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Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month (Photo) - 02/25/21

(PLEASE NOTE: RESENDING WITH UPDATED/CORRECT INFO. PLEASE DISREGARD EARLIER VERSION)

 

For the 19th year, the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling dedicates March to help increase public awareness of problem gambling and the availability of prevention, treatment, and recovery services.  This coincides with the National Problem Gambling Awareness Month whose campaign theme is “Awareness + Action.”

“Problem Gambling Awareness Month is always important to us, as we highlight a ‘hidden’ addiction that millions of Americans face, including one in every 38 Oregon adults,” said Executive Director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Julie Hynes.

“This year, we bring special attention to problem gambling, given the stress, isolation and financial uncertainty of so many Oregonians throughout the pandemic,” said Hynes. “Some can be tempted to seek hope through jackpots and escape from everyday problems via other gambling options. More widespread legalized online betting, day trading, and even video gaming apps have caused harm for more people this year. We want people to know that they’re not alone, and that there is effective, free and confidential help available for them as well as their loved ones.”

National Problem Gambling Awareness Month is a grassroots effort that brings together a wide range of stakeholders - public health organizations, advocacy groups and gambling operators – who work collaboratively to let people know that hope and help exist.

Outreach continues to be challenging because of the pandemic.  People are isolated at home and the need for online gambling resources and options for treatment are critical. Visits to the Oregon Problem Gambling Resource website (www.opgr.org) tend to increase during March as result of the focused marketing and social media outreach efforts.

“Creating awareness of problem gambling and available resources is a statewide commitment that is reflected in the official proclamation that Oregon Lottery and the Oregon Health Authority worked with the Governor’s office to develop,” added Lottery Senior Manager Product Market Stacy Shaw, who is also an officer on the National Council on Problem Gambling board of directors.

“It’s great that people are seeking information,” Shaw added, “and we hope that the conversation and action continues to grow this year. We’re proud to be in a state that has robust system of prevention through treatment services that are free to anyone concerned about gambling problems, and we want people to know that they don’t have to worry about seeking help.

“This year we are focusing on letting people know that in Oregon treatment is really free, a message that’s important to people struggling with gambling issues.”

Problem Gambling Services Manager Greta Coe, with Oregon Health Authority’s Health Systems Division, notes the COVID pandemic has made this “a very trying and isolating time for many people.” Because of this, she says, it was important for Oregon Problem Gambling Resource (OPGR) and other local community sources to ramp up their outreach activities and media presence to address the increase in gambling activity and addiction.

“We’ve expanded our efforts to build awareness that gambling is an activity that comes with risks,” said Coe, “and it’s crucial we provide both free education and judgment-free treatment for those who develop gambling problems, as well as resources for those impacted by a loved one’s gambling.

The Oregon Lottery’s commitment to problem gambling support is year-round. Since 1992, one percent of Oregon Lottery profits has funded problem gambling treatment and prevention efforts throughout Oregon. Since that time, over $111 million in Lottery funds has supported those services.

To get help for a gambling issue, anyone can call 1-877-MYLIMIT. Treatment is free, confidential and it works. For more information about problem gambling treatment resources or to chat with a specialist, go to Oregon Problem Gambling Resource at opgr.org. 

About the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is the state affiliate to the National Council on Problem Gambling. Its purpose is to promote the health of Oregonians by supporting efforts to minimize gambling related harm. Board members include stakeholders from the gaming industry, the treatment and prevention field, the recovery community and state and county administrators.

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Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month - 02/25/21

For the 19th year, the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling dedicates March to help increase public awareness of problem gambling and the availability of prevention, treatment, and recovery services.  This coincides with the National Problem Gambling Awareness Month whose campaign theme is “Awareness + Action.”

“Problem Gambling Awareness Month is always important to us, as we highlight a ‘hidden’ addiction that millions of Americans face, including one in every 38 Oregon adults,” said Executive Director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Julie Hynes.

“This year, we bring special attention to problem gambling, given the stress, isolation and financial uncertainty of so many Oregonians throughout the pandemic,” said Hynes. “Some can be tempted to seek hope through jackpots and escape from everyday problems via other gambling options. More widespread legalized online betting, day trading, and even video gaming apps have caused harm for more people this year. We want people to know that they’re not alone, and that there is effective, free and confidential help available for them as well as their loved ones.”

National Problem Gambling Awareness Month is a grassroots effort that brings together a wide range of stakeholders – public health organizations, advocacy groups and gambling operators – who work collaboratively to let people know that hope and help exist.

