Oregon Health Authority
Emergency Messages as of 4:11 pm, Sat. Apr. 21
No information currently posted. Operating as usual.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Health Authority. Please use any browser other than Internet Explorer.
Primary email address for a new account:

Emergency Alerts News Releases  
And/or follow our FlashAlerts via Twitter

About FlashAlert on Twitter:

FlashAlert utilizes the free service Twitter to distribute emergency text messages. While you are welcome to register your cell phone text message address directly into the FlashAlert system, we recommend that you simply "follow" the FlashAlert account for Oregon Health Authority by clicking on the link below and logging in to (or creating) your free Twitter account. Twitter sends messages out exceptionally fast thanks to arrangements they have made with the cell phone companies.

Click here to add Oregon Health Authority to your Twitter account or create one.

Hide this Message


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets April 20 in Wilsonville and by webinar - 04/19/18

April 19, 2018

Contact: Jennifer Uhlman, 503-939-5267, .m.uhlman@state.or.us">jennifer.m.uhlman@state.or.us  (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets April 20 in Wilsonville and by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup

When: April 20, 2-5 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E., Wilsonville

The public may also attend by webinar or by conference call at 877-848-7030, participant code 695684. Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6656206289436141313.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; reflections from March meeting; scope and work plan refresher; review draft conceptual framework; review draft criteria for measure recommendations; public comments open at 4:45 p.m.

Details: For more information including a full agenda, please visit the technical workgroup’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/KR-Health.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Melisa Otrugman at 503-689-5238, 711 TTY, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

# # #

Wallowa County begins transferring public health authority to OHA May 1 - 04/19/18

April 19, 2018

Wallowa County begins transferring public health authority to OHA May 1

OHA to continue some services after county unanimously passes ordinance April 16

The Oregon Health Authority is preparing to take over some public health services in Wallowa County after the county’s Board of Commissioners voted unanimously Monday to transfer its local public health authority to the state agency.

“Because of shrinking funds, the board made the difficult decision to close the public health department as of May 1,” said county commissioner Susan Roberts. “We have been working closely with Jodi Beck, current local public health administrator, OHA and other partners to ensure a smooth transition.”

By law, the county was required to pass an ordinance before the transfer could happen. While legally the transfer does not occur until Oct. 13, 2018, Wallowa County will no longer have a local public health administrator as of May 1. That means OHA will assume responsibility for continuing services it is statutorily obligated to provide to protect the public’s health, including:

  • Monitoring communicable diseases and controlling outbreaks.
  • Enforcing the Indoor Clean Air Act.
  • Ensuring access to safe drinking water.
  • Ensuring access to WIC services.
  • Licensing and inspecting food, pool and lodging facilities.

Vital records will move to the Wallowa County Clerk’s office as of May 1. Immunization and reproductive health services will continue to be provided through some local health clinics.

All other governmental public health services will end in Wallowa County. Over the next six months, the OHA Public Health Division will evaluate which of these services the division will take on.

“We recognize the Wallowa County Board of Commissioners has the legal ability to transfer local public health authority to OHA,” said Lillian Shirley, director of the OHA Public Health Division. "We will work closely with the board and its staff during the shift from local to state provision of public health services.

“We will thoroughly examine and address any potential gaps in public health services that have been provided in the county, although just what those gaps in services are has yet to be determined,” Shirley said.

In response to the county’s decision, the Public Health Division has established an incident management team with staff representatives from across the division to plan for and communicate about the transition, including sharing information with local partners, clients and the general public.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2Jbrz4x

Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee to meet April 23, May 9, May 14 - 04/18/18

April 18, 2018

Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee to meet April 23, May 9, May 14

What: A series of public meetings of the Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) to implement requirements set forth by SB 478 of the 2015 legislative session

Agenda: Provide background information and purpose of RAC; review the rulemaking process; review draft rule language; request input and feedback; discuss next steps

When: April 23, 9 a.m.-noon via teleconference; May 9, 9 a.m.-noon (in person); May 14, 9 a.m.-noon (in person, if needed)

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting on May 9 will be in Room 1E; the May 14 meeting if necessary, will be in Room 1B. The public may attend any or all all of the three meetings by telephone conference call at 888-363-4735, participant code 1027039.

Who: The Toxic Free Kids Rules Advisory Committee includes representation of Oregon Environmental Council, The Toy Association, Oregon Business and Industry, American Chemistry Council, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Multnomah County Department of Health, Metro Regional Government, Washington Department of Ecology.

Program contact: Justin Waltz, 971-673-1217, justin.waltz@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Justin Waltz, 971-673-0429, 711 TTY, or Justin.Waltz@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2JWo7Mf

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee to meet April 26 in Portland - 04/18/18

April 18, 2018

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee to meet April 26 in Portland

What: A regular public meeting of the Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee

When: April 26, 1-2:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Please note that space is limited.

