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Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal
Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal
Cleanup finished on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast (Photo) - 05/17/19

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // May 17, 2019

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director’s Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // Cell: 503-931-2590

Cleanup finished on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast

Bandon, Ore. Friday, May 17, 2019 – Crews finished cleanup of major debris left by the wreck of the Ann Kathleen, a 64-foot fishing vessel. The boat came ashore Thursday, May 2 on a beach south of Bandon, Oregon after catching fire. No one was injured. The vast majority of the wreckage was removed by helicopter over the last week. A portion of the heavy keel was left to sink into the sand.

The cleanup was organized by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and funded by the boat’s insurer. It involved excavators, helicopters, a salvage crew from Global Dive and Salvage, Inc. out of Seattle, with monitoring and support from the Coquille Indian Tribe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The wreck site is several miles from a developed beach access and home to sensitive resources like the western snowy plover, a threatened shorebird in the middle of its nesting season.

The initial cleanup response, led by a unified command that included the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Coast Guard, began May 3 and recovered more than 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel. Some residual fuel was recovered during final demolition. No hazardous fluids from the shipwreck were detected on the beach or in the ocean.

Bait fish were removed from the wreck and temporarily buried in containers at the site for later removal from the beach; burying and removing the bait is necessary to avoid attracting predators to the nesting area. After excavating sand from around the boat, a helicopter carried a dozen loads of heavy debris to the Cape Blanco Airport eight miles south. Smaller, lighter debris was removed using ATVs. The keel was deemed too heavy to fly out. The crews excavated around it and allowed it to sink naturally into the sand, where it now rests several feet beneath the surface. The keel does not contain hazardous material. Staff monitoring the cleanup reported plovers were not disturbed by the work.

More information on sharing the beach with plovers is online at http://bit.ly/wsplover.

# # #

Photos are available online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=17nMl8PqSYOvoQ3-6eRuIFRtJabN7igss

Wallowa Lake State Park
Wallowa Lake State Park
Celebrate State Parks Day June 1 with free camping, parking and special events (Photo) - 05/17/19

Saturday June 1 is State Parks Day and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors for a day of free camping, free parking and special events at Oregon’s state parks.

Several state parks are holding free events that day, and camping is free at all tent, RV and individual horse campsites. Day-use parking will be free June 1 and 2 at the 25 parks that charge a day-use fee.

“State Parks Day is our way each year of thanking Oregonians for their commitment to our state parks,” said Lisa Sumption, OPRD director. “We invite people to discover a new park or revisit an old favorite.”

State Parks Day is organized by OPRD and has been held annually since 1997.

Oregon Lottery returns as an event sponsor this year and they’re providing support for events at six state parks: Champoeg State Heritage Area, Fort Stevens State Park, Tumalo State Park, The Cove Palisades State Park, Wallowa Lake State Park and Silver Falls State Park.

Oregon Lottery is also sponsoring a new addition to State Parks Day: commemorative State Parks Day pins. The limited-edition pins will be available for free at more than two dozen state parks on June 1. See the full list of parks distributing the pins at the end of this release. Note: parks have a limited supply of pins and they will be given away first come, first served.

In total, 11 state parks will host free events June 1:

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park

Coast

  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Portland Metro Area

  • Tryon Creek State Natural Area

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Collier Memorial State Park
  • Wallowa Lake State Park

Events include disc golf, living history, outdoor concerts, ranger-led programs and more. Full details about events at each park are on the official State Parks Day webpage

To guarantee a campsite for State Parks Day, reserve online at oregonstateparks.org or call (800) 452-5687 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. While campsite rental is free, an $8 non-refundable transaction fee is required at the time of the reservation. Reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance of your stay. Approximately half of state park campgrounds accept reservations.

List of state parks giving away State Parks Day pins on June 1

Coast

  • Bullards Beach State Park
  • Cape Arago State Park
  • Cape Lookout State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint
  • Crissey Field State Recreation Site
  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Humbug Mountain State Park
  • Shore Acres State Park
  • Sunset Bay State Park
  • William M. Tugman State Park

Columbia River Gorge

  • Ainsworth State Park
  • Guy W. Talbot State Park

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Dexter State Recreation Area
  • Elijah Bristow State Park
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park
  • Thompson's Mills State Heritage Area

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • LaPine State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Clyde Holliday State Park
  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area
  • Farewell Bend State Recreation Area
  • Hat Rock State Park
  • Lake Owyhee State Park
  • Minam State Recreation Area
  • Sumpter Valley Dredge State Heritage Site
  • Wallowa Lake State Park

Logo RGB horizontal
Logo RGB horizontal
Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors holds inaugural meeting May 22 at Silver Falls (Photo) - 05/15/19

SALEM, Ore. – Gov. Kate Brown has established a task force to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in the state. Task force members were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. 

