Team and Lower Deschutes River Managers that include representatives from the BLM, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), Confederated Tribes of The Warm Springs Reservation (CTWS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB), Oregon State Police (OSP), Sherman, Wasco and Jefferson counties, as well as the City of Maupin.

The full text of the amendment to Oregon Administrative Rule 736-040-0070 is available online at oregon.gov/oprd. Click on Rules and Regulations on the right side of the page (oregon.gov/oprd/RULES). Comments will be accepted until 5 p.m. Dec. 15, 2017 and can be made online; in writing to Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, attn.: Katie Gauthier, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301; or through e-mail to OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov.

After reviewing public comments, agency staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its February 2018 business meeting.

OPRD seeks to fill positions within two ATV Advisory Committees - 10/26/17

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is recruiting five volunteers with an interest in All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) recreation to serve on the committees that advise on safety, funding and public access for ATV riders.

The department seeks two volunteers for the All-Terrain Vehicle Advisory Committee (ATV-AC) three volunteers to serve on the newly developed All-Terrain Vehicle Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee.

>>ATV Advisory Committee
Members of the ATV Advisory Committee review accidents and fatalities resulting from ATV recreation; changes to statutory vehicle classifications as necessary for safety considerations; and safety features of all classes of Off-Highway Vehicles (OHVs). The committee also recommends appropriate safety requirements to protect child operators and riders of OHVs.

Volunteers should have experience in following disciplines:

> Class II ATV Representative (Sand rails and four wheel drive vehicles, such as Jeeps and SUVs)
> Class III ATV Representative (Off-road motorcycles)

The successful candidate will also serve on the ATV Grant Subcommittee, which is responsible for reviewing and recommending funding of grants in support of ATV recreational activities statewide. Computer access and experience is mandatory. Knowledge of OHV riding areas is beneficial.

The ATV Advisory Committee meets as needed up to four times per year at locations throughout the state to advise OPRD regarding ATV issues relating to safety and vehicle classifications. The ATV Grant Subcommittee also meets as needed up to four times per year at locations throughout the state, including field trips.

>>ATV Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee
Members of the ATV Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee accept, evaluate and conduct field reviews of proposed highway access routes that ATV riders can use to access trails and recreation areas. Committee members also consult with road authorities, law enforcement and other government agencies.

New committee positions include the following:

> All-Terrain Vehicle users (two positions available)
> Member of the public

The ATV Highway Access Route Advisory Committee will meet as needed, primarily in Salem, to review, evaluate, advise and report on proposed access routes on portions of affected state highways. The Oregon Legislature established the All-Terrain Vehicle Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee in 2017 under Senate Bill 344.

Those interested in volunteering on one of the committees must complete an interest form and application for both committees, available through the ATV Committees link within the menu section located online at www.oregonohv.org or by contacting OPRD. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Nov. 3, 2017.

For more information, contact Jeff Trejo at jeff.trejo@oregon.gov or by phone 503-986-0585.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department accepting comments on adding tribal governments to the Veterans' and War Memorial Grant Program - 10/26/17

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting comments on a proposed rule change that would allow tribal governments to apply for Veterans' and War Memorial Grants. The proposed amendments are a result of legislation passed during the 2017 session. Under House Bill 2405, tribal governments were added as an entity eligible to apply for grant funding to build or restore veterans' and war memorials. The deadline for public comment on the amendments is Dec. 15, 2017.

The proposed rules change expands the pool of entities eligible to apply for funding, but does not change the existing grant rules or guarantee funding to any specific groups. The Veterans' and War Memorials Grant Program was established to provide funding for constructing and restoring veterans' and war memorials on public property. More information is available at oregon.gov/OPRD/HCD. Click on Grants on the left side of the page. (http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/FINASST/Pages/grants.aspx#Veterans_and_War_Memorials_Grant)

The full text of the amendments to Oregon Administrative Rule 736-017-0005 and 736-017-0020 is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/RULES. Comments can be made directly on this webpage or in writing to Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, attn.: Katie Gauthier, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301; or through e-mail to OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov. They will be accepted until 5 p.m. Dec. 15, 2017.

Anyone wishing to comment in person may attend a public hearing at 6 p.m. Nov. 28 in Salem's North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street NE, Room 124A.

After reviewing public comments, agency staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its February 2018 business meeting.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department received three bids for surplus property near Monroe - 10/25/17

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // October 25, 2017

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Cell: 503-931-2590


Salem OR -- Between September 22 and October 17, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) accepted sealed bids from parties interested in purchasing an undeveloped 38-acre parcel near the Benton-Lane County border. The property was appraised at $356,000, and the department received three bids ranging from $136,000 to $255,750. OPRD staff will recommend the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission accept the highest bid at its regular public business meeting on November 15, 2017 in Cascade Locks. The sale is contingent on the commission's approval.