Who: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the Governor and comprised of private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of Oregonians’ tobacco use.

Details: Agenda items include: updates on the tobacco retail evaluation, Tobacco 21 and compliance checks; and a Tobacco Metrics Accountability Work Group update.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Barnard at 971-673-1347, 711 TTY or ah.barnard@state.or.us">sarah.barnard@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2vsu4xa

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee quarterly meeting April 23 - 04/18/18

April 18, 2018

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee quarterly meeting April 23

What: The state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee is holding its quarterly meeting. This meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Review site visit findings; review project modification request; discuss next site visit; discuss modification of administrative rules for Dental Pilot Project program.

When: April 23, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference line: 888-273-3658, participant code 76-64-09

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; develop new categories of dental personnel; accelerate the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teach new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

http://bit.ly/2HciSX0

 

 

Attend a public meeting this week to help shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan - 04/17/18

April 17, 2018

Attend a public meeting this week to help shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Oregon Health Authority is holding a series of public meetings to gather suggestions that will help shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan (OHP).

The first meeting is this Friday, April 20, and two others will follow on consecutive Saturdays:

  • Portland – Friday, April 20, 9-11 a.m., Mercy Corps Northwest, 43 SW Naito Parkway
  • The Dalles – Saturday, April 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wahtonka High School, 3601 West 10th Street
  • Woodburn – Saturday, April 28, 9 a.m. to noon, Legacy Health Wellspring Conference Center, 1475 Mt. Hood Ave.

Anyone is welcome, and advance registration is appreciated.

Spanish language interpretation services will be available at the meetings. If you need interpretation in another language or have a request for accommodation, please contact Stephanie Jarem at em@state.or.us">stephanie.jarem@state.or.us.

The Oregon Health Plan and coordinated care organizations

At the meetings the public can make suggestions to improve the Oregon Health Plan and coordinated care organizations (CCOs).

CCOs are independent organizations that contract with the state to provide health care for nearly 1 million Oregonians on OHP.

CCOs were formed in 2012 with a commitment to improve care and save taxpayers money.

Since then, CCOs have saved taxpayers an estimated $2.2 billion, reduced emergency room visits, and improved health care.

But improvements are still needed in several areas, including:

  • Better access and treatment in mental health and addiction medicine
  • Finding new ways to limit growth in health care spending
  • Paying providers for improving quality rather than for each visit or test
  • Providing better access to housing, transportation, education, and other health-related services
  • Reducing language and cultural barriers that affect access to health care

The next CCO contracts start in 2020, but OHA is taking public comment now to help inform those contracts.

# # #

Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 20 in Wilsonville - 04/17/18

April 17, 2018

Contact: Heather Johnson, 503-508-8276, .n.johnson@state.or.us">heather.n.johnson@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 20 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: April 20, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 9:10 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 211, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by phone. Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523. Conference line: 888-204-5984, participant code 1277-166. The telephone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda and updates; public testimony; program planning, electronic health records and screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (EHR-SBIRT); oral health measures; CCO 2.0 update

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #
 

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY, .n.johnson@state.or.us">heather.n.johnson@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Hvg1f7

Conference of Local Health Officials meets April 19 in Portland - 04/16/18

April 16, 2018

Conference of Local Health Officials meets April 19 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO)

Agenda: Public Health Advisory Board Committee updates; discussion of proposed 2019-21 Public Health Modernization priorities; update on Tobacco Prevention and Education Program accountability metrics and program element; OHS fiscal monitoring information; local public health authority (LPHA) updates; Intergovernmental Agreement for Financing of Public Health Services equipment inventory requirements.

When: April 19, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon Street, Room 1E, Portland

The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs, and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147 (ORS 431.340).

Program contact: Danna Drum, 971-673-1223, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2H0B3CS

Cannabis Commission's Training Subcommittee meets April 20 in Portland - 04/13/18

April 13, 2018

Cannabis Commission's Training Subcommittee meets April 20 in Portland

What: The first monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission's Training Subcommittee

Agenda: The agenda will include review of subcommittee description and directives, and review of its communications and schedule; discussion of priority focus areas and discussion of special interest groups and other resource needs

When: April 20, 9-11 a.m. Time will be allotted at the end of the meeting for public comments, which are limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1A (on the main floor of the building), 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session though HB 2198. The commission consists of the state public health officer or the public health officer’s designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2qupytn

Cannabis Commission's Access to Patients Subcommittee meets April 16 in Portland - 04/13/18

April 13, 2018

Cannabis Commission's Access to Patients Subcommittee meets April 16 in Portland

What: The first monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission's Access to Patients Subcommittee

Agenda: TBD

When: April 16, 2-4 p.m. Time will be allotted at the end of the meeting for public comments, which are limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1A (on the main floor of the building), 800 NE Oregon Street Portland

The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session though HB 2198. The commission consists of the state public health officer or the public health officer’s designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2qskdma

CCO leadership listening session on future of coordinated care - 04/11/18

April 11, 2018

CCO leadership listening session set on future of coordinated care

What: CCO leadership listening session regarding CCO 2.0

When: Thursday, April 19, 12:30-1:30 p.m.