Task force members will work over the next year to produce a report recommending policies, legislation and initiatives to support economic development in both rural and urban areas, balance improved outdoor recreation access with resource protection, and increase outdoor recreation participation, especially among youth and traditionally underserved communities.

The governor tapped the Office of Outdoor Recreation, established in 2017 within the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), to guide the task force.

The task force will meet for the first time 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. May 22 at the Silver Falls Conference Center, Silver Falls State Park, 20024 Silver Falls Highway SE, Sublimity. The meeting is open to the public.

The meeting will encompass the current state of affairs, including past and ongoing efforts to improve outdoor recreation and business opportunities. View the full meeting agenda online: oregon.gov/orec/Documents/052019ORECTaskForceMeeting.pdf

The meeting is the first in a planned series; the group will hold subsequent meetings on the coast, the Portland area, and in southern and eastern Oregon.

The task force is composed of private and public sector representatives and will be chaired by Commissioner Jon Blasher of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, Director of the Office of Outdoor Recreation, will manage the task force. A full list of task force members is included at the end of this release. More detail about each member is online: oregon.gov/orec/Pages/Governors-Task-Force.aspx.

Building on and uniting other statewide outdoor recreation efforts, the task force will deliver its final report in April 2020 on recommendations for legislation, investment of existing public and private resources, future funding, and high-level management strategies. Top recommendations will be presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Carrie Lovellette, OPRD executive assistant, at 503-986-0733 or rie.Lovellette@oregon.gov">Carrie.Lovellette@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.

More information about Silver Falls State Park, including maps and driving directions, is on the park’s webpage.

Task force members

  • Jonathan Blasher (Chair), Director - Parks and Nature, Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission
  • Asha Aiello, Communications Director; Secretary/Treasurer, American Forest Resource Council; Oregon Outdoor Council
  • Kelley Minty Morris, Klamath County Commissioner, Association of Oregon Counties; Klamath County
  • Chris Hager, NW Regional Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers
  • Amanda Welker, Global Trade & Recruitment Manager, Business Oregon
  • Queta Gonzalez, Director, Center for Diversity and the Environment
  • Esmeralda Horn, Development & Recreation Manager, City of Umatilla
  • Chuck Sams, Communications Director, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
  • Ed Morgan, General Manager, Guaranty RV, Inc.
  • Mike Wallenfells, VP Sales; President, Hydro Flask; Oregon Outdoor Alliance
  • Matthew Drake, CEO, Mount Hood Meadows
  • Jennifer Magby, Interim Tillamook District Recreation Manager, Oregon Department of Forestry
  • Roger Fuhrman, Information and Education Division Administrator, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
  • Susan Peithman, Active Transportation Policy Lead, Oregon Department of Transportation
  • Lillian Shirley, BSN, MPH, MPA, Director, Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority
  • Mary Jo Evers, CPA, Finance Director; Chairperson, Ontario School District; Ontario Recreation District
  • Chris Havel, Associate Director, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
  • Senator Chuck Thomsen, District 26 (R), Oregon Legislative Assembly
  • Representative Ken Helm, District 34 (D), Oregon Legislative Assembly
  • Matthew Weintraub, Founding Member; Member, Oregon Mountain Biking Coalition; Clatsop County Parks and Recreational Lands Advisory Committee
  • Hugh Morrison, Network Coordinator, Oregon Outdoors
  • Steph Noll, Coalition Director, Oregon Trails Coalition
  • Randy Henry, Boating Safety and Education Manager, Oregon State Marine Board
  • Lindsey Shirley, University Outreach & Engagement Associate Provost, Oregon State University
  • Sue Bal, Business Development Manager, Athletic & Outdoor Industry, Prosper Portland
  • Sara Morrissey, Public Affairs Manager, Strategy, Travel Oregon
  • John Omlin, Owner; Several Statewide ATV Committees, Valley Powersports
  • Dan Little (ex-officio), First Gentleman, State of Oregon
  • Cailin O'Brien-Feeney (ex-officio), Director, Oregon Office of Outdoor Recreation
  • Tracy Tophooven (ex-officio), Director for Recreation, WWSR, Lands, and Minerals, USFS Region 6
  • Aaron Curtis (ex-officio), Section Chief for Social Sciences, Bureau of Land Management OR/WA

# # #

The mission of the Office of Outdoor Recreation is to elevate the personal, community, and economic benefits of outdoor recreation for all Oregonians. The Office of Outdoor Recreation is a resource to businesses and nonprofit organizations, a partner to agencies and communities, and an advocate for the outdoors.

