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VPS employee is ESD 112 region Classified School Employee of the Year (Photo) - 04/16/15
A Vancouver Public Schools employee has been named 2015 Classified School Employee of the Year for the ESD 112 region. The award is given by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and recognizes an outstanding classified school employee in each ESD region of the state.

Eddie Sawyer, an Instructional Technology Facilitator for VPS received the award based on points acquired through his: professional biography, outstanding work performance, professional leadership and collaboration, resume, and letters of recommendation.

Sawyer has been an Instructional Technology Facilitator for Vancouver Public Schools since 1999. A 1994 graduate of Fort Vancouver High School, Sawyer began his career with Vancouver Public Schools as a high school summer intern. Sawyer earned his Associate's Degree from Clark College in 1998 and his Bachelor's Degree from Washington State University in 2006.

In his work with VPS, Sawyer has directly impacted the lives of students by putting devices into their hands as part of the district's 1:1 initiative. He led a project to introduce students with autism to devices, helping them to communicate and connect with others in a way they had not been able to do before. He works with staff to train them on the use of devices and helps troubleshoot issues that arise throughout the process.

Sawyer has dabbled in everything from network administration to helping craft district policy around student 1:1 devices. "I like the challenge of being a modern day 'jack-of-all-trades' and I've learned how my work affects students, teachers and our district leaders," said Sawyer.

In a nomination letter, 2012 Washington State Teacher of the Year Mark Ray writes "What makes Eddie unique is his ability to effectively work with others and to think like a student, a teacher, a technician, a principal and a district leader, sometimes all at once."

"While I am not a teacher, I work with exceptional teachers every day in the Instructional Technology Department and in buildings," he said. "And I have come to understand what it takes to make sure students can be successful."

"Over the last 22 years, Eddie has been part of the technology leadership that has come to define Vancouver Public Schools," said Superintendent Steven Webb. "While he began as a student tech stringing data cables and answering help desk calls, he is now a central figure in our digital transformation. In the current school year, Eddie is leading the technical deployment of 5,000 iPads to virtually all of our middle school students, enabling innovative assessment in kindergarten classrooms, and supporting a host of next generation digital content pilots."

Sawyer will be recognized along with honorees from other regions of the state by Superintendent Randy Dorn May in Olympia and at a Governor's reception in June. Sawyer's application will be forwarded to the state level for consideration for the Washington State Classified Employee of the Year award.


ABOUT ESD 112:
Educational Service District 112 enables school districts to concentrate more time, money and energy on student learning. Headquartered in Vancouver, ESD 112 provides local and regional cooperative programs and services to school districts and communities in the six counties of Southwest Washington. ESD 112 was established by the Legislature in 1969 as one of nine regional educational service centers to work in partnership with local communities and school districts to provide support services for student instruction, professional development for staff, and technical assistance in the administration of schools. The agency offers more than 250 cooperatives and services ranging from interactive telecommunications to a child care consortium. There are 30 public schools, 23 private schools, two state schools and 26 child care centers serving 100,000 students and 15,000 school employees who benefit from ESD services.

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ESD 112 region schools receive state's highest honor - 04/15/15
Thirty-one schools in the ESD 112 region are 2014 Washington Achievement Award winners.

The Washington Achievement Award is sponsored by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and the State Board of Education. Award winners are selected using the state's Accountability Index and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Flexibility Waiver.

Schools are recognized as top performers in one of six categories:

* Overall Excellence
* High Progress
* Reading Growth
* Math Growth
* Extended Graduation Rate (awarded to high schools and comprehensive schools only)
* English Language Acquisition

"Honoring successful schools is one of the most important things we do," Dorn said. "We know schools are doing great work and are getting better at serving all students every day. We may not be where we want to be, but we are making progress. These awards celebrate both achievement and growth."

ESD 112 region schools receiving the award are:

Battle Ground School District--CAM Academy (Overall Excellence), Pleasant Valley Middle School (Math Growth), Pleasant Valley Primary School (English Language Acquisition).

Camas School District--Camas High School (Overall Excellence), Grass Valley Elementary School (Reading Growth), Helen Baller Elementary School (Reading Growth), Liberty Middle School (Overall Excellence, Reading Growth), Skyridge Middle School (Overall Excellence, Reading Growth, Math Growth).

Evergreen School District--Heritage High School (English Language Acquisition), Mill Plain Elementary School (Math Growth), Sunset Elementary School (High Progress).

Kalama School District--Kalama Junior/Senior High School (Extended Graduation Rate).

Kelso School District--Barnes Elementary School (High Progress), Kelso High School (High Progress).

Longview School District--Mark Morris High School (Math Growth), R.A. Long High School (High Progress).

Naselle-Grays River Valley School District--Naselle Elementary School (High Progress).

Ridgefield School District--Ridgefield High School (Overall Excellence, Reading Growth, Math Growth), South Ridge Elementary School (Overall Excellence, High Progress, Reading Growth), View Ridge Middle School (High Progress).

Trout Lake School District--Trout Lake School (High Progress).

