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BLM Seeks Nominations to Resource Advisory Councils - 04/20/18

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced that it is seeking public nominations for positions on 30 citizen-based sounding boards for BLM initiatives, proposals, and policy changes.

Resource Advisory Councils (RACs) provide advice and recommendations for the BLM to consider on a range of resource and land management issues. The BLM maintains 37 such chartered advisory committees located in the West. Of those committees, 30 are RACs. Each Council consists of 10 to 15 members from diverse interests in local communities, and they assist in the development of committee recommendations that address public land management issues. Established by charter, RACs are critical in assisting the BLM in continuing to be a good neighbor in the communities that the agency serves.

"The BLM Resource Advisory Councils are an important forum for the community conversation that is a key component of public land management," said BLM State Director Jamie E. Connell. "By ensuring that RAC representation reflects a variety of perspectives, RAC members provide a valuable service to the Bureau by delving into issues and proposing solutions on a wide variety of land and resource uses issues."

Individuals may nominate themselves or others to serve on a Council. Nominees, who must be residents of the state or states where the RAC has jurisdiction, will be reviewed on the basis of their training, education, and knowledge of the Council’s geographic area. Nominees should also demonstrate a commitment to consensus building and collaborative decision-making. Letters of reference must accompany all nominations from any represented interests or organizations, a completed RAC application, and any other information that speaks to the nominee’s qualifications.

Each of the 30 RACs has different positions open in the following categories:

Category One – Public land ranchers and representatives of organizations associated with energy and mineral development, the commercial timber industry, transportation or rights-of-way, off-highway vehicle use, and commercial recreation.

Category Two – Representatives of nationally or regionally recognized environmental organizations, archaeological and historical organizations, dispersed recreation activities, and wild horse and burro organizations.

Category Three – Representatives of State, county, or local elected office; representatives and employees of a state agency responsible for the management of natural resources; representatives of Indian tribes within or adjacent to the area for which the RAC is organized, Alaska Natives as appropriate to the state of Alaska; representatives and employees of academic institutions who are involved in natural sciences; and the public-at-large.

The BLM administers 8 advisory councils and committees in Oregon and Washington. More information, including an Oregon/Washington RAC boundary map, can be found online at https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington.

As published in a notice in today’s Federal Register, the BLM will consider nominations for 45 days (until June 4, 2018).  Requests for more information, nominations and completed applications for RACs should be sent to the appropriate BLM personnel listed below:

Coastal Oregon RAC

Megan Harper, BLM Coos Bay District Office, 1300 Airport Lane, North Bend, OR 97459, 541-751-4353.

 

Eastern Washington RAC

Jeff Clark, BLM Spokane District Office, 1103 North Fancher Road, Spokane, WA 99212, 509-536-1297.

 

John Day-Snake RAC

Lisa Clark, BLM Prineville District Office, 3050 NE 3rd Street, Prineville, OR 97754, 541-416-6864.

 

Northwest Oregon RAC

Jennifer Velez, BLM Northwest Oregon District Office, 1717 Fabry Road SE, Salem, OR 97306, 541-222-9241.

 

San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee

Marcia de Chadenedes, BLM San Juan Islands National Monument Office,

P.O. Box 3, 37 Washburn Avenue, Lopez Island, Washington  98261, 360-468-3051.

 

Southeast Oregon RAC

Larisa Bogardus, BLM Lakeview District Office, 1301 S. G Street, Lakeview, OR 97630, 541-947-6237.

 

Southwest Oregon RAC

Christina Breslin, BLM Medford District Office, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, OR 97504, 541-618-2371.

 

Steens Mountain Advisory Council

Tara Thissell, BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, OR  97738, 541-573-4519.

 

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.

BLM announces call for nominations to Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board - 04/10/18

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Land Management is issuing a call for public nominations to fill three positions on its national Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board.  Nominations are for a term of three years and are needed to represent the following categories of interest: public interest, wild horse and burro advocacy, and veterinary medicine.

The Advisory Board advises the BLM, an agency of the Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, an agency of the Department of Agriculture, on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies.  The Board will meet one to four times a year and the BLM’s Designated Federal Official may call additional meetings when necessary.  Members serve without salary, but are reimbursed for travel and per diem expenses according to government travel regulations. 