Attached Media Files: Logo RGB horizontal , Logo RGB vertical
2020 Centennial Vote initiative - 05/13/19

The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, which gave women the right to vote in the United States. Oregon Heritage, in partnership with Oregon Women’s History Consortium, encourages organizations across Oregon to begin planning now to engage the public in the 2020 Centennial.

Key opportunities include:

1) Contributing sites to the National Votes for Women Trail.

The National Votes for Women Trail is a project of the National Collaborative for Women’s History Sites that collects sites from all over the country to tell the untold story of suffrage for all women, of all ethnicities that extends well past the passage of the 19th Amendment. All are welcome to research and contribute new sites. More information can be found here: https://ncwhs.org/votes-for-women-trail/get-involved/

2) Documenting historic sites in Oregon connected to women.

Oregon Heritage is collecting information on places associated with women in Oregon history. These may be residences, business places, social gathering spaces, sites for suffrage and women’s rights, burial sites, campuses, and others. The information will be added to the Oregon Historic Sites Database and may be used to designate properties to the National Register of Historic Places in the future. More information can be found here: http://makeoregonhistory.org/

3) Creating exhibits and events that share stories of local suffragettes and women’s history.

Now is the time to start planning community activities for the 2020 Centennial. A guide for identifying women’s history in your community, programming ideas to consider, and funding opportunities can be found at www.oregonheritage.org

The goal for this program is to generate knowledge of women’s history and historic sites in Oregon, share stories of women’s suffrage and women’s history, and commemorate women in Oregon through promotions and social media.

Oregon Heritage is a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department that supports preservation efforts of Oregon’s history, culture, and heritage.  More information can be found at: www.oregonheritage.org or by contacting Beth Dehn at eth.dehn@oregon.gov">beth.dehn@oregon.gov.

The Ann Kathleen showing sand accumlating around the wreck, requiring excavation.
The Ann Kathleen showing sand accumlating around the wreck, requiring excavation.
Cleanup starts on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast (Photo) - 05/10/19

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // May 10, 2019

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director’s Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // Cell: 503-931-2590

Cleanup starts on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast

Bandon, Ore. Friday, May 10, 2019 – Cleanup has begun to remove debris left by the wreck of the Ann Kathleen, a 64-foot fishing vessel. The boat came ashore Thursday, May 2 after catching fire. No one was injured. During cleanup, visitor parking and boat ramp access at Boice-Cope County Park several miles to the south will be restricted.

Several entities responded initially—including the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, U.S. Coast Guard, and a representative of the boat’s private insurer—to remove more than 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel from the craft’s fuel tanks. The current team—OPRD, the insurer, Coquille Indian Tribe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, and Global Dive and Salvage, Inc. out of Seattle—expect to begin removing as much of the ship’s remains as possible over the next several days.

Significant portions of the hull, mast, and mechanical components are on the beach. Sand has already started to accumulate around the wreckage, requiring excavation before the wreck can be cut up and airlifted by helicopter to the Cape Blanco Airport eight miles south. The work is being funded by the ship’s insurer. Some portion of the wreck may be left buried deep on the shore if conditions make removal too difficult.

Staff will be keeping a constant eye on the federally-protected western snowy plover and other sensitive resources as the work progresses. The need to protect active nests and public safety in the area is compelling the rapid response.

The wreck is several miles from a developed beach access and receives few visitors this time of year. Anyone visiting should give the work site a wide berth, watch for vehicles on the beach, and respect the plover nesting area by sticking to the wet sand. More information on plovers is online at https://bit.ly/wsplover.

A small amount of lightweight debris from the wreck has spread several miles south. Beach visitors south of the signed plover nesting area can help by carrying trash bags and gloves on any visit and leaving the beach cleaner than they found it.

# # #

Media advisory: the area is not only very difficult to reach, there are sensitive resources in the area. At this time, we’re requesting no on-site visits from reporters, helicopters, or camera crews.

Photos and previous releases are available online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=17nMl8PqSYOvoQ3-6eRuIFRtJabN7igss

Committee to review historic cemetery grant applications - 05/10/19

On May 23, 2019, the Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grant committee will meet to score and rank the applications for the Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grant program. The recommendations from the committee will be forwarded to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries for final review and approval on June 7, 2019. The meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, room 124B at 9:00 a.m. Interested parties may also call into to listen at 1-877-402-9757, access code 4605348.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .

