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News Releases
Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets February 20 - 02/15/19

February 15, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets February 20

What: The second public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Review themes from the January meeting; review opportunities, barriers and resources identified at the November 6, 2018, kickoff meeting; discuss options for focus of workgroup.

When: February 20, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets February 14 in Portland - 02/12/19

February 12, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets February 14 in Portland

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: February 14, 2-4 p.m.

Where: 421 SW Oak St, Suite 850 Abraham Room, Portland. Attendees can also join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2239280069326082306 and conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

Agenda: Introduction and meeting goals; general updates; 2020 administrative rule final edits; discuss changes to memo accompanying rule (Discussion Document #5); timeline for administrative rule changes; public comment.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Conference of Local Health Officials meets February 21 in Portland and Salem - 02/12/19

February 12, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets February 21 in Portland and Salem

What: The monthly public conference meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO).

Agenda: Local health officer back-up coverage; 2018 Public Health Modernization progress report planning; 2019-21 Local Public Health Authority Intergovernmental Agreement proposed language changes; Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division updates; Draft 2019 Public Health Accountability Metrics Report; School-Based Health Centers Program Element; Maternal and Child Health Program Element; public health emergency preparedness federal funding application letter of concurrence; CLHO committee appointments.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the Conference of Local Health Officials website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

When: Feb. 21, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland; and Local Government Center, 1201 Court Street NE, Salem.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meets February 14 in Wilsonville - 02/12/19

February 12, 2019

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee.

When: February 14, 1-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center, Loop E., Wilsonville. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5441985918617611266 and listen-only conference line at 877-336-1828, access code 9657836.

Agenda: Welcome, general updates; public testimony 1:15-1:25; Health Equity Measurement Workgroup presentation; measure structure and prioritization recommendations; preview of 2020 aligned measure set; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

http://bit.ly/2GFjCGQ

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets February 15 in Portland - 02/11/19

February 11, 2019

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: February 15, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly Lincoln) Suite 775 Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3895887851300669185 and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; public testimony 9:15-9:25; equity measure proposal for 2020; quality: how measurement is key; review program structure; individual measure review (SBIRT; Initiation and engagement in drug/alcohol treatment; PCPCH; postpartum care; adolescent well-care visits); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

http://bit.ly/2TJM1iF

Get immunizations updated before School Exclusion Day on Feb. 20 - 02/07/19

Spanish version here

Russian version here

February 7, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Get immunizations updated before School Exclusion Day on Feb. 20

Parents must provide schools, child care facilities with kids’ vaccine records

Portland, Ore. – Feb. 20 is School Exclusion Day, and the Oregon Immunization Program is reminding parents that children will not be able to attend school or child care starting that day if their records on file show missing immunizations.

Under state law, all children in public and private schools, preschools, Head Start and certified child care facilities must have up-to-date documentation on their immunizations, or have an exemption.

"This year’s School Exclusion Day reminder has taken on added urgency as the Pacific Northwest confronts the worst preventable measles outbreak in more than two decades," said Stacy de Assis Matthews, school law coordinator in the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division. "Immunizations are the most effective way to stop the spread of measles and other communicable diseases that put children and others at risk."

If school and child care vaccination records are not up-to-date on Feb. 20, the child will be sent home. In 2018 local health departments sent 24,725 letters to parents and guardians informing them that their children needed immunizations to stay in school or child care. A total of 4,349 children were kept out of school or child care until the necessary immunization information was turned in to the schools or child care facilities. This year letters to parents were mailed on or before Feb. 6.

Parents seeking immunizations for their children should contact their health care provider or local health department, or call 211Info—just dial 211 or go to 211info.org. No one can be turned away from a local health department because of the inability to pay for required vaccines. Many pharmacists can immunize children 7 and older; contact your neighborhood pharmacy for details.

Additional information on school immunizations can be found at the Immunization Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/imm. Follow the Oregon Immunization Program on Facebook.