Where: Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137 C-D, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem, Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-363-4735, participant code 1593726#.

Agenda: CCO 2.0 presentation and discussion

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983 or ey.scroggin@state.or.us">jeffrey.scroggin@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Lower_Willamette_Fish_Meal_Recommendations_a.PNG
Lower_Willamette_Fish_Meal_Recommendations_a.PNG
OHA expands health advisory for Lower Willamette River resident fish (Photo) - 04/11/18

EDITORS: OHA environmental public health experts will be available for interviews today between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. in Room 1C of the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

April 11, 2018

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

OHA expands health advisory for Lower Willamette River resident fish

Agency recommends limited meal sizes due to elevated PCBs found in fish tissue

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority is updating an existing health advisory issued June 2004 for resident fish in the Portland Harbor area of the Lower Willamette River.

The advisory effectively expands the 2004 advisory for two reasons:

  • Fish and shellfish tissue data made available to OHA shows the level of polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, found in resident species of the Lower Willamette River warrants updating meal recommendations.
  • Additional fish tissue data collected outside the Portland Harbor study area warrants expanding the boundary of the fish advisory.

The boundary now encompasses the Lower Willamette River from the Sellwood Bridge to its confluence with the Columbia, to include Multnomah Channel from its confluence with the Willamette to the Sauvie Island Bridge. The original advisory covered only the Portland Harbor study area from the mouth of the Columbia River to the Fremont Bridge.

The advisory affects bass, carp, brown bullhead, black crappie and all other resident fish, as well as crayfish, clams and mussels found within the Lower Willamette River. It is illegal for non-tribal members to harvest or possess any freshwater mussels or clams, according to Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and non-tribal members who harvest or possess these shellfish can be subject to a fine by the Oregon State Police. Meal recommendations in this advisory for clams and mussels are provided for tribal use, and in the event these shellfish are harvested or possessed illegally.

“Our iconic salmon, steelhead and other migratory fish are fine,” said David Farrer, Ph.D., public health toxicologist at the OHA Public Health Division’s Environmental Public Health Section. “People still need to eat at least two meals of fish per week. We want people to know which fish are the healthiest to eat and which fish they need to be careful about.”

Resident fish live in the same area their entire life. Some, like bass, are long-lived top predators, eating other PCB-contaminated fish within the river. The longer they live, the more PCBs they accumulate. Other fish such as carp are bottom-feeders. PCBs can accumulate in these types of fish because they live and eat in areas where PCB concentrations tend to be elevated.

This advisory does not apply to migratory fish like salmon, steelhead and shad that spend most of their lives in other places beyond the Lower Willamette River, including the ocean. These and other migratory fish are considered a healthy choice when considering what fish to eat.

Advisories are issued when fish or shellfish tissue data collected and analyzed verify that the level of a contaminant—in this case, PCBs—is above Oregon’s established health-based screening value for that contaminant. Meal recommendations are then calculated using this data to help people better understand the amount of resident fish and shellfish they can safely eat in any one month. These meal recommendations are only for the portion of the Lower Willamette River described above.

Meal recommendations for resident fish and shellfish in the Lower Willamette

Fish Species

Mealsa per Month

Invertebrate Species

Mealsa per Month

Bass

0

Crayfish

2

Carp

0

Clamsc

0

Brown bullhead

0

Musselsc

7

Black crappie

2b

 

All other resident fish

0

It is illegal to harvest or possess any freshwater mussels or clams and fines could be charged.

a A meal is about the size and thickness of your or your child’s hand, or 1 ounce of uncooked fish for every 20 pounds of body weight.

b This number is for whole body consumption. If only the fillet is eaten the meal recommendation is 4.

c Meal recommendations for clams and mussels are provided in the event these shellfish are harvested or possessed illegally, and for tribal member information. Tribes have reserved treaty rights to harvest.

People who eat too much resident fish and shellfish contaminated with PCBs can suffer negative health effects over time, such as damage to organs, the nervous system and the brain, leading to potential learning and behavior problems. Mothers can pass PCBs to their babies during pregnancy or in breast milk, so fetuses, babies and small children are most vulnerable to the health effects of PCBs. OHA recommends that pregnant and nursing women, and women of childbearing age (18 to 45) follow these meal recommendations closely. Anglers also should not give resident fish or shellfish to others unless the recipients are aware of the PCB contamination issue and understand the recommendations in this and other fish and shellfish advisories.