 

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Committee to review museum grant applications - 05/08/19

On May 22 2018, the Oregon Museum Grant committee will meet to score and rank the applications for the Oregon Museum Grant program. The recommendations from the committee will be forwarded to the Oregon Heritage Commission for final review and approval on June 3, 2017. The meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, room 124A. at 9:00 a.m. Interested parties may also call into to listen at 1-877-402-9757 access code:  4605348.

Brookings-Harbor Azalea Festival designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition - 05/08/19

The Brookings-Harbor Azalea Festival marks its upcoming 80th year with an Oregon Heritage Tradition designation by the Oregon Heritage Commission.

Other Oregon Heritage Traditions include the Oregon State Fair, Medford’s Pear Blossom Festival, the Pendleton Round-Up, and the Woodburn Fiesta Mexicana.

“The designation recognizes those traditions that have helped define the character of the state,” said Todd Kepple, the commission’s chair. “The Azalea Festival celebrates the beauty of Oregon’s south coast.” 

The Azalea Festival began in 1939 when the Chamber of Commerce formed and Azalea Park was dedicated. The story is that Oregon State Parks superintendent Samuel Boardman was to come to Brookings to dedicate the park, so the community decided there should be a big celebration to go with it. The annual Azalea Festival was born. It ran for a few years, until invasion by Japanese forces seemed possible in late 1941. Travel was restricted, and the festival was suspended until World War II came to an end. It started up again after the War and has run every year since.

Today the vision of the Azalea Festival and Parade is to celebrate community and bring everyone together to kick off summer tourist season. An estimated 150+ volunteers put time into the festival, and various civic, cultural, political, and religious groups come together to contribute to the all-volunteer run event. The public can participate in a variety of activities including a parade, art show, antique car show, disc golf tournament, library book sale, veteran memorials, and Rock the Chetco concert.

As the name of the festival indicates, azaleas are a central focus, with an estimated 3,000 azalea plants in the area. Expert gardeners assert that some of the ancient native azaleas, rhododendron occidental, have been alive for 150-400 years.

The Brookings-Harbor Azalea Festival will be held May 24- May 26. More information can be found at: https://brookingsharborchamber.com/

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state. A list of Tradition designations is available at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/pages/oht.aspx .

The Oregon Heritage Commission coordinates efforts to solve statewide heritage issues through grants, education, and advocacy, and also promotes heritage tourism efforts.

Public invited to comment on proposed update to Master Plan for Pilot Butte Scenic Viewpoint May 20 in Bend - 05/07/19

BEND, Ore. – Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will share draft recommendations for updating the Master Plan for Pilot Butte State Scenic Viewpoint 6 - 8 p.m. May 20 at the Pilot Butte Middle School cafeteria, 1501 NE Neff Road, Bend. The meeting is open to the public.

At the meeting, OPRD staff will present an overview of the master plan update process and their draft recommendations for the Pilot Butte Master Plan update. Attending members of the public will have an opportunity to comment on the draft recommendations.  

The draft recommendations are the result of seven months of outreach and planning by OPRD. The agency has incorporated feedback from prior public meetings, online surveys and a stakeholder advisory committee.

“Feedback from our neighbors is an important part of the master plan update process,” said Rachel Hill, OPRD park planner. “We’re excited to share our proposals for Pilot Butte’s future with Bend-area residents and hear their thoughts.” 

Hill says the final draft plan is expected to be completed this fall, when it will be shared with the public and submitted to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission for final approval.

A park master plan guides the development and use of park facilities. It also provides guidelines for the protection and management of important natural, cultural and scenic resources within the park. Master plans are on a 20-year update cycle; the Pilot Butte Master Plan was last updated in 1995.

Learn more about the Master Plan at https://pilotbuttemasterplan.com/.

Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Rachel Hill, park planner, at least three days in advance: 503-947-8616 or achel.Hill@oregon.gov">Rachel.Hill@oregon.gov.

Heritage Commission seeks to fill current & future vacancies - 05/06/19

There are currently two appointed positions on the Oregon Heritage Commission that have expired, or will be expiring June 30. Requests for appointment are now being accepted.

The Heritage Commission’s nine members represent a diversity of cultural, geographic and institutional interests. The Commission is the primary agency for coordination of heritage activities in the state. This includes carrying out the Oregon Heritage Plan, increasing efficiency and avoiding duplication among interest groups, developing plans for coordination among agencies and organizations, encouraging tourism related to heritage resources, and coordinating statewide anniversary celebrations.