See this video for more information about School Exclusion Day.

# # #

Additional Multnomah County residents test positive for measles; brings Oregon total to 4 - 02/06/19

Editors: Multnomah County Deputy Health Officer Jennifer Vines and OHA public health physician Ann Thomas are available to media Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. Call Kate Willson or Delia Hernández to schedule interviews.

February 6, 2019

Media contacts: Delia Hernández, Oregon Health Authority, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Kate Willson, Multnomah County, 503-410-4524, kate.willson@multco.us,

Additional Multnomah County residents test positive for measles; brings Oregon total to 4

Sick individuals stayed home, pose no risk of new public exposures

PORTLAND, Ore.—Measles was confirmed in three more Multnomah County residents Wednesday, but officials say they pose no risk to the public. Track Oregon’s cases here.

The individuals were in close contact with a Multnomah County resident who tested positive for measles Jan. 25. The individuals have remained at home and in regular contact with the Multnomah County Communicable Disease Services team.

Health officials have worked with the individuals to track progression of their symptoms, which typically include a cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by fever and, eventually, a rash that begins around the hairline and spreads to the rest of the body.

The county’s Communicable Disease Services team checks daily on affected individuals – who have been asked to stay home while experiencing symptoms to avoid spreading the virus – to check on their illness and see if they need medical care. If an individual needs to see a health care provider, officials help them develop a plan to get care without exposing other people.

Health officials also help people find ways to continue their daily routines without creating new exposures. That can include attending church via video feed, helping employers understand why an employee needs time away from work and making sure kids stay caught up with homework.

"These individuals did everything right," said Jennifer Vines, M.D., Multnomah County deputy health officer. "They stayed away from others while on symptom watch so we have no new public exposures to measles."

The first Multnomah County resident who tested positive Jan. 25 was in contact with someone from Clark County, Wash., who was contagious with measles. These cases are part of a larger outbreak in Clark County, where health officials are investigating 49 cases of measles, with one additional case in King County, Wash.

The threat of measles appears to have increased interest in vaccination; in the last week of January, the number of measles vaccines given out in the Tri-County area (Multnomah, Clackamas, Washington counties) tripled compared with the same time last year, from 200 per day in January 2018 to 600 per day in 2019.

"This outbreak has put people at real risk," said Ann Thomas, public health physician at the Oregon Health Authority. "It has also raised an awareness that measles could easily make a comeback, and the only way to prevent that is to get as many people vaccinated as possible."

About measles

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air after a person with measles coughs or sneezes. People are contagious with measles for four days before the rash appears and up to four days after the rash appears. The virus can also linger in the air for up to two hours after someone who is infectious has left.

Measles poses the highest risk to unvaccinated pregnant women, infants under 12 months of age, and people with weakened immune systems.

After someone contracts measles, illness develops in about two weeks, but people can be contagious days before they know they’re sick.

The symptoms of measles start with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that usually begins on the face and spreads to the rest of the body. Common complications of measles include ear infection, lung infection, and diarrhea. Swelling of the brain is a rare but much more serious complication.

A person is considered immune to measles if any of the following apply:

  • You were born before 1957.
  • A physician diagnosed you with measles in the past.
  • A blood test proves that you are immune.
  • You have been fully vaccinated against measles (one dose for children 12 months through 3 years old, two doses in anyone 4 years and older).

# # #

Report shows range in primary care spending across public, private health insurance plans - 02/06/19

Feb. 6, 2019

Contacts: Allyson Hagen, OHA, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Brad Hilliard, DCBS, 503-798-6376, rad.Hilliard@oregon.gov">brad.hilliard@oregon.gov

Report shows range in primary care spending across public, private health insurance plans

SALEM, Ore. -- A joint report from the Oregon Health Authority and Department of Consumer and Business Services shows that in 2017 Oregon’s public and private health insurance plans’ spending on primary care averaged from 10.6 to 16.5 percent of their medical expenditures. Coordinated care organizations (CCOs) spent the highest percentage of their medical spending on primary care.