While it is important for people to know about contaminants in fish and shellfish to protect themselves and their families, it is equally important for everyone to eat a variety of fish from a variety of sources to gain important health benefits. Fish are an important part of a healthy diet, especially migratory fish like salmon, steelhead and shad that are low in contaminants. Fish are high in protein, low in fat, and rich in nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s provide protection from heart disease and are an important brain food for adults, children and fetuses.

Consistent with other sediment clean-up sites like Portland Harbor, EPA and DEQ anticipate a temporary increase in contaminant concentrations in fish tissue once clean-up activities begin, and for some duration immediately following the clean-up phase. This is due to disturbance of contaminated sediment in the river. At that time, and until new resident fish and shellfish tissue is available, advisory meal recommendations will be updated to zero meals per month for all resident fish and shellfish species. This update will ensure the public, especially the most vulnerable populations, are as protected as possible when spikes in the amount of contaminants fish and shellfish are exposed to is predicted to occur.

Part of the Portland Harbor clean-up plan includes ongoing fish tissue sampling to monitor the recovery of the river. As the data from this monitoring becomes available, OHA will evaluate them and update the advisory meal allowances as warranted.

For a list of other areas and water bodies with existing fish advisories and recommended meal allowances, and to learn more about fish consumption and other fish-related topics, visit HealthOregon.org/fishadv to learn more.

# # #

Public Health Advisory Board meets April 19 in Portland - 04/10/18

April 10, 2018

Public Health Advisory Board meets April 19 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Receive subcommittee updates; provide feedback on CCO 2.0 policy recommendations; discuss progress toward communicable disease and immunizations objectives in Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan

When: April 19, 2-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at 4:05 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public also can attend by webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/4888122320415752707, or by telephone conference call at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for the state’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Cannabis Commission's Product Integrity Subcommittee meets April 16 in Portland - 04/09/18

April 9, 2018

Cannabis Commission's Product Integrity Subcommittee meets April 16 in Portland

What: The first monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission's Product Integrity Subcommittee

Agenda: TBD

When: April 16, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting; comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1A (on the main floor of the building), 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session though HB 2198. The commission consists of the state public health officer or the public health officer’s designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA announces public meetings to help shape the future of coordinated care - 04/09/18

April 3, 2018

OHA announces public meetings to help shape the future of coordinated care

The Oregon Health Authority will hold three meetings at the end of April to gather public input about the coordinated care model and the state’s Medicaid reforms.

Coordinated care organizations (CCOs) are the heart of the coordinated care model. CCOs were formed in Oregon in 2012 as part of the state’s plan to improve the quality of health care and limit the growth in health care spending.

“We need to hear from OHP members, taxpayers and the public about what’s working for them, and what needs more work so we can continue to transform the health system in Oregon,” said Patrick Allen, OHA’s Director. “We have more than five years of experience with the coordinated care model.  We know that it has saved taxpayers money while improving care in some areas, but we also know there is a lot more work to do,” he added.

CCOs are local organizations governed by community members. They bring together physical, mental health, addiction medicine, and dental health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid).  There are now 15 CCOs in Oregon coordinating health care for nearly 1 million OHP members throughout the state.

New CCO contracts will start in 2020, but the state is gathering public input now to help inform these contracts. There are three public meetings in April:

  • Portland – April 20, 9-11 a.m., Mercy Corps Northwest, 43 SW Naito Parkway
  • The Dalles – April 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wahtonka High School, 3601 West 10th Street
  • Woodburn – April 28, 9 a.m. to noon, Legacy Health Wellspring Conference Center, 1475 Mt. Hood Ave.

Anyone is welcome, and advance registration at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CCO-April-Meetings is appreciated.

If you can’t attend a meeting, you can also provide feedback by emailing CCO2.0@state.or.us, or by taking the CCO 2.0 online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CCO2-0, which closes April 15.

In the first five years of operation, the coordinated care model has saved taxpayers an estimated $2.2 billion, while also reducing unnecessary emergency department visits, and improving preventive care for children and adults.

But improvements are still needed in several areas including:

  • Better access and treatment in mental health and addiction medicine
  • Finding new ways to limit growth in health care spending
  • Paying providers for improving quality rather than for each visit or test
  • Providing better access to housing, transportation, education, and other health-related services
  • Reducing language and cultural barriers that affect access to health care

Spanish language interpretation services will be at the meetings. Do you need interpretation in another language? Do you have a request for accommodation? Please contact Stephanie Jarem at em@state.or.us">stephanie.jarem@state.or.us at least two days before the meeting. Every effort will be made to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

For more information, visit the CCO 2.0 webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/CCO-2-0.aspx.