The bids received were from Shiloh Forestry of Eugene ($255,570), Lochmead Farms of Junction City ($250,000), and Goshen Forest Products of Eugene ($136,000). All three bids were submitted correctly and were reviewed by OPRD real estate staff and managers.

The property on 99W was formerly used as a highway wayside, but the restroom and sewage systems failed ten years ago and the facilities were removed. The property has been considered a candidate for disposal since 2014, and department property staff prepared it for sale in 2017. As required by state law, the property was first offered to other public agencies before being considered for public sale, but there were no takers.

If the sale is completed, the funds will be placed in a special account used for property transactions that improve the overall state park system. The parcel offered for sale was originally acquired in 1926.

More information on the sale is available online at http://bit.ly/WashburneWSpropertysale, or from Kammie Bunes, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Right of Way Agent, at 503-986-0630 (kammie.bunes@oregon.gov). The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission meets five times per year, and more information on the meeting will be available online at http://bit.ly/november2017agenda in early November.

###

Map of areas at Stub Stewart State Park to be thinned this winter
Map of areas at Stub Stewart State Park to be thinned this winter
Campground, trails to close at Stub Stewart State Park starting Nov. 1 during a four-month forest thinning project (Photo) - 10/25/17

BANKS OR -- Portions of Stub Stewart State Park will be closed starting Nov. 1 through late winter for a forest thinning project designed to improve forest health at the park, according to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). A five-mile portion of the Banks- Vernonia State Trail will also be closed the month of January.

OPRD will thin 550 acres -- about a third of the park-- where Douglas firs are growing so densly that they could become hazardous to visitors, buildings and property. OPRD hired Nevada-based Whisper Jet Helicopters to log by helicopter 25 to 40 percent of the trees in the project area. The company will use local subcontractors for the operation.

"Our goal is to continue improving this relatively new park with minimal disruption on the ground," said Dan Quigley, Stub Stewart park manager. "A natural landscape can support a wide range of recreation, something the people of Washington and Columbia counties and the whole region can enjoy."

The areas selected for thinning contain 15- to 35-year-old Douglas firs that were initially planted very close together. Today's best practice would be to thin stands much earlier in their lifecycle. But that never happened, leaving the existing trees susceptible to storm damage and insect and disease infestation, which puts them at a greater risk of falling on property or people.

These stands average 450 trees per acre -- three times the ideal density of 150 trees per acre. The helicopters are equipped with technology that allows the pilot to select, cut and extract one tree at a time from above. The contractor will send larger logs to a local mill to be turned into lumber; the rest will be chipped for landscaping mulch or turned into biomass material.

Because forest projects in state parks are driven by forest health, rather than revenue, this project is expected to break even at best. The $1.2 million in expected gross revenue will be used to create minimal roads and helicopter landing areas, and fund the materials and labor needed to harvest by helicopter.

"Helicopter logging is ideal for this park," said Nick Morris, forester with OPRD. "Extracting trees from above causes minimal on-the-ground damage compared to traditional logging methods."

Geoff Hall, CEO of Whisper Jet Helicopters, developed specialized equipment for large scale thinning projects, hopes to expand the company's niche from removing trees near power lines to thinning dense swaths of public land.

"We see a huge need for thinning crowded forests, both for disease and fire prevention," said Hall, a pilot with 12 years of helicopter logging experience. "Helicopter logging is the most effective and nonintrusive method to restore the health of our forests. We're looking forward to getting our start at Stub Stewart."

Areas selected for thinning are located around the campgrounds, disc golf course and mountain bike trails, as well as along the five miles of the 21-mile Banks-Vernonia State Trail that crosses through the park.

The Banks-Vernonia Trail between the Buxton and Tophill Trailheads will be open weekends only in January. It will remain open during the other project months.

The most popular areas of Stub Stewart , including the campgrounds, cabins, Hilltop Day-use Area, trails and disc golf course, will be closed completely in January. Park areas will be closed at times during the other project months. Closures are subject to change based on weather and flying conditions. Watch for closure signs on the ground and get the latest closure information at www.oregonstateparks.org.

Helicopters will operate during daylight hours Monday through Friday. Nearby residents should expect some noise during that time.

"Our goal is to cause as little disturbance as possible for the residents whose homes border the park and for visitors who enjoy using the trail and the park in winter," Morris said.