Senate Bill 934, passed in 2017, requires health insurance carriers and CCOs to allocate at least 12 percent of their health care expenditures to primary care by 2023. Research indicates that availability of primary care providers is associated with improved health outcomes including reduced mortality rates, reduced rates of low birth weight and preventable hospitalizations, and increased self-rated health status.

"Primary care serves as the front line of Oregon’s health care system," said Dana Hargunani, OHA’s chief medical officer. "The report helps us better understand the investments that are being directed to primary care services and shows that CCOs are currently leading the way in this area."

Findings from the report include:

  • Coordinated Care Organizations spent the highest percentage (16.5 percent) of their medical spending on primary care.
  • Large commercial carriers spent an average of 13.4 percent of their medical spending on primary care.
  • PEBB and OEBB spent an average of 12.2 percent of their medical spending on primary care.
  • Medicare Advantage plans spent an average 10.6 percent of their medical spending on primary care.
  • Commercial plans, CCOs, Medicare Advantage plans, and PEBB and OEBB plans spent $1.5 billion on primary care out of $11 billion in total spending.

The report also includes information about the percent of primary care spending that was not fee-for-service based, which includes: incentive payments, payments for programs recognized as providing good clinical care, and payments to help providers adopt health information technology such as electronic medical records.

The report’s methodology of primary care spending has been updated to more accurately reflect primary care spending and cannot be compared to previous versions of the report.

The full report is available on the OHA website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Documents/SB-231-Report-2019.pdf.

# # #

Heath Equity Measurement Workgroup to meet February 6 by phone - 02/06/19

February 6, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kristin Tehrani, 971-304-6236, istin.tehrani@dhsoha.state.or.us">kristin.tehrani@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Heath Equity Measurement Workgroup to meet February 6 by phone

What: A public teleconference of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Equity Measurement Workgroup.

When: Thursday, February 7, 1-2 p.m.

Where: By telephone. The public can join remotely through a conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

Agenda: Report on Feb. 5 OHPB meeting; prepare for Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meeting Feb. 13.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Health-Equity-Measurement-Workgroup.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kristin Tehrani, 971-304-6236, istin.tehrani@dhsoha.state.or.us">kristin.tehrani@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets February 12 by webinar - 02/04/19

February 4, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets February 12 by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board's Incentives and Funding Subcommittee.

Agenda: Approve January 8 meeting minutes; make recommendations for use of a continued $5 million investment in 2019-21; begin discussion on use of additional funding for 2019-21.

When: February 12, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: By webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3531740595390230274. By conference call at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops recommendations for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets February 13 by webinar - 02/04/19

February 4, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets February 13 by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve March 8, May 23, and Jan. 7 meeting minutes; review 2019 accountability metrics data; discuss upcoming opportunity to meet with Metrics and Scoring.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 13, noon to 1 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: By webinar at  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5150607625475124481. By conference call at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA receives 24 letters of intent for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts - 02/04/19

February 4, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us

OHA receives 24 letters of intent for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts

The Oregon Health Authority has received 24 letters of intent from organizations seeking to apply for 2020-2024 coordinated care organization (CCO) contracts. Based on the letters of intent, Oregon Health Plan members in every county in Oregon would have at least one CCO to coordinate their health care. In many parts of the state, multiple organizations filed letters of intent to operate in the same counties, giving Oregon Health Plan members more than one CCO choice.

Complete applications will be due to OHA April 22. Only organizations that submitted letters of intent may submit applications in April. An organization submitting a letter of intent is not obliged to follow with a complete application. Awards for the CCO contracts are expected to be announced in July.


"The number of responses we received shows the CCO market is strong and thriving," said Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen. "It also shows Oregon’s health care community is eager to join us in taking Oregon’s innovative health transformation to the next level and making health care better and more affordable in our state."

Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures. Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs.


In October the Oregon Health Policy Board approved a comprehensive set of policies to improve the health of Oregon Health Plan members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state.

These policy priorities will be written into the 2020-2024 CCO contracts, which represent the next phase of health care transformation is known as "CCO 2.0." The new contracts with CCOs represent the largest procurement in state history, totaling more than $5 billion for the 2020 contract year.

Letters of intent received by the Oregon Health Authority for CCO 2.0 contracts

Organization

Service Area

AllCare CCO, Inc.

Josephine, Jackson, Curry and partial Douglas

CareOregon, Inc.

Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington

Cascade Health Alliance

partial Klamath

Columbia Pacific CCO, LLC

Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook

Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization, LLC

Baker, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, Wheeler

Health Share of Oregon

Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington

InterCommunity Health Network

Linn, Benton, Lincoln

Jackson County CCO

Jackson

Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest

Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington

Marion Polk Coordinated Care

Marion, Polk and partial Benton, Linn, Clackamas and Yamhill

Moda Health Plan, Inc.

Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook

Moda Health Plan, Inc.

Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington

Moda Health Plan, Inc.

Lane

PacificSource Community Solutions - Central Oregon

Deschutes, Jefferson, Crook, partial Klamath

PacificSource Community Solutions - Columbia Gorge

Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler

PacificSource Community Solutions - Lane

Lane

PacificSource Community Solutions - Marion Polk

Marion and Polk

PacificSource Community Solutions - Portland

Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington

PrimaryHealth of Josephine County

Josephine, Jackson and partial Douglas

Providence Health Assurance

Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas, Hood River, Clatsop, Jackson

Trillium Community Health Plan, Inc.

Lane, partial in Benton, Linn, Coos and Douglas

Umpqua Health Alliance, LLC

Douglas and Lane

Western Oregon Advanced Health, LLC

Coos and Curry

Yamhill County Care Organization

Yamhill and partial Clackamas, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Washington

OHA will continue to provide updated information about the CCO 2.0 RFA process on the CCO 2.0 page on the OHA website.

# # #

Oregon Health Policy Board meets February 5 in Portland - 02/01/19

February 1, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Health Policy Board meets February 5 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: February 5, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St, Portland.

Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; minutes approval; liaison updates; OHA report; Health Equity Measurement progress report; cost benchmark next steps; legislative update; public testimony; health information technology update; committees of the board liaison next steps.

For more information on the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, ey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us">jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Two medical marijuana audit results align, requiring state law change - 01/30/19

January 30, 2019

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Two medical marijuana audit results align, requiring state law change

Secretary of State recommendations mirror 2018 OHA internal study findings

PORTLAND, Ore.—Officials at the Oregon Health Authority agree with a Secretary of State audit that found the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program needs improvements to ensure grow sites comply with reporting requirements.

Health officials also accept changes auditors recommended at the Oregon Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program to ensure cannabis testing labs meet national quality assurance standards.

Auditor findings for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program were consistent with findings of an internal review OHA conducted last year and submitted to the Oregon Cannabis Commission in May 2018.

In a Jan. 25 response, OHA Director Patrick Allen said the agency agrees with the audit’s recommendations. Allen noted that some recommendations fall outside the scope of OHA’s statutory authority. Director Allen said, “OMMP needs changes in state law that give the program needed authority and reporting ability to comply with many of these recommendations.”

The May 2018 report, an internal review of the OMMP, identified administrative shortcomings that enabled growers, dispensaries and laboratories to operate without effective oversight. It also found that statutory restrictions limited the OMMP’s ability to answer information requests from local law enforcement officials, even as the program protects patient confidentiality.

The issues heightened the risk for medical marijuana to be diverted from patients, who rely on cannabis to treat medical conditions, into the black market. The report can be viewed at http://healthoregon.org/ommp.