# # #

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets April 9 - 04/06/18

April 6, 2018

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets April 9

What: A public meeting of the state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee; the meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #200, “Training Dental Hygienists to Place Interim Therapeutic Restorations.”

Agenda: Review project modification request; presentation from project; response from project; discuss next site visit; discuss modification of program's administrative rules

When: April 9, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public may join via conference line at 888-273-3658, participant code 76-64-09.

Background: Dental pilot projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Packaging and Labeling Rules Advisory Committee to discuss 'inhalant delivery systems' - 04/05/18

April 5, 2018

Packaging and Labeling Rules Advisory Committee to discuss 'inhalant delivery systems'

What: A public meeting of the Packaging and Labeling Rules Advisory Committee (RAC), held by the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division's Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Section

Agenda: The RAC will gather input to refine the meaning of "packaged in a manner attractive to minors" regarding inhalant delivery systems (also known as e-cigarettes).

When: April 27, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland

Background: Oregon Revised Statute 431A.175 states that it is unlawful to distribute, sell or allow to be sold an inhalant delivery system (such as an e-cigarette) that is packaged in a manner that is attractive to minors. The Oregon Health Authority will gather input via a Rules Advisory Committee to refine the meaning of "packaged in a manner attractive to minors" as used in Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR) 333-015-0300 to 333-015-0375.

Program contact: Tara Weston, a.e.weston@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.e.weston@dhsoha.state.or.us, 971-673-0984.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Barnard at 971-673-1347, 711 TTY or ah.barnard@state.or.us">sarah.barnard@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Today: Group to read HCR 33, discuss effects of traumatic events on children, adults - 04/05/18

April 5, 2018

Today: Group to read HCR 33, discuss effects of traumatic events on children, adults

What: A group of state officials and health advocates will do a public reading of House Concurrent Resolution 33, passed by the Oregon Legislature in 2017. The bill calls on state agencies including the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to become informed on the effects that emotional neglect and exposure to trauma and toxic stress can have on children, adults and later generations. The group also will discuss what agencies are doing to apply evidence-based, trauma-informed care practices, tools and interventions that promote healing and resiliency in children, adults and communities.

The HCR 33 reading is part of Oregon Public Health Week, April 2-6. A full schedule of events is available at on the OHA Public Health Week webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/SPOTLIGHT/Documents/phweek-2018.pdf.

When: Noon to 1 p.m. TODAY, Thursday, April 5

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B (main floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. A conference line is available at 877-873-8017, code 767068#.

Who: Participants include:

  • State Sen. Kathleen Taylor
  • Mandy Davis, Trauma Informed Oregon
  • Royce Bowlin, OHA Health Policy and Analytics Division
  • Claire Ranit, Resilience Network of the Gorge

For more information:

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christy Hudson at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or christy.j.hudson@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

News release: http://bit.ly/2IuXZ9B

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets April 9 by webinar - 04/02/18

April 2, 2018

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets April 9 by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Incentives and Funding Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Approve March 12 meeting minutes; discuss incentives and matching funds components of the funding formula; discuss funding formula indicators

When: Monday, April 9, 1-3 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: By webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1017967828287751171. By conference call at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops recommendations for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

News release: http://bit.ly/2pZ8X0u

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Health Policy Board meets April 3 in Portland - 03/27/18

March 27, 2018

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board

When: Tuesday, April 3, 8:30 a.m. to noon

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, 3303 SW Bond Ave, 3rd floor Rm. #4, Portland

Members of the public can call in to listen at 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: Welcome; minutes approval; long-term calendar review; OHA Director’s report; OHPB committee liaison and consultant report; Healthcare Workforce Committee: Report on Healthcare Provider Incentive Program, CCO 2.0 development, opioid crisis discussion

For more information on the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

·    Sign language and spoken language interpreters
·    Written materials in other languages
·    Braille
·    Large print
·    Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, jeffrey.scroggin@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

OHA releases hospital community benefit report - 03/27/18

March 27, 2018

*Oregon hospitals provided $2.2 billion in community benefit in 2016*

Oregon hospitals reported a notable increase in the amount of community benefit they provided in 2016. Their community benefit costs increased nearly 14 percent from fiscal year 2015 to 2016, mostly due to unreimbursed Medicare and Medicaid costs.

Unreimbursed Medicare costs grew to $866 million in 2016, up from $709 million in 2015. Unreimbursed Medicaid costs grew to $738 million from $655 million the previous year. Hospitals incur these costs when Medicaid or Medicare denies payment or reimburses the hospital less than the cost of providing the care.

Charity care, or care that is provided free or at a reduced cost to eligible patients, has fallen sharply since the Affordable Care Act made health coverage available to more Oregonians. Today, only 6 percent of Oregonians lack health insurance. In 2016 hospitals provided about $150 million in charity care, down 5 percent from 2015.

