Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept.
Emergency Messages as of 9:21 am, Sun. Aug. 2
No information currently posted; operating as usual.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept.
Primary email address for a new account:

Emergency Alerts News Releases  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
New state park on the coast between Tierra del Mar and Cape Lookout in Tillamook County.
New state park on the coast between Tierra del Mar and Cape Lookout in Tillamook County.
Date change for meetings to plan new state park near Tierra del Mar (Photo) - 07/31/15
Pacific City OR -- Meetings originally set for August 6 in Pacific City to kick off planning for a new state park on the Beltz property north of Tierra del Mar have been rescheduled to August 27. A desire to avoid overlapping with the Tillamook County Fair prompted the change.

The new meeting date is Thursday, August 27 at the Kiawanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiwanda Drive, Pacific City 97135. An advisory committee will meet from 1-4 p.m. The public meeting will follow from 6-8 p.m.. The public may attend and observe the advisory committee meeting, however only comments from the committee will be taken at this meeting. Everyone is welcome to participate in the evening meeting.

A neighborhood meeting on the same topic on August 1 in the Tierra del Mar Meeting Hall will still occur as scheduled.

More information on planning for the unnamed park is available online at http://beltzplan.com/
Red Bridge State Park to host overnight guided camping trip - 07/27/15
La Grande, OR - Red Bridge State Park welcomes beginning or out-of practice campers to join in an overnight guided camping excursion August 21-23, part of the statewide "Let's Go Camping" program hosted by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD).

For $30 per family, OPRD provides tents, sleeping bags and other gear. Volunteers will help campers set up tents, build campfires, prepare meals in the campsite and more.

Activities will include: two nights of camping along the scenic Grande Ronde River, camp games galore, and plenty of s'mores. Let's Go Camping programs will be held at 19 different campgrounds throughout the state through Labor Day weekend. Participating campgrounds are listed at oregonstateparks.org (Click on "Things to Do"). Register online or by calling 888-953-7677.
Grants available for Oregon heritage and history projects - 07/24/15
The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants for qualified projects for the conservation, development and interpretation of Oregon's cultural heritage. Awards typically range between $5,000 and $20,000. Projects can include anything related to Oregon heritage, and priority will be given to projects that preserve, develop or interpret threatened heritage resources or heritage resources of statewide significance. The grant application deadline is Sept. 30.

Projects may include theatrical performances, collections preservation and access, exhibits, oral history projects, public education events, organizational archives projects, films and more. Oregon Black Pioneers received funding for its most recent exhibit. Cascade AIDS Project collected oral histories and made them accessible. Portland State University hosted the Archaeology Roadshow. Southern Oregon Historical Society completed seismic upgrades to its collections storage.

"We hope to see a variety of projects that engage Oregonians in heritage," states Kyle Jansson, Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator. "We encourage the documentation, preservation and exploration of all aspects of Oregon's heritage."

Simple grant applications are online. There is plenty of support for preparing them.

"Our goal is to support organizations of all sizes all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process," notes Kuri Gill, the grants program coordinator.
Oregon Heritage grants programs staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission's mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

To learn more about the grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

###
Tumalo State Park to Host Overnight Guided Camping Trip - 07/23/15
Bend, OR - Tumalo State Park welcomes beginning or out-of practice campers to join in an overnight guided camping excursion August 7-9, part of the statewide "Let's Go Camping" program hosted by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD).

For $30 per family, OPRD provides tents, sleeping bags and other gear. Volunteers will help campers set up tents, build campfires, prepare meals in the campsite and more.

Activities will include: archery practice with Bend Parks & Recreation, an introduction to fishing clinic, an ancestral fire starting demo presented by Wildheart Nature School, and plenty of s'mores. Let's Go Camping programs will be held at 19 different campgrounds throughout the state through Labor Day weekend. Participating campgrounds are listed at oregonstateparks.org (Click on "Things to Do"). Register online or by calling 888-953-7677.
L.L. Stub Stewart State Park to host overnight guided camping trip - 07/16/15
L.L. Stub Stewart State Park welcomes beginning campers to join in an overnight guided camping excursion July 31- August 2, part of the statewide "Let's Go Camping" program hosted by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD).