###

PartnerSHIP meets February 12 in Portland - 01/28/19

January 28, 2019

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

PartnerSHIP meets February 12 in Portland

What: The third meeting of PartnerSHIP, tasked with developing the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP).

Agenda: Review feedback from communities about the strategic issues; identify final priorities for the 2020-2024 SHIP; determine framework for the SHIP; organize for subcommittee process.

When: Feb. 12, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A 10-minute public comment period will be held at about 12:15 p.m. Comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public can also join via webinar at  https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/945833933.

Background: Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath in Oregon. The SHIP will be based on findings from the State Health Assessment.

  • Health departments develop and implement a health improvement plan at least once every five years.
  • The Public Health Division is using the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) framework, widely used by coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and local health departments. The MAPP framework uses six phases. The SHA is developed over the first three phases, while the SHIP is developed and implemented over the second three phases.
  • Information about the PartnerSHIP can be found on the OHA website at http://www.healthoregon.org/2020ship.
  • The current State Health Improvement Plan identifies seven priorities related to tobacco use, obesity, oral health, immunizations, suicide, communicable disease, and substance use. The plan is in effect through December 2019.

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, christy.j.hudson@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, 711 TTY, or christy.j.hudson@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Correction: OHA Press Release sent 1/26/19 1:22 pm PST - 01/26/19

Dear Media Outlets,

A press release translated into Russian from Oregon Health Authority was issued from FlashAlert in error at 1:22pm on 1/26/2019. The press release was supposed to be posted to our website here: bit.ly/2S7q5jW. We also have the release available in English: bit.ly/2sIYA1M and Spanish: bit.ly/2HA9OQj as part of our continued efforts to make important information available in more languages.

Caso de sarampión confirmado en el Condado Multnomah vinculado al brote en el estado de Washington - 01/25/19

25 de enero, 2019

Contacto para medios:

Delia Hernandez, OHA, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Kate Willson, Multnomah County, 503-410-4524, kate.willson@multco.us

Caso de sarampión confirmado en el Condado Multnomah vinculado al brote en el estado de Washington

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA, por sus siglas en inglés) ha confirmado un caso de sarampión en un residente del Condado Multnomah. La agencia trabaja con el Condado Multnomah, y otras agencias en Oregon y Washington para notificar a individuos de su exposición potencial y ayudarles a tomar pasos para prevenir exponer a otros, si llegan a enfermarse.

No se han identificado casos adicionales de sarampión en Oregon.

La Salud Publica del Condado Clark ha reportado 30 casos confirmados en Vancouver. Para seguir su investigación, y una lista completa de exposiciones, visite su página de investigación del sarampión.

La mayoría de los residentes de Oregon han sido vacunados contra el sarampión, y su riesgo es bajo. El riesgo puede ser más alto para personas que no se han vacunado y estuvieron en contacto personas infectadas con el sarampión en estos nuevos sitios de exposición:

Encuentren una lista completa de sitios de exposiciones en Oregon aquí:

https://multco.us/health-officer/measles-outbreak-winter-2019-oregon-exposures

A quien llamar

Oficiales de salud de Oregon piden a las personas evitar ir inmediatamente una clínica o centro de salud médico, si:

  1. No son inmunes Y
  2. Han sido expuestos Y
  3. Tiene síntomas.

Se recomienda primero llamar a su proveedor de salud o centro médico por teléfono, para crear un plan de ingreso y evitar exponer a otros en las salas de espera.

OHA ha establecido un centro de llamadas para preguntas relacionadas al sarampión. Cualquiera que tenga preguntas sobre exposiciones publicas debe llamar al 211. Las horas para el centro de llamadas son de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. diariamente, incluyendo fines de semana.