The Advisory Board is comprised of nine members who represent a balance of interests.  Each member has knowledge or special expertise that qualifies him or her to provide advice in one of the following categories: wild horse and burro advocacy, wild horse and burro research, veterinary medicine, natural resources management, humane advocacy, wildlife management, livestock management, public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior), and public interest (with special knowledge of protection of wild horses and burros, management of wildlife, animal husbandry, or natural resource management). 

Individuals shall qualify to serve on the Board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent.  They should demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.  

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the Advisory Board; individuals may also nominate themselves.  In accordance with Section 7 of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, Federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the Board. 

Interested parties shall submit a resume and nomination letter. The following information must be provided: the position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered; the nominee’s first, middle, and last name; business and home addresses and phone numbers; e-mail address; present occupation/title and employer; education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study); career highlights; qualifications:  relevant education, training, and experience; experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management; experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management); and experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions.  Applicants must also indicate any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by the nominee or his/her employer; whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist; and explain why the nominee wants to serve on the Board.  Also, at least one letter of reference from special interests or organizations the nominee may represent must be provided.

Nominations may be submitted by e-mail to Dorothea Boothe, at oothe@blm.gov" target="_blank">dboothe@blm.gov.  To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street, N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Boothe, WO-260, Washington, DC 20240.  To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Boothe, Washington, DC 20003. 

All nominations must be received no later than 45 days after notice has been published in the Federal Register, or postmarked by the same date.  The BLM will publish its request for nominations in the Federal Register on Wednesday, April 11, 2018.
 

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.

BLM announces outcome-based grazing projects for 2018 - 03/23/18

Initiative provides grazing permit holders flexibility in the management of livestock

WASHINGTON -- The Bureau of Land Management today announced 11 demonstration projects in six states for its outcome-based grazing authorizations initiative, which is designed to provide BLM managers and grazing permit holders greater flexibility in the management of permitted livestock. This initiative emphasizes the Trump Administration's goal of promoting shared conservation stewardship of public lands while supporting uses such as livestock grazing.

The flexibility allowed under the outcome-based grazing authorizations, which were first announced in September 2017, will demonstrate management practices that BLM managers and livestock operators can use to respond to changing, on-the-ground conditions such as wildfires, high moisture years, or drought. This will better ensure healthy rangelands, high-quality wildlife habitat, and economically sustainable ranching operations.

"The demonstration projects will play an important part in establishing outcome-based grazing authorizations as a standard practice," said Brian Steed, Deputy Director of Programs and Policy. "We will consider the success of the demonstration projects as we develop guidance for future authorizations."

Outcome-based grazing emphasizes conservation performance, ecological, economic and social outcomes and cooperative management of public lands. This initiative will help demonstrate that permitted livestock grazing on public lands can operate under a less rigid framework than is commonly used in order to better reach agreed upon habitat and vegetation goals.

The demonstration projects will provide BLM, working in partnership with ranchers and other partners, with an opportunity to enhance its guidance and best management practices to use when issuing grazing permits. The projects will also be used as models for developing cooperative monitoring plans and land health evaluations that will be implemented in future authorizations under this program.

The permit holders chosen to serve as demonstration projects are:
- Little Snake Land Company in Craig, Colorado (Little Snake Field Office)
- Deep Creek Ranch LLC in Burley, Idaho (Burley Field Office)
- Joe King and Sons, Inc. and Gran Prairie Limited Partnership in Lewistown, Montana (Lewistown Field Office)
- Winecup-Gamble Ranch in Elko, Nevada (Wells Field Office)
- Elko Land and Livestock Company in Elko, Nevada (Tuscarora Field Office)
- Willow Ranch in Battle Mountain, Nevada (Mt. Lewis Field Office)
- Smith Creek Ranch, Carson City, Nevada (Stillwater Field Office)
- John Uhalde and Company in Ely, Nevada (Bristlecone Field Office)
- Roaring Springs Ranch in Burns, Oregon (Andrews/Steens Field Office)
- Fitzgerald Ranches in Lakeview, Oregon (Lakeview Field Office)
- PH Livestock in Rawlins, Wyoming (Rawlins Field Office)

The BLM looks forward to working with ranchers and other partners on the selected projects to develop innovative, flexible, and forward looking best management practices that can be applied more widely on the public lands.

For more information on outcome-based grazing authorizations, please visit http://www.blm.gov/programs/natural-resources/rangelands-and-grazing/livestock-grazing.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016--more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.