This report is compiled from information provided by Oregon's 60 acute care hospitals that are subject to reporting requirements for community benefit. However, McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center in Springfield and Willamette Valley Medical Center in McMinnville are for-profit hospitals and therefore have no obligation to provide community benefit because they are subject to property and income taxes.

The report is available on the Oregon Health Authority website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/HospitalReporting/Community-Benefit-Report-FY-2016.pdf. More information is available on the OHA Hospital Reporting Program webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Hospital-Reporting.aspx.

# # #

Evite comprar pollitos cuando llegue la primavera y la Pascua - 03/27/18

27 de marzo del 2018

*Las aves de corral pueden portar la peligrosa bacteria llamada Salmonella*

Al acercarse la Pascua con la llegada de la primavera, algunas personas compran pollitos para regalar, pero los expertos en enfermedades infecciosas de la Autoridad de Salud de Oregón advierten contra esta práctica porque estas aves lindas y borrosas pueden portar la bacteria Salmonella.

Dicen que, debido a su tamaño y ternura, los niños a menudo recogen a los pollitos, los mantienen cerca de sus rostros e incluso los besan. Y los niños a menudo no se lavan las manos correctamente después de tocar a los polluelos.

"Sabemos que los pollos, patos y otras aves de corral adultas son portadores de la bacteria Salmonella, lo que significa que sus descendientes también pueden transmitirla", Emilio DeBess, DVM, veterinario estatal de salud en la Sección de Prevención de Enfermedades Agudas y Contagiosa de la Autoridad de Salud de Oregón.

Desde 2010, se han producido once (11) brotes de enfermedades causadas por la bacteria Salmonella en pollitos en Oregón, que afectan al menos a 72 casos de salmonelosis. Cuarenta y tres por ciento (43%) de los casos eran niños, dijo DeBess. El último gran brote de salmonelosis, en 2017, ocurrió después de que las personas manipularan, besaran y mantuvieran a las aves de corral dentro de la casa.

Las infecciones de Salmonella pueden causar diarrea, calambres abdominales y síntomas de fiebre que duran de tres a siete días, dijo DeBess. Cualquier persona con un sistema inmune comprometido, las personas muy jóvenes y mayores podrían enfermarse y morir de la infección.

"Los pollitos no son regalos de Pascua apropiados", dijo DeBess. "Los niños menores de 5 años pueden enfermarse gravemente debido a la contaminación por Salmonella porque su sistema inmunológico a esa edad no está completamente desarrollado".

Muchas personas que compran aves de corral tampoco se dan cuenta de la responsabilidad que implica criar polluelos y patitos a medida que los animales crecen. Las aves requieren espacio para vagar y comida para comer, lo que puede ser costoso. Como resultado, a menudo son abandonados después de convertirse en pollos y patos adultos.

Consejos para prevenir la infección por Salmonella en pollos pequeños:

-- No les regale pollitos a los niños. En cambio, de animales de peluche.

-- Lávese siempre las manos con agua y jabón, y limpie bien las superficies después de tocar cualquier animal o de entrar en contacto con desechos de animales.

-- Mantenga a los polluelos en un área al aire libre apropiada.

-- Si se tocan los polluelos, nunca los acaricie ni los bese.

-- Nunca permita aves de corral dentro de la casa.

Para obtener más información acerca de las aves bebés y la salmonela, visite http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/Pages/FS-Baby-birds-and-Salmonella.aspx

Información Adicional:

-- Bioseguridad para las aves (USDA): http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov/

-- Mantenimiento de aves de corral en el patio trasero: http://www.cdc.gov/features/salmonellapoultry/

-- Riesgo de infecciones humanas por Salmonella en pollos vivos: http://www.cdc.gov/Features/SalmonellaBabyBirds/

-- Enfermedades gastrointestinales (entéricas) de animales (CDC): http://www.cdc.gov/zoonotic/gi/

-- Publicaciones y materiales de CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/publications/index.html

# # #

Avoid buying baby chicks as spring and Easter arrive - 03/27/18

March 27, 2018

*Baby poultry can spread dangerous Salmonella bacteria*

As Easter approaches with the arrival of spring, some people buy baby chicks to give as gifts, but Oregon Health Authority infectious disease experts caution against this practice because these cute, fuzzy birds can carry Salmonella bacteria.

They say that because of their size and cuteness, children often pick up the baby birds, hold them close to their faces and even kiss them. And children often don't wash their hands after handling the chicks.

"We know that adult chickens, ducks and other live poultry carry Salmonella bacteria, and that means their offspring can carry it as well," says Emilio DeBess, DVM, state public health veterinarian in the Oregon Health Authority's Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention Section.

