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OPRD seeks to fill position on grant committee that advises on statewide trails - 10/16/17

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking a representative of the hiking community for a vacant volunteer position on the Recreation Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee that evaluates grants for statewide trails projects.

The competitive grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and administered by OPRD. Grants are awarded to non-profits and governments for trail projects, including building new trails, improving existing trails and installing trail signs.

"Reviewing these grant applications is an important step in the process of improving and expanding Oregon's trail system," said OPRD grant coordinator Jodi Bellefeuille. "Grant committee members get to have a direct say in what trail projects are funded and provide feedback to land managers about their proposals."

The ten member committee evaluates and ranks requests for grant funding. Ideal candidates can live anywhere in Oregon and will be avid hikers with experience in one or more of the following areas: recreation planning, trail design, project management, grant management and budget review.

The committee meets once or twice a year at locations throughout the state. In 2017, meetings were held in Salem in May and September. Dates for 2018 have not been finalized. Time commitment varies and includes reviewing and evaluating 40-80 grant applications each annual funding cycle.

Those interested in serving must submit an OPRD Grant Advisory Committee Appointment Interest Form by Friday, Nov. 17. For more information or to obtain an interest form, visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/RTP-Committee.aspx, or contact Jodi Bellefeuille at jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.

Committee to review Oregon Heritage Grant applications - 10/16/17

A committee will meet to score and rank applications for the Oregon Heritage Grant program. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the Oregon Heritage Commission for final review and approval on November 6 via conference call. The grant committee meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, and can also be accessed by phone. The committee will meet October 30, 9:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1?888?
278?0296, access Code: 4653554.

For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .

Oregon Parks and Recreation Seeks Wolf Creek Inn Operator - 10/11/17

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is extending the deadline to accept proposals to operate Wolf Creek Inn, an historic bed-and-breakfast property near Grants Pass, in southern Oregon. The request for proposals (RFP) opened August 15, 2017 and closes October 19, 2017. More info is here: http://bit.ly/WolfCreekInnRFP

The Inn has been operated in many different ways in its long history. Since 1975, when OPRD took ownership of the 4 1/2 acre property, the facility has functioned as a restaurant, an overnight hotel, or both together. OPRD has run the operation with its own staff, or as an adjunct to a concessionaire. Right now, OPRD is operating the property as a museum and as an overnight hotel. The agency hopes to have a contract awarded later this fall for 2018 operation.

"It is a unique opportunity," said Nathan Seable, who manages state parks in the area, including Wolf Creek Inn State Historic Site. "For the right individuals, this is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to run a business in a great community." Seable will conduct site visits for any interested parties.

Wolf Creek Inn was built sometime around 1883, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The 11,000 sq. ft. facility has been remodeled, and today boasts upgraded HVAC systems and electrical service, an efficient commercial kitchen and modern fire suppression. Its nine guest rooms, appointed in period décor, have seen the likes of Clark Gable and Jack London walk through their doors. The Inn has always been a strong venue for special events, and its restaurant and hospitality services have been regionally famous for decades.

Wolf Creek Inn is located just off the I-5, about 20 miles north of Grants Pass, Oregon. The Inn is an easy drive to the many tourism destinations of southern Oregon, including Crater Lake National Park, the wild and scenic Rogue River, the Oregon Caves, the renowned Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, and the Britt Music Festival in Jacksonville.

OPRD seeks feedback on proposal to add a section of Nehalem River to the State Scenic Waterways Program - 10/10/17

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) has extended the comment period for a study evaluating a 17-mile section of the Nehalem River for possible inclusion in the State Scenic Waterways Program. Comments will be accepted until Nov. 1, 2017.

Feedback will be used to write a report that will either recommend for or against designating a portion of the river as a state scenic waterway.

The Nehalem River study area starts at Henry Rierson Spruce Run Campground and ends at the boundary of Cougar Valley State Park, near Cook Creek Road. A scenic waterway designation would help protect the scenic, natural and recreation value of this section of river by subjecting some activities within 1/4 mile of the bank to a review.

No decisions have been made yet about whether or not to recommend this part of the river as a scenic waterway. As part of the designation process, scenic waterways staff involve the local community, evaluate public support, and objectively study the river to determine if it meets specific criteria.