Outreach continues to be challenging because of the pandemic.  People are isolated at home and the need for online gambling resources and options for treatment are critical. Visits to the Oregon Problem Gambling Resource website (www.opgr.org) tend to increase during March as result of the focused marketing and social media outreach efforts.

“Creating awareness of problem gambling and available resources is a statewide commitment that is reflected in the official proclamation that Oregon Lottery and the Oregon Health Authority worked with the Governor’s office to develop,” added Lottery Senior Manager Product Market Stacy Shaw, who is also an officer on the National Council on Problem Gambling board of directors.

“It’s great that people are seeking information,” Shaw added, “and we hope that the conversation and action continues to grow this year. We’re proud to be in a state that has robust system of prevention through treatment services that are free to anyone concerned about gambling problems, and we want people to know that they don’t have to worry about seeking help.

“This year we are focusing on letting people know that in Oregon treatment is really free, a message that’s important to people struggling with gambling issues.”

Problem Gambling Services Manager Greta Coe, with Oregon Health Authority’s Health Systems Division, notes the COVID pandemic has made this “a very trying and isolating time for many people.” Because of this, she says, it was important for Oregon Problem Gambling Resource (OPGR) and other local community sources to ramp up their outreach activities and media presence to address the increase in gambling activity and addiction.

“We’ve expanded our efforts to build awareness that gambling is an activity that comes with risks,” said Coe, “and it’s crucial we provide both free education and judgment-free treatment for those who develop gambling problems, as well as resources for those impacted by a loved one’s gambling.”

The Oregon Lottery’s commitment to problem gambling support is year-round. Since 1992, one percent of Oregon Lottery profits has funded problem gambling treatment and prevention efforts. Since that time, over $100 million in Lottery funds has supported those services.

To get help for a gambling issue, anyone can call 1-877-MYLIMIT. Treatment is free, confidential and it works. For more information about problem gambling treatment resources or to chat with a specialist, go to Oregon Problem Gambling Resource at opgr.org. 

About the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is the state affiliate to the National Council on Problem Gambling. Its purpose is to promote the health of Oregonians by supporting efforts to minimize gambling related harm. Board members include stakeholders from the gaming industry, the treatment and prevention field, the recovery community and state and county administrators.

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New Lottery prize drop box in Salem
New Lottery prize drop box in Salem
Lottery Offers New Drop Box in Salem for Winners to Claim Prizes - 02/11/21

Feb. 11, 2021 - Salem, Ore. – Beginning Friday, Feb. 12, a new drop box at the Lottery offices in Salem will open for players to submit their winning tickets and claim forms. The drop box is for prizes over $600 and up to $50,000. Prizes of $600 or less can be redeemed at any Oregon Lottery retail location. The Lottery’s Wilsonville office remains closed and does not have a drop box.

For the health and safety of Lottery players and employees during the pandemic, the Lottery’s payment centers in Salem and Wilsonville have remained closed to the public since March 2020.

“With Lottery offices closed to the public, winners of Lottery prizes over $600 had limited options to claim their prize,” said Lottery Director Barry Pack. “Players could either patiently wait for the Lottery payment centers to reopen or mail their winning tickets to the Lottery office in Salem. Providing the drop box is just part of an on-going effort to give our players a way to get their prizes without having to put their winning ticket in the mail.”

The drop box offers 24/7 access to submit a prize claim at the Lottery office in Salem. Lottery staff will process claims daily, and players should allow up to 14 days to receive their prize in the mail. Winner claim forms and envelopes will be available at the drop box for players to submit their prize claims.

In addition to the new drop box, the Lottery has been exploring other ways to provide players who have won prizes over $600 with a way to claim their prize. In the coming months, a new walk-up window and a new player-appointment system will also be available.

Players with winning tickets of $50,000 or more, still need to make an appointment to come to the Oregon Lottery office in Salem. Call 503-540-1000 for assistance. As always, players should be certain to sign the back of their tickets.

For downloadable claim forms and updates, players can go to oregonlottery.org/claim-a-prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org 

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Strong Sales Power Scoreboard on Super Bowl Sunday - 02/08/21

February 8, 2021 - Salem, Ore. – The 55th Super Bowl is now in the books and Oregon Lottery Scoreboard players came out in record numbers.

The NFL’s final game of the season between Tampa Bay and Kansas City brought in more than 150,000 wagers through the Lottery’s Scoreboard sports betting app. Those wagers accounted for nearly $3.5 million, with the average wager coming in at approximately $23.

“For the big game, there were more than 23,000 unique Scoreboard players,” said Lottery Sportsbook Product Manager Tony Gallenbeck. “Players took home the largest share of dollars wagered, translating to nearly $700,000 in revenue generated by Scoreboard. The game also prompted nearly 1,500 new registrations on Sunday alone.”