Stub Stewart is just 34 miles west of Portland, and is home to an 18-hole disc golf course and 25 miles of hiking, biking, and equestrian trails that highlight its 1,800 acres of forest glades, streams and wildflowers.

For $30 per family, OPRD provides tents, sleeping bags and other gear for those interested in learning more about camping. Volunteers will help campers set up tents, build campfires, prepare meals in the campsite and more. Activities could include ranger-led hikes, introduction to disc-golf, and plenty of s'mores.

Let's Go Camping programs are scheduled throughout the state through Labor Day weekend. Participating campgrounds are listed at oregonstateparks.org (Click on "Things to Do"). Registration is required. Register online or by calling 888-953-7677.
Steelhead to play at Milo McIver music festival commemorating the original Vortex concert - 07/16/15
Estacada, OR -- Milo McIver State Park will host Exploring Vortex I: Music in the Park, celebrating the 45th anniversary of the original Vortex rock concert held at the park in August 1970. The celebration will be from 3-8 p.m. August 8 in the Vortex Meadows.

Rock and roll band Steelhead, of Vancouver, Wash., will perform, and the celebration also will include family friendly activities such as a tie-dye booth, hula hooping, a photography exhibit and historical displays. A vendor will sell barbecue; attendees can also bring their own food and beverages, including alcoholic beverages.

Vortex I was the only state-sponsored rock festival in American history and was a novel concept in 1970, when both Woodstock and the Kent State shootings were forefront in Americans' minds. Governor Tom McCall made history by partnering with antiwar demonstrators to organize a concert at Milo McIver in an attempt to avoid conflict in downtown Portland during a scheduled visit of President Nixon.

As a celebration of Vortex history, visitors can share their experiences by bringing any photos of the 1970 event; they will be scanned and returned on the spot and added to the Vortex archive. Volunteers will also record anyone interested in sharing their Vortex stories, to be shared with the Estacada Community Library in effort to paint a full picture of how Vortex affected the local community.

This event is open to the public, and donations will be accepted to fund a permanent monument in Vortex Meadow. A $5 Oregon State Park parking permit is required for each vehicle.
Leaburg Hydroelectirc Project Historic District
Leaburg Hydroelectirc Project Historic District
Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 07/14/15
The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District in Lane County is among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project was put into service in January 1930 and continues to generate electric power as part of the Eugene Water & Electric Board system, a municipally owned utility located in Lane County, Oregon. It is located along approximately five miles of the McKenzie River in the vicinity of Leaburg, and consists of the dam and powerhouse; the reservoir, canal and tailrace; and Leaburg Village, built to house dam workers.

The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project was constructed between 1928 and 1930 and completed as originally envisioned in June 1950. Designed by the Portland engineering firm of Stevens & Koon, the facility is significant for its engineering design, incorporating innovative technological features such as the Broome Self-Closing Sluice Gate and three 100'-long roller gates. It is also significant for its art and architecture. The powerhouse was designed by Ellis Lawrence, the founder of the University of Oregon school of architecture. The bas relief panels on the building were created by the nationally prominent sculptor Harry Camden Poole. The powerhouse is considered one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture used in an industrial setting in Oregon.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the site's nomination in their February 2015 meeting. The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District is only the second property in the Leaburg area to be listed in the National Register, the first being the Old McKenzie Fish Hatchery Historic District. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).
OR_CoosCounty_MasonicTemple_WEB.jpg
OR_CoosCounty_MasonicTemple_WEB.jpg
First National Bank of Bandon listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 07/13/15
The First National Bank of Bandon in downtown Bandon is Oregon's latest entry in the National Register of Historic Places.

The temple-front bank was designed by Bror Benjamin Ostlind, a well-known and prominent architect from Marshfield, Oregon, present-day Coos Bay. Ostlind was born in Karlstad, Sweden in 1885, and moved to Marshfield in 1906. He was an active community member, starting the Long Fellows Club, an organization for extra tall men (he was 6'4"). In this role, he was instrumental in putting pressure on large hotels and Pullman cars to install accommodations for extra-tall persons. He was also a successful businessman, owning several enterprises in the community.