Comments can be sent to oprd.publiccomment@oregon.gov or to OPRD Scenic Waterway Study, 725 Summer St NE Suite C, Salem, OR 97301. The comment period will close on Nov. 1, 2017.

Comments will help OPRD staff to develop a report that explains whether this waterway would make a good addition to the system. Findings will be included in a report that will go to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission, Water Resources Commission and eventually to the Governor's Office.

More information on the program and a map of the study area, go to oregon.gov/oprd and click on Scenic Waterways (http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/NATRES/scenicwaterways/Pages/index.aspx. A link to a map of the study area can be found under Current Events (http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/NATRES/scenicwaterways/Documents/NehalemProposed_Sept2017.pdf).

For more information contact Alexandra Phillips, Bikeways and Waterways Coordinator, at 503-986-0631 or alex.phillips@oregon.gov.

OPRD invites public to participate in master plan for Smith Rock State Park - 10/10/17

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites the public to weigh in on long-term planning for Smith Rock State Park as part of the process of updating the park's Master Plan. The plan, last updated in 1991, will guide recreation use and resource management for the next 20 years.

OPRD planners invite park users and community members to two public meetings for a presentation of preliminary design concepts for park improvements:

>>Oct. 24 in Bend: 5:30-7:30 p.m., Bend Park & Recreation District, Riverbend Community Room, 799 SW. Columbia St.

>>Oct. 25 in Redmond: 5:30 -- 7:30 p.m., Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, South Sister Main Hall, 3800 SE. Airport Way.

Park planners will present three alternatives that reflect site preservation priorities, capacity constraints, parking, trail and facility improvements and improvements to other park amenities. These alternatives are based on feedback collected from stakeholders and at the first round of public meetings in January.

A description of the planning process is at smithrockparkplan.com. Those unable to attend one of the meetings may submit comments on this website or by email to OPRD Planner Julia Cogger at julia.cogger@oregon.gov; by phone at 503-986-0663; or by mail sent to Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, 725 Summer St. NE., Suite C, Salem, OR 97301.

Planners will incorporate comments into a draft master plan, to be presented at public meetings in early 2018. Deadline for comments is Nov. 25, 2017.

Historic Assessment Review Committee to meet October 17th in Salem - 10/10/17

The Historic Assessment Review Committee will meet at 9:00 am on October 17 at the North Mall Office Building located at 725 Summer Street NE, Room 124A, Salem. Agenda items will include overview and highlights of the 2017 Special Assessment Property Tax benefit period, passing of bylaws, election of co-chair, and discussion on the future of the program which sunsets in 2020. The committee will invite public comments.

State law established the five-member Historic Assessment Review Committee to be the review body for appeals from property owners participating in the Special Assessment Property Tax Program for Historic Properties.

Requests for information about the meeting and accessibility may be made to coordinator Joy Sears at 503-986-0688 or by e-mail: Joy.Sears@oregon.gov.

Attached Media Files: Press Release
Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation meets in Salem - 10/10/17

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) will consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places in a one-day meeting on October 20 at the North Mall Office Building located at 725 Summer Street NE in Salem. The committee will be taking tours of recent historic preservation projects in Salem during the morning, and these are open to the public. Tours will include the Oregon Supreme Court Building (1163 State Street NE) at 9:00 AM, the Salem Train Station Baggage Depot (500 13th Street NE) at 10:00 AM, and the Roth-McGilchrist Building (102-110 Liberty Street NE) at 11:00 AM. State Historic Preservation Staff presentations will be made at 12:00 PM, and nomination hearings will begin at 2:30 PM in the North Mall Office Building in conference rooms 124 A and B.

The committee will review proposed nominations for the Spring Valley School in northeast Polk County, and for the Central Oregon Canal Historic District, in Deschutes County, near Bend. A meeting agenda is available at http:www.oregonheritage.org/OPRD/HCD/NATREG/nrhp_sachphome.shtml.

Nominations recommended by the SACHP go to the National Park Service, which maintains the Register under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. Members of the committee hold credentials in many historic preservation-related fields.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting may be made by calling (503) 986-0690. More information about the National Register and Oregon properties listed in the National Register is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Attached Media Files: Press Release
New Oregon State Park camping rates go into effect Nov. 1, 2017 - 10/09/17

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // September 27, 2017

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Cell: 503-931-2590

Salem OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is raising state park camping rates by $2 for some types of campsites effective Nov. 1, 2017.