All Oregon residents are encouraged to apply for appointment. The Heritage Commission is especially seeking members with knowledge and experience related to community institutions, heritage tourism, and education/higher education. It also particularly seeks members who have experience working with diverse cultural groups and/or who live in the eastern Oregon.

The group meets four-six times per year in changing locations around the state, including by phone. Commissioners are also asked to occasionally participate in meetings or events in their regions and work on other projects outside of meeting time. Commissioners are reimbursed for their travel and related expenses while conducting official commission business.

More information about the Oregon Heritage Commission is available online at www.oregonheritage.org and from Commission coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.dehn@oregon.gov">beth.dehn@oregon.gov

To request appointment, go to Gov. Kate Brown’s Boards and Commissions webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/gov/admin/Pages/Boards-and-Commissions.aspx .  For full consideration for the one current vacancy, please submit your request by June 10.

Ann Kathleen shipwreck current
Ann Kathleen shipwreck current
Small shipwreck ashore on south Oregon coast drawing response from state and federal agencies (Photo) - 05/03/19

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // May 3, 2019

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director’s Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // Cell: 503-931-2590

Small shipwreck ashore on south Oregon coast drawing response from state and federal agencies

Bandon OR -- A 64-foot wood and fiberglass fishing vessel, the Ann Kathleen out of Westport, Washington, caught fire while at sea Thursday, May 2, off the southern Oregon coast south of Bandon. The crew abandoned the vessel and were eventually rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard. No injuries were reported. The boat came aground in a remote area of beach north of Floras Lake at low tide late Thursday.

Debris from the boat, which is no longer actively burning, is resting on the beach as of Friday morning, May 3. A team from the U.S. Coast Guard, local fire department, and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality will evaluate the site for toxic materials and develop any necessary response plan to protect the beach and nearby shorebird nesting area. The area is designated for recovery of the western snowy plover.

State and federal officials are in contact with the ship owner and insurer. The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department will take lead on managing nontoxic debris on the beach. Questions about the offshore portion of the incident will be addressed by the U.S. Coast Guard (PA3 Trevor Lilburn, 206-391-5864).

While remote, beach hikers are advised to steer clear of the debris area. Pedestrians must stay on the wet sand within the plover nesting area (https://bit.ly/wsplover).

# # #

Media advisory: the area is not only very difficult to reach, there are sensitive resources in the area. At this time, we’re requesting no on-site visits from reporters, helicopters, or camera crews.

Photos are available online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=17nMl8PqSYOvoQ3-6eRuIFRtJabN7igss and should be credited to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

 

 

Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Rock Point Cemetery in Gold Hill - 05/03/19

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 18!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities. You can make a big difference in just a few hours!

 

The Rock Point Cemetery in Gold Hill is hosting a clean-up on May 18. Over 20 sites are participating throughout the state. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org. Events are taking place throughout May and at other locations, so check your local cemetery if you don’t see an event near you.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize these statewide days of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

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Oregon Parks and Recreation Department seeks public comment on proposed updates to State Natural Area Program rules - 05/03/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is proposing updates to the State Natural Area Program rules and creating guidelines for provisional registrations. OPRD is accepting public comments on the proposed updates—which would require amendments to Oregon Administrative Rule—through May 31.

OPRD is proposing updating program rules to allow for a new designation: provisional registration. It would apply to natural areas under active or proposed restoration. Provisionally registered properties would be given five years to design and execute an OPRD-approved restoration management plan to meet the criteria for full registration under the program.

Other proposed changes would clarify language related to technology changes, establish nomenclature of State Natural Areas versus State Natural Area Reserves, and improve alignment of program operation direction with current goals.

Comments will be accepted until 5 p.m. May 31, 2019 and can be made online, in writing or via email.

After reviewing public comments, agency staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its June 2019 business meeting.

The Oregon Legislature established the Oregon State Natural Areas Program in 1979 as a way to protect high quality native ecosystems and rare plant and animal species.

In 2010, the Oregon Natural Areas Plan was developed which defines the full range of Oregon's natural heritage and guides the selection of priority areas for the establishment of natural areas.  The plan was updated in 2015 and guides the department’s actions in the program.

The full text of the proposed amendments to the program’s Oregon Administrative Rules, 736-045-0011 to 736-045-0505, is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/Rules/pages/index.aspx.

Day-use area at Tumalo State Park
Day-use area at Tumalo State Park
Event celebrating migratory birds takes flight at Tumalo State Park May 11 (Photo) - 05/02/19

BEND, Ore. – Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and the Children’s Forest of Central Oregon are partnering to host “Birds Without Borders” 9 .am. – 1 p.m. May 11 at Tumalo State Park. The free event coincides with International Migratory Bird Day and will feature family-friendly bird walks, birdhouse building, live bird of prey viewing, crafts to prevent bird-window collisions, games, stories and more.