Vancouver School District--Dwight D. Eisenhower Elementary (English Language Acquisition, Reading Growth), Harney Elementary School (High Progress), Hough Elementary School (High Progress), Vancouver School of Arts and Academics (Overall Excellence).

Washougal School District--Cape Horn-Skye Elementary School (High Progress).

White Salmon Valley School District--Columbia High School (Reading Growth).

Woodland School District--Woodland Intermediate School (High Progress).


The award-winning schools will be honored at a ceremony on April 28 at Spanaway Lake High School in Spanaway, Washington.

More information
ยท WAA criteria and list of winners: http://www.k12.wa.us/EducationAwards/WashingtonAchievement


ABOUT ESD 112:
Educational Service District 112 enables school districts to concentrate more time, money and energy on student learning. Headquartered in Vancouver, ESD 112 provides local and regional cooperative programs and services to school districts and communities in the six counties of Southwest Washington. ESD 112 was established by the Legislature in 1969 as one of nine regional educational service centers to work in partnership with local communities and school districts to provide support services for student instruction, professional development for staff, and technical assistance in the administration of schools. The agency offers more than 250 cooperatives and services ranging from interactive telecommunications to a child care consortium. There are 30 public schools, 23 private schools, two state schools and 26 child care centers serving 100,000 students and 15,000 school employees who benefit from ESD services.

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Impacts of Early Start Act are far reaching - 04/07/15
Research shows that high-quality early learning reaps tremendous rewards in increasing the quality of life for children, families and communities. Children who have access to high-quality early learning programs are 29% more likely to graduate from high school, 50% less likely to require special education, 50% less likely to become teen parents and 70% less likely to be arrested for a violent crime before the age of 18.1 In addition, children who benefit from high-quality care earn, on average, 33% more than children who don't.2

Despite a strong body of research and general support among policymakers, early learning receives less than 1% of Washington's state operating budget. When it comes to providing preschool opportunities for low income children, Clark County is among the most underserved in the state, with just 34% of eligible three- and four-year-olds receiving access to subsidized programs.

As the legislature grapples with the state budget process, its commitment to fully fund the Early Start Act will impact the availability of high-quality early learning programs that create long-term, positive outcomes for children.

In Southwest Washington, the level at which the Early Start Act is funded will make a tremendous difference for several key early learning programs and partnerships. In our region, full funding would:
* Provide additional Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) "slots" for qualifying children in Southwest Washington.
* Provide funding to support and strengthen Early Achievers, the state's quality rating and improvement system that currently serves 44% of licensed child care providers and reaches 5,386 children in Southwest Washington and 57,000 in our state. In Clark County, 112 providers are signed up for Early Achievers and Early Start funding would allow additional programs to enroll and participate.
* Support the Working Connections Child Care subsidy program to support 12-month continuous child care eligibility for qualifying families. Children thrive when they have access to stable, consistent high quality care. Without 12-month authorization, children are vulnerable to a status change that may result in disrupted access to child care.



"I am very pleased that both the House and the Senate budgets include funding for the Early Start Act," said Senator Annette Cleveland, D-Vancouver. "Our kids start learning at birth and we need to do all we can to make sure that all kids in our communities have access to high quality early learning opportunities. As the budget advances this session, I will continue to strongly support the need for this vital funding."

"Research underscores the importance of early learning," said ESD 112 Superintendent Tim Merlino. "Allocating adequate funding to support our state's youngest learners is a wise investment in Washington's future. High-quality early learning programs save the state millions in costly intervention programs later in life. It's a very good return on the state's investment."






ABOUT ESD 112:
Educational Service District 112 enables school districts to concentrate more time, money and energy on student learning. Headquartered in Vancouver, ESD 112 provides local and regional cooperative programs and services to school districts and communities in the six counties of Southwest Washington. ESD 112 was established by the Legislature in 1969 as one of nine regional educational service centers to work in partnership with local communities and school districts to provide support services for student instruction, professional development for staff, and technical assistance in the administration of schools. The agency offers more than 250 cooperatives and services ranging from interactive telecommunications to a child care consortium. There are 30 public schools, 23 private schools, two state schools and 26 child care centers serving 100,000 students and 15,000 school employees who benefit from ESD services.

For more information about ESD 112 Early Learning programs:
http://web3.esd112.org/ccfs


ABOUT OUR PARTNERS:
CHILD CARE AWARE : www.wa.childcareaware.org
Child Care Aware of Washington was created to increase the consistency and effectiveness of statewide information, resources and referral services and to consistently educate and engage parents to consider and understand the importance of high-quality care and its link to school readiness for their children.
ECEAP: www.wshheadstarteceap.com
The Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) is Washington's pre-kindergarten program serving at-risk three- and four-year-olds and their families. ECEAP provides children in 36 counties with preschool education and access to family support services.

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Sources:

1) First Five Years Fund: Invest in US, http://ffyf.org/resources/changing-the-metrics-of-turnaround-to-encourage-early-ed/


(2) National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: Study of Early Childhood Care and Youth Development, http://www.nichd.nih.gov/research/supported/Pages/seccyd.aspx