The Oregon Legislature approved the $2 increase as part of the 2017-19 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department budget. After a public comment period in August and September, the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission approved the rate increase at its September 2017 meeting.

The rate for a typical full hookup RV site at the state's most popular campgrounds will rise to $30 per night, and basic yurts will go from $40 to $42. Rates will also rise by the same $2 amount for deluxe yurts, basic and deluxe cabins, electric sites, and hiker-biker camping areas. Tent camping rates, currently $17-$19 per night, will not change. Additional information is available at http://bit.ly/OregonStateParksrates.

"The $2 rate increase aligns with the views expressed in past park surveys that show visitors prefer smaller rate increases on a more frequent basis than a large fee increase in the future," says Lisa Sumption, director of OPRD. "We do not receive tax dollars for operation of our parks. Nearly all our funding comes from visitors, a portion of RV registration dollars, and the Oregon Lottery."

Oregon's state parks attract 2.7 million campers and 51.5 million day visitors every year, consistently ranking in the nation's top 10 state park systems. OPRD last raised its camping rates in 2014, and the state park system is not funded by taxes. Visitors, voter-approved funding from the Oregon Lottery, and a share of recreational vehicle registrations fund the Oregon state park system.

Visit www.oregonstateparks.org for a list of all state parks and campgrounds.

The Dalles Main Street Receives Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. The Dalles Main Street won the award for Best Retail Event.

The Dalles Main Street created a "shop downtown promotion" as a way to generate foot traffic, in conjunction with The Dalles Civic Auditorium seventh annual BeerFest. Participants were encouraged to spend ten dollars at a downtown business the day before and the day of the BeerFest to have their admission fee to the BeerFest waived. The promotion was advertised on social media and through the use of printed materials displayed in downtown. The Dalles Main Street was able to track their results by interviewing attendees at the admission booth and concluded that a total of 84 participants visited 33 unique businesses in the downtown and spent a total of $6,340.00. Most of the participants heard about the promotion through word of mouth or on social media. Businesses in the downtown were thrilled to participate because the promotion benefitted them at no cost.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Bandon's Gorse Blossom Festival.
Bandon's Gorse Blossom Festival.
Two South Coast Towns Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts (Photo) - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. A project in Bandon and a project in Port Orford were recognized at the event.

Bandon's Gorse Blossom Festival won the award for Best Downtown Special Event. The inaugural Gorse Blossom Festival was organized by the Greater Bandon Association and made its debut in Bandon last February, bringing seafood, beer, and wine as a 3-day weekend festival. The festival also was an opportunity to learn about their local nemesis, the prickly-gorse plant brought to the area in the early 1900's. Over 800 people packed into the waterfront fisheries building, along with 40 vendors some who joined in the gorse fun and served gorse cider, wine, cocktails, and cheesecake. Local gorse fighters, the Gorse Action Group and the Go Native! Project were on hand to educate visitors about this invasive species. The festival ended early each evening so visitors could participate in merchant focused activities including a Presidential Pub Crawl, music and fire dancing, and a Sunday morning Bloody Mary Stroll through Old Town. The event was a huge boost to the local economy with some merchants reporting they had their biggest weekend all year.

Port Orford's Whimsical Fire Hydrants art project won Honorable Mention for Best Image Campaign. Port Orford Main Street Revitalization Association's purpose for this project was to turn Port Orford's rusting fire hydrants into pieces of art as part of POMSRA's efforts to brand the Port Orford Business District as an Arts and Cultural District. Individuals from the organization plus a number business owners adopted a hydrant for the project. Other goals included: making a more walkable experience and helping businesses, creating promotional materials including a walking map, placemats with before and after pictures, and promoting relationships with the community. As part of the project, two contests were held. More than a hundred citizens voted for the best hydrant and 59 children participated in a coloring contest.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Attached Media Files: Bandon's Gorse Blossom Festival.
Best New Business Winner Grano Bakery
Best New Business Winner Grano Bakery
Oregon City Receives Three Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts (Photo) - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. Three projects in Oregon City received awards.

Oregon City's Grano Bakery and Market, neighborhood bakery that focuses on whole grains and sourdough bread, won the award for Best New Business. Husband and wife team, Ulises Alvarez and Ava Mikolavich, opened Grano in February 2017.