All of the activities will be offered in both English and Spanish.

“Our goal is to bring awareness to these amazing migration stories, and also to inspire kids and adults to continue learning more and take action to protect these birds and their habitat,” said Katie Chipko, executive director of the Children’s Forest of Central Oregon. “Plus, bird watching is a great way to connect people of all ages to nature, and we hope that some families continue to do so after the event.” 

North America, including central Oregon, is a large hub for several species of migratory birds. Most originate from North America, Mexico and the Caribbean, though some travel from as far as Central and South America.

“It can be a long, perilous journey for the birds,” said Jill Nishball, OPRD program coordinator. “Besides pushing their physical limits, they also must navigate changing landscapes, habitat loss, pollution and other threats. It’s important for each of us to do our part to assist them on their journey.”

Other organizations involved with the event are High Desert Museum, Think Wild, Discover Your Forest, Sunriver Nature Center and the East Cascades Audubon Society.

The event is free, however Tumalo State Park charges a $5 day-use parking fee or requires visitors display a valid state parks day-use parking permit.

More info about the park, including maps, is on oregonstateparks.org.

More information about the Children’s Forest of Central Oregon is online.

Attached Media Files: Day-use area at Tumalo State Park
Grants awarded for main street projects throughout the state - 05/02/19

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 30 matching grants worth $5,244,261 to Oregon Main Street Network organizations across the state for building projects that encourage economic revitalization. Projects range from façade improvement to housing and seismic upgrades with awards ranging from $56,731-$200,000. 

 

The department funded projects that best conveyed the ability to stimulate private investment and local economic development, and best fit within the community’s long range plan for downtown vitality.

 

Funded projects include:

  • Dallas Downtown Association will receive $200,000 to stabilize a key historic building already in use as a restaurant and retail space and add rooms for a cycling hostel on the vacant second floor.
  • Many projects were for housing increases or improvements including $200,000 in Coos Bay for eleven new apartments, $200,000 in Cottage Grove for six apartments and retail upgrades, $149,751 for four new apartments in Klamath Falls, and $200,000 each for four new apartments in Tillamook and towards 10-12 new units in Woodburn.
  • Revitalize Downtown Stayton will use a $200,000 award to complete façade improvements on seven of nine properties in one block of downtown.
  • A $200,000 project in Enterprise includes apartments and complete façade restoration on the Litch Building.
  • Roof and awning improvements will be made to five commercial buildings in downtown Reedsport with a $166,000 award.
  • Several communities were selected for work to repair or restore their historic theaters: The purchase of the Alger Theater in Lakeview at $111,685; Liberty Theater façade and fire suppression at $100,000 in La Grande; and multiple improvements at the Columbia Theater in St. Helens.

Other communities awarded grants include Astoria, Athena, Baker City, Bandon, Beaverton, Burns, Canby, Carlton, Estacada, Florence, Gold Beach, Harrisburg, John Day, Oregon City, Pendleton, Port Orford, The Dalles, Turner.

 

The grant program was created during the 2015 legislative session, and placed with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. The legislation established a permanent fund for the Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant, and provided an initial infusion of funds from the sale of lottery bonds. The legislature included the Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant in the lottery bond package approved in 2017. The funds must be used to award grants to participating Oregon Main Street Network organizations to acquire, rehabilitate or construct buildings to facilitate community revitalization. The program also requires that at least 50 percent of the funds go to rural communities as defined in the bill.

 

To learn more about the Oregon Main Street Revitalization Grant or the Oregon Main Street Network, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

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Recreational Trails Program Advisory Committee meets May 15 in Bend - 05/02/19

BEND, Ore. - The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee will meet 8:30 a.m. – noon May 15 at the Oregon State University Cascades Innovation Co-Lab, 650 SW Columbia St, Bend. The meeting is open to the public. 

On the agenda: welcoming new Committee members, an update on the 2019 RTP grant cycle, overview of RTP scoring criteria, project updates, and preparation for the annual grant meeting scheduled for Oct. 22-24, 2019. View the full agenda here.

RTP is a federal aid assistance program of the United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. RTP grants provide, expand and improve recreational trails in Oregon. The RTP Advisory Committee serves to provide recommendations to Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) on the annual awarding of RTP grants.

For more information about the meeting or RTP, contact Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP Grant Coordinator, at 503-986-0716, or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">Jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov.

Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting must contact Jodi Bellefeuille at least three days in advance.

Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Willamette Valley Cemeteries - 05/01/19

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 11!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities. You can make a big difference in just a few hours!

 

Over 20 sites are participating throughout the state. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org. Events are taking place throughout May and at other locations, so check your local cemetery if you don’t see an event near you.

 

Willamette Valley area locations include Brookside Historic in Dayton; Sand Ridge near Lebanon, Gingles near Albany, Falls City in Falls City.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize these statewide days of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

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Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Granite Hill Cemetery - 05/01/19

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 11!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities. You can make a big difference in just a few hours!

 

The Granite Hill Cemetery in Grants Pass is hosting a clean-up on May 11. Over 20 sites are participating throughout the state. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org. Events are taking place throughout May and at other locations, so check your local cemetery if you don’t see an event near you.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize these statewide days of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

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Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Portland Area Cemeteries - 05/01/19

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 11!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities. You can make a big difference in just a few hours!

 

Over 20 sites are participating throughout the state. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org. Events are taking place throughout May and at other locations, so check your local cemetery if you don’t see an event near you.

 

Portland area locations include Pleasant Home, Mountain View Stark, Gresham Pioneer in Gresham; Lone Fir, Multnomah Park, Brainard, Columbia Pioneer, Jones, Powell Grove, Grand Army of the Republic, in Portland; Mountain View in Corbett; Middleton near Sherwood; and Douglass in Troutdale.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize these statewide days of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

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Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Marshfield Cemetery in Coos Bay - 05/01/19

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 11!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities. You can make a big difference in just a few hours!

 

The Marshfield Cemetery in Coos Bay is hosting clean-ups on both May 10 & 11. Over 20 sites are participating throughout the state. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org. Events are taking place throughout May and at other locations, so check your local cemetery if you don’t see an event near you.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize these statewide days of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

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Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Deadwood Cemetery in Lane County - 05/01/19

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 11!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities. You can make a big difference in just a few hours!

 

The Deadwood Pioneer Cemetery in Lane County is hosting a clean-up on May 11. Over 20 sites are participating throughout the state. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org. Events are taking place throughout May and at other locations, so check your local cemetery if you don’t see an event near you.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize these statewide days of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

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Grants awarded for veterans and war memorials projects throughout the state - 05/01/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department awarded five grants totaling $150,000 for projects across the state that create or preserve memorials to veterans or wars. Awards range from range from $18,700-74,500. 

Funded projects include:

  • Construction of new memorials in Happy Valley and Lake Oswego.
  • Replacements of sidewalks and added access sidewalks at the Soldier’s Monument at Lone Fir Cemetery in Portland.
  • Install a memorial at an existing site in Pendleton.

This competitive grant program was created by the Oregon legislature in 2005. Applicants must be local or tribal governments and the memorial must be on public land.

For more information on the Veteran and War Memorials grant program, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Celebrate National Historic Preservation Month with annual event May 9 at State Capitol State Park - 04/29/19

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), will host the 11th annual Preservation Month Fair 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. May 9 at State Capitol State Park in Salem. 20 heritage organizations will be displaying historic military vehicles, artifacts and engaging exhibits that tell Oregon's story and highlight preservation projects in communities throughout the state.

 

“May is National Historic Preservation Month and it’s an opportunity for communities to reflect on significant places, artifacts, and collections that help tell the stories of our past,” said Christine Curran, Deputy Historic Preservation Officer. “The fair aims to recognize the contributions of those individuals and organizations that preserve those stories and places.”

 

The fair will be set up on the Capitol grounds on the north side of Court Street, opposite the Capitol building. The event is free and open to the public.

 

On display at the event will be an operating World War II M3A1 Stuart Light Tank and a U.S. Military jeep used during the Korean War. A free tour of the Capitol grounds led by OPRD staff will leave from the fair at 11:10 a.m., ending at the Capitol building. A separate, free tour of the Capitol tower and observation deck will begin at noon at the information kiosk inside the Capitol building.

 

Please arrive 10 minutes early for each tour. A signed liability waiver is required for the Capitol tower tour.

 

More information about National Historic Preservation Month:  www.nps.gov/nR/feature/presmonth/index.htm

 

Learn more about Oregon Heritage: www.oregonheritage.org

 

Event exhibitors: the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians; Coquille Indian Tribe; Willamette Heritage Center; Hoover Minthorn Museum; Deepwood Estate; City of Salem Landmarks Program; Lord and Schryver Conservancy; Antique Powerland; Caples House Museum Complex; Pioneer Newell Village; Bush House Museum; Oregon Museum of Mental Health; Frank Lloyd Wright Gordon House at the Oregon Garden; Oregon Capitol Foundation; Oregon State Library; Friends of Silver Falls State Park; Oregon Department of Transportation; Oregon State Archives; Oregon Forrest Resource Center; and Oregon Heritage.