Cualquiera que tenga preguntas sobre la infección del sarampión o la vacuna contra el sarampión debe llamar a su proveedor de salud o la agencia de salud en su condado. Para más información sobre el sarampión para el público, por favor visite la página web de OHA sobre el sarampión o llame a las agencia de salud pública en los siguientes condados:

  • Multnomah County Public Health: 503-988-3406
  • Clark County Public Health: 360-397-8021
  • Washington County Public Health: 503-846-3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health: 503-655-8411
  • Marion County Public Health Division: 503-588-5621

Sobre el sarampión

El sarampión representa el riesgo más alto a mujeres embarazadas, infantes menores de 12 meses de edad y personas con sistemas inmunes frágiles.

El sarampión generalmente comienza con fiebre, tos, moqueo y ojos enrojecidos, seguido por un sarpullido que normalmente comienza en el rostro y se extiende hacia otras partes del cuerpo.

Las complicaciones comunes por el sarampión incluyen infecciones de oído, infección de los pulmones y diarrea. Inflamación del cerebro es poco común pero una complicación más grave.

Después de que alguien ha sido expuesto, la enfermedad se desarrolla en unas dos semanas, algunas veces el periodo es más largo.

El sarampión es una enfermedad viral sumamente contagiosa que se transmite fácilmente a personas que no son inmunes. Se transmite por el aire después de que una persona con sarampión tóese o estornuda. Las personas infectadas pueden transmitir el sarampión a los demás desde cuatro días antes de que aparezca el sarpullido(https://www.cdc.gov/measles/about/signs-symptoms.html) hasta cuatro días después de su manifestación.

Personas con sarampión pueden transmitir el virus a otros antes de que desarrollen la erupción en la piel o sarpullido. El virus puede también mantenerse en el aire por minutos a horas después de que alguien que se encuentra en etapa infecciosa se ha ido del lugar.

Una persona es considerada inmune al sarampión si cualquiera de los siguientes aplica:

  1. Usted nació antes de 1957.
  2. Su doctor lo ha diagnosticado con sarampión.
  3. Un análisis de sangre demuestra que es inmune.
  4. Usted ha sido completamente vacunado contra el sarampión (dos dosis para niños, estudiantes universitarios y profesionales de salud; una dosis para la mayoría de otros adultos).

###

Confirmed case of measles in Multnomah County linked to Washington state outbreak - 01/25/19

January 25, 2019

Media contacts:

Delia Hernandez, OHA, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Kate Willson, Multnomah County, 503-410-4524, kate.willson@multco.us

Confirmed case of measles in Multnomah County linked to Washington state outbreak

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority has confirmed a case of measles in a resident of Multnomah County. The agency is working with Multnomah, and other Oregon and Washington agencies to notify individuals of their potential exposure and help them take steps to prevent exposing others should they become ill.

No additional cases of measles have been identified in Oregon.

Clark County Public Health in Vancouver has reported 30 confirmed cases of measles. To follow its investigation and for a full list of exposures, visit their measles investigation page.

Most Oregonians have been vaccinated against measles and are protected. Anyone who has never been vaccinated is at higher risk of getting measles if they come into contact with someone who is contagious in these new exposure locations:

22262 NE Glisan St, Gresham                 Sunday, Jan. 20, 9–11:30 a.m.

22855 NE Parklane, Wood Village         Sunday, Jan. 20, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.

1700 SW 257th Dr., Troutdale                Wednesday, Jan. 23, 12:30–2 p.m.

25699 SE Stark St, Troutdale                   Wednesday, Jan. 23, 1–2:30 p.m.

 

Find a complete list of all Oregon public exposures here: https://multco.us/health-officer/measles-outbreak-winter-2019-oregon-exposures

WHOM TO CALL

Oregon public health officials urge people to avoid immediately going to a medical office, if:

  1. They are not immune AND
  2. They have been exposed AND
  3. They have symptoms

Instead, call a health care provider or urgent care center by telephone to create an entry plan to avoid exposing others in waiting rooms.

OHA has also established a call center for general questions related to the measles. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should dial 2-1-1. The call center hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, including weekends.