Downtown Oregon City Association won the following awards:
* Best of Oregon City(TM) event wins Best Image Campaign award. Best of Oregon City(TM) is a Peoples' Choice promotion that honors Oregon City's favorite businesses, places, experiences, and people. 62 nominees received awards at a June red carpet ceremony in five overall categories. Best of Oregon City(TM) was spearheaded and underwritten by Downtown Oregon City Association in partnership with the Oregon City Chamber of Commerce.

* First City Celebration and Oregon Trail Brewfest won the Outstanding Fundraiser award. First City Celebration and the Oregon Trail Brewfest are concurrent events that benefit from shared infrastructure and marketing. Income from the fundraiser supports the downtown revitalization efforts of the Downtown Oregon City Association.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Mike Ragsdale.
Mike Ragsdale.
Newberg Downtown Coalition's Mike Ragsdale Receives Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for Main Street Manager of the Year (Photo) - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. Newberg Downtown Coalition's Mike Ragsdale received the award for Main Street Manager of the Year.

Mike Ragsdale is the Executive Director of the Newberg Downtown Coaltion. Under his leadership, the Newberg Downtown Coalition:

* Reduced vacancies in downtown by improving how prospective tenants saw Newberg by creating partnerships for a wine barrel planter project, organizing cleanup days, encouraging tenants to tend the fronts of their buildings, and securing façade and building improvement grants.
* Acquired a Transportation Growth Management grant to engage the community in visioning the transformation that would take place in downtown Newberg when the bypass is completed.
* Secured annual sponsorships ranging from $5k to $25K as NDC works to build a reliable financial base for their Main Street program.

He has spent much of his professional life in commercial real estate, served in the Oregon State legislature, was the presiding officer of the Metro Council, advocated for the Newberg-Dundee Bypass for two decades, serves on the boards of the Newberg Cultural Center and Chehalem Park and Recreation District, and is an active member of Newberg Rotary. These threads of experience have been invaluable to the Newberg Main Street program. His constant presence downtown and his ability to engage community members in the downtown revitalization efforts has helped him be successful at accomplishing Newberg Downtown Coalition's goals and objectives.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Attached Media Files: Mike Ragsdale.
Stayton's Deidrich Building after renovation work in completed.
Stayton's Deidrich Building after renovation work in completed.
Three Mid-Willamette Valley Towns Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts (Photo) - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. Two projects in Albany, one project in Stayton, and a project in Lebanon were recognized at the event.

Albany's Historic Albany Carousel won the award for Outstanding Special Project. This project is the result of more than ten years and over 150,000 hours of volunteer effort. In 2002, Wendy Kirby, brought the idea of a carousel to Albany after seeing a similar project in Missoula Montana. The Albany Downtown Association (ADA) helped set up the first organizational meetings. The Albany Historic Carousel Project (AHCP) formed and started by opening a carving and painting studio and and started the process of getting animals adopted, carved, and painted. Ten year later and the new $6 million Historic Albany Carousel building opened this year on August 15. Funding was primarily through sponsorships of the decorative elements of the carousel itself as well as donations, grants, and other fund raising efforts including a forgivable loan from the Central Albany Revitalization Area urban renewal program for the purchase of the land on which the carousel building sits as well as for architectural fees.

Albany's Pix Theatre won the much coveted award for Business of the Year. Owners Rod and Denise Bigner bought the Pix in July 2013 becoming the third owners. They have done work on the interior giving it a retro vibe and have also done exterior renovations including repairing the iconic neon Pix sign. Rod & Denise support the community from helping with events like Movies on Monteith to supporting local schools through fundraising opportunities. They have a great cross promotion w/ a local restaurant on date night packages, and participate in Shop Small Saturday.

Stayton's Deidrich Building won the award for Best Façade over $7500. The Deidrich Building is one of the most significant buildings in downtown Stayton. The project included complete restoration of the front and side of the building and was funded by a $20,000 Diamonds in the Rough grant which was matched by over $37,000 in work and materials. All work and materials met the Secretary of Interior's standards for treatment of historic properties.