Public invited to comment on federal preservation grant award in Dayton - 04/23/19

The City of Dayton will receive a grant through the federal Historic Preservation Fund, administered by Oregon State Historic Preservation Office to fund the following local preservation project.

 

Brookside Cemetery

$10,000.00 grant funds

Repair approximately 91 monuments. Complete remote sensing, to determine evidence of burials in an undocumented area of the cemetery. There will be no ground disturbance.

 

This notice serves to make the public aware of the projects and solicit comments pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The comment period is open for 30 days from the date of this announcement. To provide comments or learn more information about this project visit www.oregonheritage.org and follow the federal grant public comment page link or contact Tracy Schwartz at acy.Schwartz@oregon.gov">Tracy.Schwartz@oregon.gov or 503-986-0661.

 

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 authorizes a program of federal matching grants, known as the Historic Preservation Fund, to assist the various states in carrying out historic preservation activities. The Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and in Oregon, is administered through the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

May events at Champoeg include Founders' Day, lecture about historic flood - 04/23/19

The annual Founders’ Day celebration and a lecture about the infamous 1861 Champoeg flood are set to kick off the summer season at Champoeg State Heritage Area.

Founders’ Day, celebrating the 1843 vote held in Champoeg that established the first provisional government west of the Mississippi River, will be 1 – 2:30 p.m. May 4 at the park. The annual event is free and will feature living history actors, a fur trapper rifle volley salute and a ceremony to honor the men who participated in the 1843 vote.

The flood lecture, delivered by Willamette University Visiting Professor Cayla Hill, will be 1 p.m. May 18 at the park’s visitor center. Hill will expand on the history and current archeological evidence of the 1861 flood, which decimated the modest river town.

Founders’ Day celebrates a vote held in Champoeg by local settlers on May 2, 1843. A large group gathered that day to decide the future of the Oregon territory. After a spirited debate, a slim majority voted “aye” to form Oregon’s first provisional government, laying the groundwork for Oregon’s statehood in 1859. Founders’ Day has been held annually at Champoeg since 1901.

Cayla Hill has been a visiting professor with Willamette University since 2016. She is an Applied Anthropology doctorate candidate with Oregon State University (OSU), and holds a master’s in Applied Anthropology from OSU.

For more information about the events, contact ranger Dan Klug at 503-678-1251. Information about the park, including maps, is on oregonstateparks.org.

Star Party visitor and telescope
Star Party visitor and telescope
Prineville Reservoir Star Party event celebrates 20th anniversary with special activities and stargazing May 4 (Photo) - 04/23/19

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – The annual Star Party event at Prineville Reservoir State Park turns 20 this year and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is celebrating with a full day of space-related events on May 4. The event is free and will feature kayak tours, astronomy exhibits, scientist-led presentations, model rocket building and launching, and stargazing with provided telescopes.

“It’s an important milestone and we’re excited to celebrate the stars with the community again this year,” said Paul Patton, OPRD resource specialist. “Prineville Reservoir is one of the best spots in Oregon for stargazing and the event is a great start-of-summer activity for everyone to enjoy.”

List of activities:

  • 9 – 11:30 a.m. Kayak tours of the reservoir, led by park staff. Space is limited; reserve your seats online at the state parks event page.
  • 1 p.m. “Solar System Stroll” presentation. Learn about each planet in our cosmic neighborhood from Oregon Observatory volunteers.
  • 1 – 4 p.m. Visit each star party exhibit: safe solar viewing station; meteorite display; virtual reality experience station; telescope displays; space photos and artwork from renowned artist John Foster; various children’s activities focused on astronomical science; information on stars and planets; and more.
  • 2 and 3 p.m. Join Oregon Observatory speakers to learn about the proposed first human missions to Mars and how astronauts will survive on the Red Planet.
  • 4 p.m. Young rocket scientists can design, build and safely launch their own rockets.
  • 7 p.m. Bob Grossfeld, Oregon Observatory director and NASA representative, will present an update on current space exploration missions.
  • 9:30 p.m. Join other stargazers at the permanent observatory housing to peer through various telescopes generously provided by professional and amateur astronomers. The largest telescope, nicknamed “Big Doug,” is 16-inches in diameter.

OPRD partners with the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver for the event.

Prineville Reservoir State Park is 16 miles southeast of Prineville, off Highway 26. More information about the park, including overnight stay details, is on oregonstateparks.org.