Scoreboard players had more options than picking which team they felt was going to win the game. Scoreboard offered many “proposition bets,” or novelty bets, where players could wager everything from the number of yards specific players would get, to if there would be special teams or defensive touchdowns. In fact, there were more than 3,500-coin toss “prop bets,” and more than 4,000 wagers on what color the Gatorade would be that was poured on the winning coach. 

“With the pandemic, it’s been a challenging year for all of us,” Oregon Lottery Director Barry Pack. “Events like the Super Bowl provide not only a fun distraction, but also keeps sports betting dollars in Oregon for important state programs.”

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

Scoreboard game logo
Scoreboard game logo
Scoreboard Prop Bets for the Big Game - 02/02/21

Feb. 2, 2021 - Salem, Ore. – The next NFL champion will be crowned when Tampa Bay and Kansas City square off Sunday, Feb. 7 and the Oregon Lottery’s sports betting game, Scoreboard, offers players a chance to have some fun during the Big Game.

For Sunday’s game, Scoreboard players have hundreds of bets options to choose from to help them get into the game! Whether it’s who wins the coin toss or if an offensive lineman will score a touchdown, Scoreboard’s “prop bets” add a little fun to the game. Here are just some of the Scoreboard prop bets for the Big Game:

- What color will the liquid be that is dumped on the winning coach?

- Was the result of the coin toss heads or tails?

- Which quarterback throws for more most passing yards?

- Who will be the game’s MVP?

- Will defenses hold up for a scoreless quarter?

- Will the winning team end the game by taking a knee (Victory formation)?

Oregon Lottery Scoreboard debuted in Oct. 2019 and since that time, nearly $300 million has been wagered. According to the Lottery’s Sports Betting Products Manager Kerry Hemphill, since Scoreboard launched, over 10 million bets have been placed with 78,000 registered players.

“We are thrilled that Oregon sports fans have embraced the game,” said Hemphill. “January 2021 was Scoreboard's best month ever with over 1 million bets totaling nearly $35 million in wagers. With a year under our belt, Scoreboard is better than ever, and more capable of handling the high volume of wagers during major events."

To play Oregon Lottery Scoreboard or for more about the game, go to https://sports.oregonlottery.org/sports/  

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Attached Media Files: Scoreboard game logo
$7.4 million Megabucks jackpot winners Erik Maki and Brian Krahmer
$7.4 million Megabucks jackpot winners Erik Maki and Brian Krahmer
Friends for over 40 Years Win $7.4 Million Jackpot (Photo) - 01/29/21

CORRECTION: THE WINNING TIKCET WAS PURCHASED AT "CEDAR MILLS LIQUOR STORE"

 

Jan. 29, 2021 - Salem, Ore. – A good friendship is priceless, as Erik Maki and Brian Krahmer will tell you. The duo has been friends since middle school and after more than 40 years of sharing a friendship, they can also say they share a $7.4 million Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot.

Over the past 28 weeks, Maki and Krahmer, both of Hillsboro, who have also worked together for 25 years, have been taking turns buying Megabucks tickets.

“We always check our tickets on Monday,” said Maki, who has also worked with Krahmer for 25 years. “The best we’d done had been winning a free ticket! Our offices are next door to each other and Brian brought the ticket and said we’d won $7,400. We were pretty excited about that. Then Brian decided to check what number we’d missed and he compared the ticket to the Lottery app. That’s when he saw that we’d matched all six numbers and we’d really won $7.4 million!”

The first thing they did was contact their wives to tell them the news. “They didn’t believe us at first,” said Krahmer. “That was understandable because we both like to joke around.” Once their wives were convinced that had won, Maki and Krahmer wisely contacted their financial planner and CPA before heading to the Lottery to claim their prize January 26.

The two friends split the $7.4 million prize from the January 23 drawing, and after taxes, each received a check for nearly $1.3 million. Krahmer bought their winning ticket at the Cedar Mills Liquor Store on Cornell Road in Portland.

To protect the health and safety of its employees and the public, the Oregon Lottery has temporarily closed the Salem and Wilsonville Lottery offices. Officials with the Lottery continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely. If players have a winning ticket, they can fill out a claim form on the Oregon Lottery website, https://oregonlottery.org/about/claim-prizes , and then mail in the signed ticket and claim form.

Players who have winning tickets of $50,000 or more, will need to make an appointment to come to the Oregon Lottery office in Salem. Call 503-540-1000 for assistance. As always, players should be certain to sign the back of their tickets.

Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org 

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