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News Releases
The Bureau of Land Management releases final plan to conserve and restore sagebrush communities in the Great Basin - 11/27/20

BOISE, Idaho – Today, the Bureau of Land Management released the final programmatic environmental impact statement for fuels reduction and rangeland restoration in the Great Basin. This programmatic environmental impact statement is intended to further efforts to conserve and restore sagebrush communities within a 223 million-acre area that includes portions of Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Utah.

“The Department has led the way in advancing critical treatments, including creating fuel breaks, which stop or slow fires,” said Casey Hammond, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Lands and Minerals. “This effort focused on reducing fuels and restoring natural vegetation will reduce the intensity of wildfires, which in turn will reduce the threats from large and severe wildfires to sagebrush-steppe ecosystem and rangeland resources. As we get projects done, these two approaches will work together.”

The Trump Administration has prioritized active management of the nation’s public lands as provided in Executive Order 13855 and Secretary's Order 3372, which establish a meaningful and coordinated framework for ensuring the protection of people, communities, and natural resources. Implementation of both orders is a priority for reducing the risks of deadly and destructive wildfires.

Sagebrush communities in the Great Basin are a vital part of Western working landscapes and are home to over 350 species of plants and wildlife. Intact sagebrush communities are disappearing within the Great Basin due to increased large and severe wildfires, the spread of invasive annual grasses, and the encroachment of pinyon-juniper. The Great Basin region is losing sagebrush communities faster than they can reestablish naturally. Approximately 45 percent of the historical range of sagebrush has been lost. Fuels reduction and rangeland restoration treatments can reduce fire severity, increase sagebrush communities’ resistance to invasive annual grasses and improve their ability to recover after wildfires.

This effort complements a decision to construct up to 11,000 miles of fuel breaks in the Great Basin that was issued last spring. That decision is already being used to expedite construction of approximately 190 miles of fuel breaks in Idaho, Oregon, California, and Nevada.

“Restoring sagebrush communities improves the sustainability of working rangelands and can reduce the expansion of invasive annual grasses,” said Deputy Director for Policy and Programs William Perry Pendley. “People in the Great Basin depend on these landscapes for their livelihoods and recreation and wildlife rely on them for habitat.”  

Under the leadership of President Trump and Secretary Bernhardt, the BLM significantly reduced hazardous fuel loads in fire-prone areas by treating more than 782,000 acres in fiscal year 2020 using a variety of active management vegetation treatments including mechanical, biological, and chemical tools as well as prescribed fire.

The preferred alternative outlined in the final fuels reduction and rangeland restoration programmatic environmental impact statement analyzes a full suite of manual, chemical and mechanical treatments, including prescribed fire, seeding, and targeted grazing to reduce fuels and conserve and restore sagebrush communities. When completed, the programmatic environmental impact statement will not authorize any specific fuels reduction or rangeland restoration projects. Instead, it will analyze common elements of fuels reduction and rangeland restoration projects. Local offices can use this information to comply with National Environmental Policy Act requirements when planning and analyzing specific projects, potentially allowing for more rapid implementation.

An electronic copy of the Final PEIS and associated documents is available for public review for 30 days on the BLM Land Use Planning and NEPA register: https://go.usa.gov/x79bp . The BLM will issue a record of decision after the end of the public review period.

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals. 

Christmas tree permits now available! - 11/13/20

Roseburg, Ore. -- Christmas tree permits will be available from the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Roseburg District Office from November 16 through December 22, 2020. 

The cost for a permit for single tree up to 12 feet high is $5.00. There is a limit of three trees per household. No commercial permits will be issued. The permit tag authorizes purchasers to cut their own tree(s) on a self-serve basis in either the Swiftwater or South River Resource Areas on BLM managed lands. 

Permits and maps are available for purchase by phone at 541-440-4930 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The permit will be mailed to the purchaser. Please allow several business days for delivery. Due to current restrictions, permits cannot be purchased in person at this time.

For more information contact Roseburg BLM at (541) 440-4930, or check out the short video about purchasing a Christmas tree at the following link:  https://youtu.be/zIcSuTf-7Es

 

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

Bureau of Land Management winter recreation media availability - 11/10/20

Media Advisory
Oregon/Washington State Office
1220 SW. 3rd Avenue
Portland, OR 97204

 

Winter Recreation on Bureau of Land Management Public Lands

What: Tips and tricks to safely enjoy your public lands this winter

Where: Virtual, link provided upon RSVP

Date: November 17, 2020

Time: 10:00 a.m.

Who: David Ballenger, State Recreation Lead, Bureau of Land Management OR/WA

RSVP REQUIRED: Please RSVP by 12pm Monday, Nov 16 with your name and affiliated media organization to Morgan Rubanow, BLM Public Affairs Specialist: ubanow@blm.gov">mrubanow@blm.gov. Those who RSVP will be sent a link to the virtual meeting.

 

Portland, Ore. – Wintertime brings new ways to explore your public lands, with or without snow! Outdoor adventures on public lands provide memories that can last a lifetime, but visitors must help preserve these landscapes for future generations.

Media are invited to participate in a Virtual Press Event with Bureau of Land Management Oregon-Washington Recreation Lead, David Ballenger.

With more than a decade of experience in outdoor recreation, David will share tips and tricks for recreating responsibly and safely during the winter months. David will share information on where to go, what to bring, basic winter recreation safety tips, and other useful advice to get the best out of the Pacific Northwest winter. There will be time for related recreation questions at the end of the event.

 

-BLM-  

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.