Lebanon's Strawberry Plaza Revitalization won the award for Best Downtown Public Improvement. The Strawberry Plaza Revitalization project converted a dilapidated downtown park into a centerpiece for the City of Lebanon. Previously, the site was a magnet for drug activity and certainly not attractive to downtown shoppers and visitors. The Revitalization project established a far more attractive and family-friendly public place, providing space for outdoor art, music, historical information, and to the delight of children of all ages, a strawberry-shaped water fountain. In addition to the visual improvements, the Plaza will become the focal point of downtown events. The total cost of improvements was approximately $346,000.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Tyson Brooks with La Grande Main Street Downtown Receives Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award as Volunteer of the Year - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. La Grande Main Street Downtown's Tyson Brooks was honored with the Volunteer of the Year award.

Brooks began working with La Grande main Street Downtown in 2012 as a volunteer on one of the organization's committee. In addition to volunteering on committees, Brooks does not shy away from helping with event organization, set-up, clean-up and has become La Grande Main Street Downtown's right-hand man. In addition to helping with event logistics, Brooks has also been instrumental in engaging his employer, Frontier Communications, with Main Street efforts in downtown La Grande.

"Volunteers are the backbone of our main street programs," says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "Since 2010, our top two tier level communities have had 175,965 hours of volunteer time dedicated to downtown revitalization efforts. We applaud all the volunteers but especially congratulate Tyson Brooks this year. The awards committee was especially impressed with the variety of ways Tyson has assisted the Main Street efforts.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

After renovation work is complete.
After renovation work is complete.
Hillsboro's Insomnia Coffee Company Receives Award for Downtown Revitalization Efforts (Photo) - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. Hillsboro's Insomnia Coffee Company received the award for Outstanding Interior Renovation.

The largest vacancy in Downtown Hillsboro sat for 5 years, awaiting a savvy business to occupy it. Previously, the 8,000 square foot space was used as a medical facilities store until Insomnia Coffee Company and Dapper and Wise Roasting leased the building with first right of refusal. The entire interior was done to fit the brand of Insomnia, including tiling, new floors, walls, ceilings, and decoration. The back end of the shop holds their roasting facility, and they've created a space in the middle that houses their staff offices. In addition, they've built a state of the art conference room, bringing clientele to Downtown from companies like Nike and Intel. It has become one of Downtown Hillsboro's biggest draws and one of the most used third places.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Birdcage Sculpture in Baker City.
Birdcage Sculpture in Baker City.
Baker City Receives Three Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts (Photo) - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. Baker City was honored with four awards.

The Birdcage, an art piece placed in Downtown Baker City, won the award for Best Placemaking Project. Local artist, tom novak, designed it and local businesses, Baker Welding and Natural Structures, helped fabricate and finish the cage. This piece is one of kind and has started the conversation among other store owners to look at providing something interactive and fun for visitors and locals.

The Mann Block won the award for Outstanding Upper Floor Renovation. Robert Anders gave new life to the second floor of an historic building in downtown Baker City. The project included an interior staircase so that access wasn't through the neighbors exterior entrance, ceiling insulation covered with corrugated metal, restored windows with the original moldings, interior walls, paint, new plumbing, heat and electrical.

Baker Technical Institute (BTI) won the award for Outstanding Partnership. BTI's Natural Resource Brownfield Program has become the local champion through student led projects for identifying Brownfield sites and recognizing the economic need to turn them into viable pieces of real estate. The students shared their survey and assessment results with Baker City Downtown, the Baker County Economic Development Council, and City officials.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Attached Media Files: Birdcage Sculpture in Baker City.
Astoria Station after the improvements.
Astoria Station after the improvements.
Astoria Receives Two Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts (Photo) - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon. Two Astoria projects were recognized at the event.

Astoria Vintage Hardware, an upcycled furniture and décor shop in downtown Astoria, won the award for Best Façade Under $7500. Owner Becky Johnson improved the façade of her business with a new paint scheme, new art deco signage, and refurbished windows. The work done on this building encouraged the owners of a building down the block to apply for and receive the Main Street Building Revitalization Grant to complete the block.

Astoria Station won the award for Outstanding Adaptive Reuse. Taking a former auto service station and most recently an indoor hydroponic gardening supplier, owner Warren Williams created a space for a brewery, cider works, barbershop, and food trucks.

Projects in eleven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. "The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

State Recognizes Nineteen Individuals & Projects for Excellence in Downtown Revitalization - 10/05/17

Oregon Main Street announced its 2017 "Excellence in Downtown Revitalization" award winners last night at the Evening of Excellence Celebration in Oregon City, Oregon.