Anyone with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their county health department. For more information on measles for the public, please visit the OHA measles webpage or call the public health departments in the following counties:

  • Multnomah County Public Health: 503-988-3406
  • Clark County Public Health: 360-397-8021
  • Washington County Public Health: 503-846-3594
  • Clackamas County Public Health: 503-655-8411
  • Marion County Public Health Division: 503-588-5621

ABOUT MEASLES

Measles poses the highest risk to unvaccinated pregnant women, infants under 12 months of age, and people with weakened immune systems.

The symptoms of measles start with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that usually begins on the face and spreads to the rest of the body.

Common complications of measles include ear infection, lung infection, and diarrhea. Swelling of the brain is a rare but much more serious complication.

After someone contracts measles, illness develops in about two weeks, but people can be contagious days before they know they’re sick.

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air after a person with measles coughs or sneezes. People are contagious with measles for four days before the rash appears and up to four days after the rash appears. The virus can also linger in the air for up to two hours after someone who is infectious has left.

A person is considered immune to measles if ANY of the following apply:

  1. You were born before 1957.
  2. Your physician has diagnosed you with measles.
  3. A blood test proves that you are immune.
  4. You have been fully vaccinated against measles (one dose for children 12 months through 3 years old, two doses in anyone 4 years and older).

 

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OHA releases application for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts - 01/25/19

January 25, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us

OHA releases application for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts

The Oregon Health Authority has released the request for applications (RFA) that lays out the requirements applicants must meet to serve Oregon Health Plan members for the next five years of coordinated care contracts, also known as "CCO 2.0." Letters of intent to apply will be due to OHA February 1 by 5 p.m.

Oregon first established coordinated care organizations (CCOs) in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They are designed to improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services and are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.

OHA released a draft of the RFA for public comment January 4. The agency received nearly 50 public comments on portions of the draft RFA ranging from the role of traditional health workers to open enrollment for members. Each public comment received is posted on the CCO 2.0 website along with a summary of the changes made to the RFA in response to public comment.

"These contracts will shape the next five years of care that 1 million Oregonians rely on, so it was important for us provide an opportunity for feedback," said Patrick Allen, Director of the Oregon Health Authority. "This input helped us improve the RFA, which will be an important tool for OHA and coordinated care organizations to move the needle on health system transformation and address the most pressing needs of OHP members."

The RFA advances the policy recommendations approved by the Oregon Health Policy Board in October, which addressed Governor Kate Brown’s four priority areas for improvement:

  • Improve the behavioral health systems and address barriers to access to and integration of care.
  • Increase value and pay for performance.
  • Focus on social determinants of health and health equity.
  • Maintain sustainable cost growth and ensure financial transparency.

 

Responses to the RFA are due April 22 by 3 p.m. OHA expects to announce the awards for the CCO contracts in July.

OHA will continue to provide updated information about the CCO 2.0 RFA process on the CCO 2.0 page on the OHA website.

# # #

HERC's Health Technology Assessment Subcommittee meets February 21 in Wilsonville - 01/24/19

Contacts: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us (media inquiries)

Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

HERC’s Health Technology Assessment Subcommittee meets February 21 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Health Technology Assessment Subcommittee

When: February 21, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Rooms 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville, Oregon 97070. The public also may attend via a listen-only conference line (888-204-5984, participant code 801373).

Webinar Registration Link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/2681506943307537155

Agenda: Evidence-based Guideline on Patient Characteristics and Appropriate Procedures for Ambulatory Surgical Centers with Extended Stay Centers. (sources)

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting. 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at C.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us.

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets January 28 in Portland - 01/24/19

January 24, 2019

Media Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets January 28 in Portland

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: Present SB 2198 Cannabis Commission Report to Legislature; patient survey update; GovSpace documents; commission members vote on chair and vice chair; framework of Oregon Medical Marijuana Program; commission meetings around the state; public comment.

When: Jan. 28, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Workgroup meets January 24 in Portland - 01/22/19

January 22, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Workgroup meets January 24 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Workgroup.