In the bank building's design, Ostlind combined the use of a relatively new and structurally robust material, concrete with "cold twisted rod" reinforcement. The Neoclassical style of the building resulted in an attractive and functional commercial bank building that conveyed the stability of the institution to the community, while providing a secure and fire-resistant location for the bank. The design was successful, and the building survived the Great Fire of 1936 that razed downtown Bandon. Since 1955 the upper floor of the building has been the home of Bandon Lodge No. 130 Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. The ground floor currently houses two retail shops.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination at their meeting in February 2015. More than 2,000 properties in Oregon are now listed in the National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).
Historic Cemeteries Commission meets July 17 in Bend - 07/13/15
The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet at 1 p.m. July 17 at the Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 NW Idaho Ave. Agenda items will include grant reports, current projects and upcoming plans. The commission will invite public comments. For information visit the historic cemeteries page of www.oregonheritage.org.

This meeting is in conjunction with the historic cemetery and marker repair workshop July 18. All of the events are free and open to the public. The workshop will be from 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Tumalo Pioneer Cemetery, about 1.8 miles north of Tumalo on the Cline Falls Highway. The free workshop will address marker assessment, cleaning, leveling and repair.

State law established the seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. More information about commission activities and the meeting may be obtained from coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .

###
OR_JeffersounCounty_EnochAndMaryHomesteadAndOrchardSite_WEB.jpg
OR_JeffersounCounty_EnochAndMaryHomesteadAndOrchardSite_WEB.jpg
Crooked River National Grassland sites listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 07/13/15
Two abandoned homesteads that are now part of the Crooked River National Grassland in Jefferson County are among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The two places are the Julius and Sarah McCoin homestead and the Enoch and Mary Cyrus homestead sites. The sites in the Culver area typify the settlement and abandonment of hundreds of homesteads in central Oregon from 1868-1937, and are on the Crooked River National Grassland managed today by the US Forest Service.

The U.S. Forest Service's primary roles relate to natural resources. However, it also plays a role in caretaking important cultural resources on federal land. These two sites are important examples of homesteads that were settled in Jefferson County in the 1880s and abandoned during the Great Depression.

More than 700 homestead claims were filed in Jefferson County before the termination of the homesteading laws. Of the 225 homesteads within today's Crooked River National Grassland, more than 90 appear to have been abandoned as homesteads after only a few years of habitation. The two sites evoke the homesteader experience with their surface and subsurface archaeology, surface features, domestic plantings, and the agricultural landscape.

Enoch Cyrus, a leader of several community organizations, was one of the first farmers to grow winter wheat in eastern Oregon in the late 19th century and to mechanize farming. A prized variety of winter wheat ('Cyrus Wheat') is named after the family. The majority of wheat grown in Oregon today is winter wheat. The McCoin's primary agricultural endeavor was livestock, including sheep and high quality horses.

Long-term instability in precipitation, collapsing farm prices, cumulative effects of environmental degradation, and indebtedness brought about the collapse of most of the homesteads. By 1934, fewer than 50 of the 700 original homestead applicants remained in Jefferson County. Some Jefferson County residents petitioned the administration of President Franklin Roosevelt for assistance. The result was the Resettlement Administration, a federal relief agency, purchasing uneconomic farms, retiring them from intensive cultivation, and helping farm families find new opportunities in other places.

"We applaud the U.S. Forest Service's efforts to preserve and develop cultural heritage resources," said Chrissy Curran, the deputy state historic preservation officer. "These two sites help us understand how the families sought to carve out an existence in central Oregon in the late 19th and early 20th centuries."

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).
Living History Days set for July 18-19 at Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area - 07/10/15
Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area presents a look at the fort more than 150 years ago when soldiers watched over the Willamette Valley during the Civil War. The event is July 18-19 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. both days.