The nineteen projects, businesses, & individuals honored are:

Best Façade Under $7500 - Astoria Vintage Hardware, Astoria
Best Façade Over $7500 - The Deidrich Building, Stayton
Outstanding Interior Renovation - Insomnia Coffee Company, Hillsboro
Outstanding Special Project - Historic Albany Carousel, Albany
Best Placemaking Project - The Birdcage, Baker City
Best Downtown Public Improvement - Strawberry Plaza Revitalization, Lebanon
Outstanding Upper Floor Renovation - The Mann Block, Baker City
Outstanding Adaptive Reuse - Astoria Station, Astoria
Business of the Year - The Pix Theatre, Albany
Best New Business - Grano Bakery & Market, Oregon City
Best Image Campaign - Best of Oregon City, Oregon City
Best Image Campaign Honorable Mention - Port Orford Fire Hydrants, Port Orford
Best Retail Event - BeerFest Downtown Promotion, The Dalles
Best Downtown Special Event - Gorse Blossom Festival, Bandon
Outstanding Fundraiser - First City Celebration & Oregon Trail Brew Fest, Oregon City
Outstanding Partnership - BTI-Natural Resource, Baker City
Volunteer of the Year - Tyson Brooks, La Grande
Main Street Manager of the Year - Mike Ragsdale, Newberg
Main Street Hero - Mary Oberst & Barbara Sidway

"The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state," said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. "It is simply amazing to see the people and partnerships that develop focused on enhancing the vitality of the historic core of their communities and the projects they implement primarily through volunteer efforts."

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach(R) to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2016, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels -- the top two tiers -- have seen $75,740,994 in private building improvement projects, $91,222,600 in public projects, 1,082 private rehab projects, 561 net new businesses, 121 business expansions, and 2,699 net new jobs. In addition, close to 176,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Medford, Pendleton and Portland residents appointed to Oregon historic cemeteries commission - 10/03/17

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director Lisa Sumption has appointed three members to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries.

Bev Power, who earlier filled a vacated term, was appointed for her first full term. Ms. Power currently manages the IOOF Eastwood Cemetery owned by the City of Medford. She has interest and knowledge in electronic mapping and technology to assist in day-to-day management of cemeteries, and has been an active member contributing several resources developed by the commission.

Milo Reed is a Portland based freelance historian who also works for the Multnomah County Library at the Rockwood Branch. He is the former Vanport Mosaic Historian in Residence and serves on the board of Oregon Black Pioneers.

Sarah Silbernagel works as an archaeologist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Pendleton, Oregon, covering nine counties in Eastern Oregon. Her love for historic cemeteries and the preservation of the past has been instilled since childhood.

"I am happy to have these three on the commission," stated Kuri Gill, coordinator for the state historic cemeteries program. "Together they bring a combination of skills and passion that will benefit our work to expand the stories of Oregon's historic cemeteries and provide tools to preserve them."

The seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries supports OPRD historic cemetery preservation efforts by offering training, educational resources, coordination and grants. Its other members are Diane Elder of Paisley, Mike Leamy of Astoria and Charlotte Lehan of Wilsonville, Mark Petrie of North Bend, and Bev Power of Medford.

For more information about the commission and the historic cemeteries program visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Historic Cemeteries Program Coordinator, Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or (503) 986-0685.

Heritage Commission to meet October 22-23 in Enterprise - 10/03/17

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Enterprise October 22-23.

On October 22, Commissioners will gather at 12:30 p.m. to tour heritage efforts Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center and the Wallowa Band Nez Perce Trail Interpretive Center.

On October 23, a public business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Prairie Creek Center, 104 Licht Street, Enterprise. Its agenda includes review and decision on a proposed statewide celebration declaration for the 175th anniversary of the Oregon Trail migration, Oregon Heritage Tradition designation proposal, Oregon Heritage Conference 2018 in Bend, a statewide digitization initiative, and technical outreach services.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

For more information and accessibility needs, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Interim Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department now taking sealed bids to sell unused parcel near Monroe - 09/27/17

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // September 27, 2017

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Desk: 503-986-0722 // Cell: 503-931-2590

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department now taking sealed bids to sell unused parcel near Monroe

Salem OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is now taking sealed bids from any party interested in purchasing an undeveloped approximately 38-acre property near the Benton-Lane County border. Sealed bids are due no later than October 17, 2017.