Since 2010, 11 outbreaks of illnesses caused by Salmonella bacteria from baby chicks have occurred in Oregon, affecting at least 72 cases of salmonellosis. Forty-three percent of the cases were children, DeBess said. The last major salmonellosis outbreak, in 2017, occurred after people handled, kissed and kept poultry inside the home.

Salmonella infections can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever symptoms lasting three to seven days, DeBess said. Anyone with compromised immune systems, the very young and elderly people could become very ill and die of the infection.

"Baby chicks really are not appropriate Easter gifts," DeBess said. "Children younger than 5 can get very sick from Salmonella contamination because their immune systems at that age are not fully developed."

Many people purchasing baby poultry also don't realize the responsibility involved with raising chicks and ducklings as the animals grow up. The birds require space to roam and food to eat, which can get expensive. As a result, they often are abandoned after they become adult chickens and ducks.

Tips for preventing Salmonella infection from baby poultry:

-- Don't give live baby birds to children. Instead, give stuffed animals.

-- Always wash hands with soap and water, and thoroughly clean surfaces after handling any animal or coming in contact with animal waste.

-- Keep chicks in an appropriate outdoor area.

-- If chicks are handled, never nuzzle or kiss them.

-- Never allow poultry inside the home.

For more information about baby birds and Salmonella, visit the OHA Salmonella webpage at http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/Pages/FS-Baby-birds-and-Salmonella.aspx.

Additional information:

-- Biosecurity for Birds (USDA): https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-disease-information/avian-influenza-disease/birdbiosecurity

-- Keeping Backyard Poultry: http://www.cdc.gov/features/salmonellapoultry/

-- Gastrointestinal (Enteric) Diseases from Animals (CDC): http://www.cdc.gov/zoonotic/gi/

-- CDC publications and materials: http://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/publications/index.html

# # #

Allen announces new responsibilities for two OHA leaders - 03/27/18

March 27, 2018

Salem, Ore.--Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen has made two changes to the OHA leadership team. Kristine Kautz will become deputy director and Dawn Jagger will become chief of staff.

"As deputy director, Kris will represent the agency in inter-agency processes, planning, and discussions," Allen said. "In addition, she will continue to oversee the functions and operations she has been responsible for as chief operating officer. In her short time at OHA, Kris has proven that she has the skills and expertise we need in this role."

Kautz came to OHA from the Oregon Department of Revenue, where she served as deputy director. She is a long-time senior executive in state government, having worked at five state agencies prior to OHA, including the Department of Administrative Services.

Jagger previously served as interim External Relations Divisions director at OHA since September.

"Her leadership has been integral to our efforts to rebuild trust with legislators and health system partners," Allen said. "As chief of staff, she'll continue to foster greater transparency, align work across OHA to advance our health transformation goals, and provide strategic counsel to me and the OHA leadership team. In addition, she will continue to lead the external relations teams."

Jagger came to OHA from the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS), where she was senior health policy and communications adviser. She has previously worked as a federal policy liaison for the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, an enforcement officer in the Insurance Division at DCBS, a judicial law clerk for Lane County Circuit Court Judge Karsten H. Rasmussen.

# # #

Oregon Public Health Week 2018 focuses on health equity - 03/27/18

March 27, 2018

What: Oregon Public Health Week, a weeklong series of events organized by the state's public health partners as part of National Public Health Week to promote continuing health and wellness for all Oregonians. The 2018 series of events is focused on health equity and cultural responsiveness, one of the seven foundational capabilities of Oregon's public health modernization initiative, http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/About/TaskForce/Pages/index.aspx. All events are free and open to the public.

When: Monday through Friday, April 2-6.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland, first floor conference rooms; some events will be live-streamed. The full schedule is available on the Oregon Health Authority website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/SPOTLIGHT.

Schedule:

Monday, April 2:

-- 10-11 a.m.--Work Equity: Successes and Challenges at Multnomah County, Room 1A, or live-stream at bit.ly/BenDuncan

-- 11 a.m. to noon--Health Equity Work Group (HEWG Part 1: Where Do We Start? Assessing Health Equity in Your Program or Section, Room 1B

-- Noon to 1 p.m.--Exercise Group: Yoga, Room 1D

-- Noon to 1 p.m.--People of Color Employee Resource Group open house, Room 1B

-- 1-2 p.m.--Environment, Economy, and Equity: The Three E's of Sustainability and Public Health's Role, Room 1A

-- 2-3 p.m.--Framework for the Social Determinants of Health: A Facilitated Conversation about What Affects our Health, Room 1B

-- 3-4 p.m.--Film Festival, Room 1E

Tuesday, April 3:

-- 9-10 a.m.--HEWG Part 2: Now What? Developing and Implementing a Plan for Equity, Room 1E

-- 9-10:30 a.m.--Search for Equity Scavenger Hunt, lobby

-- 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.--Equity Partner Café: Coffee, connections and chats, Oh my!, Room 1E