Costumed interpreters will share stories of the soldiers who served their country in an isolated, yet important military installation. Park visitors can walk through the tent camp and watch the soldiers drilling on the historic parade ground and standing sentry. Park staff will also lead guided tours of the fort grounds. Call (503) 879-5814 for more information.

The event and parking are free. Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area is located on Highway 22, just north of the Highway 18/22 junction.
Wallowa Lake State Park to host overnight guided camping trip - 07/08/15
Joseph, OR - Wallowa Lake State Park welcomes beginning and out-of-practice campers to join in an overnight guided camping excursion July 31-Aug. 2, part of the statewide "Let's Go Camping" program hosted by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD).

For $30 per family, OPRD provides tents, sleeping bags and other gear. Volunteers will help campers set up tents, build campfires, prepare meals in the campsite and more.

Activities will include a ranger-led hike, swimming in a scenic lake, and plenty of s'mores. Let's Go Camping programs are at campgrounds throughout the state through Labor Day weekend. Participating campgrounds are listed at oregonstateparks.org (Click on "Things to Do"). Register online or by calling 888-953-7677.
LaPine State Park hosts free summer mountain biking tours - 07/08/15
LaPine, OR -- Experience the thrill of the ride on one of three free guided mountain biking tours at LaPine State Park this summer. The rides are hosted by Oregon State Parks and Bend bike tour and rental company Cog Wild.

Rides are from 4 to 6 p.m. on July 16 and Sept. 12, with an additional ride to be scheduled in August. The rides are intended for beginners and will be led by a mountain bike tour guide from Cog Wild. They will cover basic information including equipment, safety, off-road biking skills and drills. The route takes off through the trees and follows the Deschutes River.

Advance registration is required. Call the LaPine State Park office at 541-536-2428.
Participants can use their own bikes, or the park has 10 bikes that can be reserved at the time of registration. Children must wear a bike helmet and be at least 12 years old to participate.

The program is part of the Let's Go series of guided recreational activities offered at parks throughout the state by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). Go to oregonstateparks.org and search the event calendar for a list of activities statewide.
Hoodoo Ridge Lookout
Hoodoo Ridge Lookout
Two early Forest Service sites in Oregon listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 07/06/15
Two early sites of U.S. Forest Service efforts in Oregon, one in Marion County and the other in Wallowa County, are among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

The two places are the Hoodoo Ridge Lookout Historic District near Troy and the Olallie Meadows Guard Station near Estacada. Both indicate the types of facilities and activities undertaken by the Forest Service from its foundings a century ago through the Great Depression.

The U.S. Forest Service was launched with limited resources, yet with millions of acres of land to manage; These two places show the ingenuity and resourcefulness of early forest rangers in carrying out their myriad of duties. They are unique in their development.

The Hoodoo Ridge Lookout was constructed in 1925 to support fire detection and suppression. Initially a six-foot wide crow's nest platform in the top of a 110-foot-tall ponderosa pine, the site was supplemented in 1933 by a 101-foot-tall steel tower built by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps. These and several other supplemental buildings are included in the district designation.

The Olallie Meadows Guard Station was hastily and inexpensively constructed in 1910 by Forest Service personnel from site-sourced materials, including a rough-hewn peeled log foundation and walls, lodgepole pine roof and structure, hand-split cedar shake roof, and field stone steps.

The cabin served as a guard station until 1932, allowing rangers to stay overnight and to conduct forest patrols. Field rangers did a variety of tasks including managing small timber sales, fighting fires, and building roads and trails.

"We applaud the U.S. Forest Service's efforts to preserve and develop cultural heritage resources," said Chrissy Curran, the acting deputy state historic preservation officer. "These two sites help us understand how the Forest Service managed the state's forests during the first century of its existence."

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).
Walkers and hikers enjoy the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. A new report conducted by Oregon State University and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department shows non-motorized trail use trends in Oregon.
Walkers and hikers enjoy the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. A new report conducted by Oregon State University and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department shows non-motorized trail use trends in Oregon.
New State Report Highlights Non-motorized Trail Use (Photo) - 07/06/15
A new state report on non-motorized trail use summarizes survey results of approximately 1,400 trail users across the state, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) announces.