The property on 99W was formerly used as a highway wayside, but the restroom and sewage systems failed ten years ago and the facilities were removed. The property has been considered a candidate for disposal since 2014, and department property staff have been preparing it for sale in recent six months. An appraisal places the market value at $356,000. As required by state law, the property was first offered to other public agencies before being considered for public sale, but there were no takers.

If successful, funds from the sale will be placed in a special account used for property transactions that improve the overall state park system. The state park system both acquires and transfers properties out on a fairly regular basis as a way to improve outdoor recreation, protect key natural resources, and preserve important historic sites. The parcel offered for sale was originally acquired in 1926.

More information on the sale and a bid form is available online at http://bit.ly/WashburneWSpropertysale, or from Kammie Bunes, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Right of Way Agent, at 503-986-0630 (kammie.bunes@oregon.gov).

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OPRD seeks to fill two ATV Advisory Committee positions - 09/27/17

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is recruiting volunteers for two positions within the All-Terrain Vehicle Advisory Committee (ATV-AC). These successful candidates will also serve on the ATV Grant Subcommittee.

Current vacancies include active representatives within the following disciplines:
> Class II ATV Representative (Sand rails and four wheel drive vehicles, such as Jeeps, trucks and SUVs)
> Class III ATV Representative (Off-road motorcycles)

The Oregon Legislature established the ATV Advisory Committee in 2010 and tasked it with the following duties: reviewing accidents and fatalities resulting from ATV recreation; reviewing changes to statutory vehicle classifications as necessary for safety considerations; reviewing safety features of all classes of Off-Highway Vehicles (OHVs) and recommending appropriate safety requirements to protect child operators and riders of OHVs.

The successful candidate will also serve on the ATV Grant Committee, which is responsible for reviewing and recommending funding of grants in support of ATV recreational activities statewide. Grant projects include operations and maintenance; law enforcement; emergency medical services; land acquisition; and planning and development. Approximately 60 applications need to be reviewed every other year. Computer access and experience is mandatory. Knowledge of OHV riding areas throughout Oregon is beneficial.

The ATV Advisory Committee meets as needed up to four times per year at locations throughout the state to advise OPRD regarding ATV issues relating to safety and vehicle classifications. The ATV Grant Subcommittee also meets as needed up to four times per year at locations throughout the state, including field trips.

The Committee Interest Form is available through a link under ATV Committees within the menu section located online at oregonohv.org. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Nov. 3, 2017.

For more information, contact Jeff Trejo at jeff.trejo@oregon.gov or 503-986-0585.

OPRD seeks to fill three ATV Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee positions - 09/27/17

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking volunteers to fill three positions within the new All-Terrain Vehicle Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee. The successful candidates will serve on a committee alongside representatives from other government agencies.

New committee positions include the following:
* All-Terrain Vehicle users (two positions available)
* Member of the public

The Oregon Legislature established the All-Terrain Vehicle Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee in 2017 under Senate Bill 344 and tasked it with accepting, evaluating and conducting field reviews of proposed ATV highway access routes on portions of state highway rights of way.

These members along with other committee members will consult with road authorities, law enforcement and other government agencies.

The ATV Highway Access Route Advisory Committee will meet as needed at locations throughout the state to review, evaluate, advise and report on proposed access routes on portions of affected state highways.

The Committee Interest Form is available through a link under ATV Committees within the menu section located online at oregonohv.org. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Nov. 3, 2017.

For more information, contact Jeff Trejo at jeff.trejo@oregon.gov or 503-986-0585.

Historic Cemeteries Commission meets October 13 in Moro - 09/26/17

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet at 1 p.m. October 13 at the OSU Sherman County Extension Office, 66365 Lonerock Road, Moro. Agenda items will include cemetery ownership, statewide cemetery clean-up days, grant projects, current projects and upcoming plans. The commission will also discuss draft administrative rules for the implementation of recent legislation. This legislation created a program to provide permits to organizations that want to maintain and preserve abandoned cemeteries. The commission will invite public comments. The meeting will also be accessible online. For information on the meeting and to see the draft rule, visit the historic cemeteries page of www.oregonheritage.org.

State law established the seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances.