When: January 24, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly Lincoln Building) Suite 850, Mary Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St, Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4851900018377321985 and listen-only conference line at 888-398-2342, access code 5731389.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; overview of social complexity data; Dental Quality Alliance (DQA) dental sealants – potential specification changes; 2020 effective contraceptive use specifications: TAG input on use of unspecified codes; substance use disorder measure review; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets January 29 in Portland - 01/22/19

January 22, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets January 29 in Portland

What: The first meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup.

Agenda: Describe the Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative and focus on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder; discuss the role of the workgroup; review opportunities, barriers and resources identified at the November 6 kickoff meeting.

When: January 29, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. It has a focus on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup meets January 28 in Portland - 01/22/19

January 22, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@state.or.us">saerom.y.england@state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup meets January 28 in Portland

What: The first meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup.

Agenda: Describe the Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative and focus on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder; discuss the role of the workgroup; review opportunities, barriers and resources identified at the November 6 kickoff meeting.

When: January 28, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. It has a focus on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Testing for radon is peace of mind for Portland homeowner - 01/22/19

January 22, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Testing for radon is peace of mind for Portland homeowner

January is Radon Action Month to encourage testing during winter months

Many parts of Oregon remain at risk of high radon levels, and for one Portland family it meant listening to their realtor, who not only helped them find their dream home, but was also looking out for their safety.

“Our realtor told us that we should have it tested for radon as part of our inspection. I had not even heard of radon or what it was,” explained Melanie Boekee. “There were borderline levels of radon, so we asked the seller to install a mitigation system.”

Radon is odorless, tasteless and invisible. It is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that comes up from the ground and is drawn into buildings, where it can build up to dangerous levels. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that radon is responsible for more than 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year in the United States. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. after cigarette smoking, and the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers.

Five years after the mitigation system was installed at the Boekees’ home, Melanie is re-testing for radon to ensure the air she is breathing is safe. “The radon test kit was easy to find. They have them all over the place, even on Amazon. It was very easy to use—it only took a couple of minutes to get it set up.”

Many test kits are priced between $15 and $25. Radon problems can be fixed by qualified contractors for a cost similar to that of many common home repairs, such as painting or having a new water heater installed. The best time to test for radon is during the heating season, when the windows and doors are closed up tight. This is when you would expect to find the highest radon levels in your home.

“Every homeowner should test their home for radon every two to five years,” recommends Kari Christensen, Radon Program coordinator at the Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division. “Unfortunately, there are many cities and zip codes in the state for which no testing has been done and the Radon Program has little to no data.”

The Radon Program collects radon test data from test kit manufacturers in an effort to understand which areas of the state have the potential for high radon levels, and to identify areas where educational outreach efforts need to be focused. The program is offering a free radon test kit to residents whose homes are in zip codes with fewer than 20 radon test results. Residents can send an email to adon.program@state.or.us">radon.program@state.or.us to receive instructions on how to get a free test kit, which will be provided while supplies last.

Many regions of the state are at moderate risk of having high radon levels, with several pockets of high-risk areas in the Northwest, around the Willamette Valley, and in eastern and southern Oregon, according to 2018 data published on the Oregon Radon Program website, www.healthoregon.org/radon. A large swath of Portland, particularly in the north, northeastern and southeastern parts of the city, also was found to be at high risk.

“We want that peace of mind, to know that we are safe,” Melanie said of re-testing her home. An update showing Melanie’s radon test results will be posted on OHA’s Facebook page within the next couple of weeks.

There will be an opportunity to attend a free, educational event to learn about radon, areas of concern, health effects and community resources. For details about the event visit: http://northwestradoncoalition.com.

For more information on radon testing and mitigation, radon-resistant new construction, or to order a test kit online, call the Oregon Radon Program at 971-673-0440 or www.healthoregon.org/radon.

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https://youtu.be/R2V05cmTB5A