The survey included questions about use patterns, user experiences and preferences, as well as the economic contribution of trail recreation. Non-motorized trail use includes walking, hiking, running, backpacking, bicycling on hard surface trails, mountain biking, horseback riding, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.

"Trails continue to be the one of the main ways Oregonians from any background enjoy the outdoors," says Lisa Sumption, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department director. "We're hearing that people want their smaller, local trails connected to the longer, regional ones so they can enjoy a more natural experience. We agencies can get there by cooperating on planning, maintenance, and grants."

Results showed that non-motorized trail activities generated an estimated $2.1 billion in expenditure across the state in 2014. In turn, this expenditure contributed 21,730 jobs, $1 billion in value added, and $672 million in labor income. When out-of-state visitors are included, the estimated amounts increase to 24,340 jobs, $1.2 billion in value added, and $753 million in labor income.

Other highlights of the report include:
* Walking and hiking are the most popular trail activities.
* Walking or running with a dog off-leash was the second-most frequent activity on trails.
* Two-thirds of respondents walked or ran specifically on an ocean beach at least once during the past 12 months.
* Older Oregonians are less likely to participate in trail activities overall. Most popular trail activities for this demographic include walking on local trails or paths and cross-country skiing.
* Eleven percent of statewide respondents use recreation-oriented trails to walk or bike to work, with the highest percentage in Lane County (36 percent).
* Respondents most commonly prefer dirt surface trails for all activities other than biking on hard surface trails.
* Respondents prefer creating new trails to reduce crowding, rather than letting existing trails remain crowded. This is especially true for mountain bikers.
* Respondents' top priority for new trails was adding walking/ hiking trails both inside and outside one's community. Trails for hard surface bicycling were the next highest priority for within one's community, while trails for backpacking were the next highest priority for outside one's community.
* Repair of major trail damage was identified as the highest funding priority over the next 10 years, followed by protection of natural features and routine trail maintenance.
* The top trail concern was an inability to experience the natural environment while using trails. Respondents also indicated that they would like to see more trail information on the internet and more trail signs and markers.
* Word of mouth is the most frequent source for seeking information about trails, followed by agency websites and printed maps.

OPRD contracted with Oregon State University in 2014 to conduct the survey, a component of the 2015-2024 Statewide Trails Plan. Results provide state planners with up-to-date information on trails recreation for use in local and regional planning. OPRD will also use the information in distributing grants to federal, state, and local government agencies that maintain and develop non-motorized trail opportunities.

To view the entire report, visit http://tinyurl.com/qydclea.
Public meeting July 20 for proposed Molalla River Scenic Waterway - 07/06/15
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will hold an open house public meeting about the potential designation of a portion of the Molalla River as a State Scenic Waterway. The proposed section runs from the Table Rock Fork to Glen Avon Bridge. The meeting will be July 20 from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Molalla Public Library, 201 E. 5th St., Molalla.

The intent of the meeting is to learn about scenic waterways and review the nonbinding draft management plan for the Molalla River. Comments will be accepted at the meeting, as well as via email and mail from July 14 through Aug. 19.

Scenic waterways staff will incorporate public comments into a report for OPRD Commissioners to review. The governor will make the final decision on designation in December. If the river is designated, OPRD will host additional meetings to gather public comments before finalizing a management plan and initiating rule-making.

The State Scenic Waterways Program seeks to balance protection of natural resources, scenic value and recreation. Scenic waterway designations do not affect existing water rights.

Written comments can be submitted by email to scenic.waterways@oregon.gov or mailed to OPRD Scenic Waterways Program, 725 Summer St. Suite C, Salem, OR 97301.

The draft plan, meeting materials and other information are available at http://bit.ly/scenicwaterways. For more information, contact Laurel Hillmann at (503) 986-0700 or laurel.hillmann@oregon.gov or Rocky Houston at (503) 986-0750 or rocky.houston@oregon.gov.