-- Noon to 1 p.m.--Exercise Group: Yoga, Room 1D

-- 1-2 p.m.--Gender Identity and Adolescent Health in Oregon, Room 1E

-- 2-3:30 p.m.--Safer Space: A Front Line Harm Reduction Intervention, Room 1D or live-stream at bit.ly/everywherebutsafe

Wednesday, April 4:

-- 10-11 a.m.--Oral Health and Equity: Progress and Challenges, Room 1D

-- 11-11:30 a.m.--Exercise Group: Balance Session, Room 1E

-- Noon to 1 p.m.--Exercise Group: Yoga, Room 1E

-- Noon to 1:30 p.m.--Diversifying the Public Health Workforce: A dynamic panel discussion, Room 1D or live-stream at bit.ly/DiversifyPH

-- 2-3 p.m.--HEWG Part 3: Environmental Health Equity Panel, Room 1D

-- 2-4 p.m.--PHD Poster Round?Up and Cultural Snack?off, Room 1B

Thursday, April 5:

-- 10-11 a.m.--Creating Equity in the Workplace for Persons with Disabilities, Room 1D

-- 11 a.m. to noon--Public Health PHed Talks, Room 1B or live-stream bit.ly/PHedtalks

-- Noon to 1 p.m.--Exercise Group: Yoga, Room 1E

-- Noon to 1 p.m. -- Trauma-Informed State Agencies: A Public Reading of House Concurrent Resolution 33, Room 1D

-- 1-2 p.m.--From Policy to Practice: Increasing Health Care Access for Immigrant Communities in Oregon, Room 1B or live-stream at bit.ly/Policytopractice

-- 2-4 p.m.--Film Festival, Room 1E

Friday, April 6:

-- 9-10 a.m.--HEWG Part 4: Establishing and Sustaining a Health Equity Work Group -- Collaborative Learning, Room 1D

-- Noon to 2 p.m.--Someone You Love: The HPV Epidemic, Room 1B

-- 1-3 p.m.--Film Festival, Room 1A

-- 1-5 p.m.--Health Equity Story Sessions

Background: National Public Health Week is an annual event that celebrates the power of prevention, advocates for healthy and fair policies, shares strategies for successful partnerships, and champions the role of a strong public health system. For information, visit the public health week website at http://www.nphw.org/.

For more information about Oregon Public Health Modernization, visit the Oregon Public Health website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/About/TaskForce/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets April 12 in Portland - 03/26/18

March 26, 2018

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee

Agenda: Approval of minutes; committee membership update; bylaws revisions; state EMS and Trauma program updates; Oregon Psychiatric Access Line About Kids and extension for community healthcare outcomes; mobile integrated healthcare; EMSC Program updates; Pediatric Readiness Quality Collaborative; sleep safety; committee member roundtable; public comments

When: April 12, 9 a.m. to noon. The meeting is open to the public. The public may also attend by conference call at 877-336-1831, participant code 640551.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the committee's webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PROVIDERPARTNERRESOURCES/EMSTRAUMASYSTEMS/EMSFORCHILDREN/Pages/Committee.aspx.

Program contact: Rachel Ford, 971-673-0564, rachel.l.ford@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
* Sign language and spoken language interpreters
* Written materials in other languages
* Braille
* Large print
* Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Rachel Ford at 971-673-0564, 711 TTY or rachel.l.ford@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Area Trauma Advisory Board, Region 2, meets April 19 - 03/23/18

March 23, 2018

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Area Trauma Advisory Board (ATAB), Region 2. Agenda items include ATAB Trauma Plan and Stop the Bleed initiative.

When: April 19, 6-9 p.m.

Where: Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 NW Samaritan Dr., Corvallis. The public also may attend the meeting by conference call. For more information, contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322 or stella.m.rausch-scott@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Who: The ATAB is established under ORS 431 for achieving continuous improvement in the quality of trauma care in Oregon. The committee is made of 17 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
· Sign language and spoken language interpreters
· Written material in other languages
· Braille
· Large print
· Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or stella.m.rausch-scott@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Area Trauma Advisory Board, Region 6, meets April 17 - 03/23/18

March 23, 2018

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Area Trauma Advisory Board (ATAB), Region 6. Agenda items include ATAB Trauma Plan and Stop the Bleed initiative.

When: April 17, 3-5 p.m.

Where: Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital, 811 13th St., Hood River. The public also may attend the meeting by conference call. For more information, contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322 or stella.m.rausch-scott@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Who: The ATAB is established under ORS 431 for achieving continuous improvement in the quality of trauma care in Oregon. The committee is made of 17 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
· Sign language and spoken language interpreters
· Written material in other languages
· Braille
· Large print
· Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or stella.m.rausch-scott@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.