Requests for information about the meeting and accessibility may be made to and comments on the draft rule language coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

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15th annual archaeology series slated for Smith Rock State Park - 09/25/17

Terrebonne, OR--Smith Rock State Park will host its 15th annual Oregon Archaeology Celebration (OAC) lecture series in October. The Friday evening presentations will all take place at the Smith Rock State Park Welcome Center, 10087 NE Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne. The free talks are open to the public. Day-use parking is $5. Annual parking passes for 12- or 24-months are available.

"We are very pleased with the success and longevity of this annual event," said Paul Patton, Mountain Region resource specialist for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department(OPRD). "Smith Rock's OAC presentation series is dynamic and relevant to the advances in cultural knowledge and scientific techniques being made throughout the field of anthropology. Bringing this information to the public's awareness in an enjoyable and accessible forum is our primary goal."

Presentations

October 6: David L. Minick and David A. Kaiser of the Oregon Archaeological Society present--"A Tale of Two Sites: A Comparison of Two Columbia River Rock Art Locations"

October 13: Rory Becker, associate professor of anthropology from Eastern Oregon University presents--"Seeing Beneath the Soil: Remote Sensing Techniques in Archaeology"

October 20: Erin Woodard, Bureau of Land Management staff archaeologist of the Prineville District presents--"Challenges and Solutions to Preserving Rock Art in Central Oregon"

October 27: Wilson Wewa, Northern Paiute historian and Warm Springs Tribal member presents--"Archaeological Preservation Issues Along the Owyhee River"

The OAC program was established in 1993 when Gov. Barbara Roberts made a proclamation that set aside one month each year to celebrate and promote Oregon's archaeology, cultural heritage, and history.

Smith Rock State Park is located off U.S. 97 three miles north of Redmond and three miles east of Terrebonne. More information and directions are available at www.oregonstateparks.org or by calling 541-923-7551, ext. 21.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department opens four Columbia River Gorge state parks - 09/25/17

Several state parks remain closed

Corbett, OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department has re-opened Dabney State Recreation Area, Portland Women's Forum State Scenic Viewpoint, Rooster Rock State Park and Starvation Creek State Park. The parks were closed as a safety precaution during the Eagle Creek Fire and the related closure of Interstate 84.

All state park major and historic structures withstood the fire according to Park Manager Clay Courtright, West Gorge Management Unit.

"We're grateful that Vista House still stands as well as other iconic features well-loved by Oregonians and visitors to our state," said Courtright.

Several parks remain closed until the all-clear signal is issued for staff to safely access and enter the properties, he added. Park staff will assess possible fire damage to trails, vegetation, parking areas and minor structures. This initial review will take time and the following parks will remain closed until they are safe for visitors. The opening dates will be determined later.

* Ainsworth State Park and campground
* Benson State Recreation Area
* Bridal Veil Falls State Scenic Viewpoint
* Crown Point State Scenic Corridor
* Dalton Point State Recreation Site
* George W. Joseph State Natural Area
* John B. Yeon State Scenic Corridor
* Guy W. Talbot State Park
* Shepperd's Dell State Natural Area
* Viento State Park
* West Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail

Visit www.oregonstateparks.org for the latest park opening information.

Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) to host annual Salmonberry Coalition Meeting Oct. 3 - 09/22/17

Tillamook, OR -- The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency will host their annual combined Coalition meeting on Oct. 3, 2017. The meeting will be from 3 -- 6 p.m. at the Officer's Mess Hall at the Port of Tillamook Bay, 6825 Officer's Row.

The meeting will begin with a presentation on the recently completed Salmonberry Trail Brownfields Study for Tillamook County. Understanding the environmental conditions and risk, and developing cleanup strategies for the rail corridor are important steps in the development of the Salmonberry Trail. The agenda also includes status updates of the current Valley Segment Master Plan Study and the new Strategic Marketing Plan. The presentations will be followed by a STIA business meeting.

The Salmonberry Coalition, formed during the development of a feasibility study and conceptual plan, is a stakeholder group consisting of public and private partners focused on making the Salmonberry Trail a reality. The Salmonberry Trail will connect eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the rugged Oregon Coast Range. The route follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway, which closed in 2007 after experiencing catastrophic storm damage.

The STIA, an outgrowth of the Salmonberry Coalition, was established as the governance structure to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in planning, development and maintenance of the proposed multi-use trail.

For more information, contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail Project Manager at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov.