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Western Oregon RAC Map
Western Oregon RAC Map
Bureau of Land Management Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council to meet virtually June 24 to 25 - 06/10/21

Medford, Ore.  – The Bureau of Land Management’s Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet virtually June 24 to 25, 2021.

The Western Oregon RAC will be reviewing a business plan to modify fees at day-use sites, campgrounds, and group facilities across the BLM’s Northwest Oregon District. The proposal would modify fees at two existing day-use sites, and 13 campgrounds and group facilities. It would establish new fees at 16 day-use sites, campgrounds, and group facilities that currently do not charge fees. A fee approval is also requested for two campground facilities that are proposed for future development. The Northwest Oregon District is also proposing an annual pass that could be used to cover fees at day-use sites.

The Western Oregon RAC has the authority under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act to make formal recommendations on specific recreation fee proposals, an important step ahead of a fee or fee change being implemented. The RAC approval will not result in an immediate increase in fees, but is one important step in the public input process.

In addition, the Western Oregon RAC will be reviewing Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act Title II funding proposals and recommending projects for funding. The projects provide community-based solutions to pressing public lands challenges like wildland fire prevention, trash clean-up, watershed restoration, road maintenance, control of noxious weeds and more. Over the years, Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act projects have provided trail maintenance, culvert replacement or removal, soil improvement, vegetation/density management, wildfire hazard reduction, stream channel enhancement, control of noxious and exotic weeds, and opportunities for youth training and employment. 

“The Western Oregon RAC is made up of valuable partners who represent the diverse perspectives of Western Oregon communities,” said BLM Medford District Manager Elizabeth Burghard. “Their input on recreation fee proposals is a critical step in collecting fees to help operate, maintain and improve popular recreation sites,” continued Burghard.

The meeting runs from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. each day.  The meetings are open to the public, with a  comment period scheduled for 2:00 p.m. on June 24.  Individuals who want to make a statement during the public comment period are encouraged to also submit a written copy of their statement at the meeting for the administrative record.

To participate in the meeting, please register: https://blm.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_1ybd8Yr-RheOXXOgvDCe_Q or contact Kyle Sullivan, RAC Coordinator, ksullivan@blm.gov or at (541) 618-2340.

The Western Oregon RAC meets multiple times a year and is one of six citizen advisory councils throughout Oregon/Washington. The RAC’s 15 members are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior and represent a broad range of public land interests, including environmental, local government, recreation, timber, and commercial activity. The Western Oregon RAC advises the BLM’s Coos Bay, Medford, Roseburg, Northwest Districts, and parts of the Lakeview District.

For more information about the Western Oregon RAC, visit:

https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington

###

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people.?The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 

Attached Media Files: Western Oregon RAC Map
Bureau of Land Management honors Yaquina Head volunteer for "Making a Difference" - 05/26/21

Newport, Ore. — Today, the Bureau of Land Management honored Newport resident Sandy Hayden for her outstanding achievement as a volunteer at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area. The recognition was part of the 2021 Making a Difference National Volunteer Awards ceremony. Volunteers like Hayden play a critical role in helping the BLM welcome millions of visitors annually to more than 245 million acres of public land across the American West.

“I’m continually humbled by the contributions made by all of our volunteers,” said Barry Bushue, BLM Oregon/Washington State Director. “Sandy’s hard work and enthusiasm have made a lasting impact on our public lands and on those who come to visit.”

Hayden was one of six honorees at the annual ceremony, which recognized exceptional volunteer service on BLM-administered lands. The award was presented via a live video teleconference from BLM Headquarters.

Since 2015, Hayden has been a dedicated volunteer at Yaquina Head, putting her green thumb and passion for plants to good use in service of American public lands.

“Sandy’s contributions have been exemplary and represent the true spirit of American conservation,” said Matthew Betenson, manager of Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area.

The Outstanding Natural Area is a National Conservation Lands site along the Oregon coast. Formed by ancient lava flows, Yaquina Head’s hard basalt cliffs and coves have been shaped by pounding ocean surf for 14 million years. Visitors can view abundant wildlife such as whales, harbor seals and seabirds from the many breath-taking vantage points around the 100-acre site.

The BLM manages outstanding lands like these for the benefit of current and future generations, supporting conservation as a part of the BLM's multiple-use mission. One of the BLM's highest priorities is to promote ecosystem health, and one of the greatest obstacles to achieving this goal is the rapid expansion of weeds across public lands. Invasive plants can dominate and often cause permanent damage to native plant communities. If not eradicated or controlled, noxious weeds will continue to jeopardize the health of the public lands and to constrain the myriad activities that occur there.

Invasive plants gained a strong foothold at Yaquina Head after use as a lighthouse in the 19th century and a quarry in the 20th century, but the site is 80 miles away from the nearest BLM botanist. In order to control the spread of invasive plants at the site, the BLM needed the help of volunteers.

Heeding the call, Hayden met with BLM botanists and quickly mastered the list of non-native and invasive plants prioritized for removal. Using hand tools and hard work, she has removed truckloads of invasive Himalaya blackberry, tansy ragwort, English ivy, and other invasives. While the BLM does not keep an official count of the volume of invasive vegetation removed, weeds collected by Hayden over two weeks once weighed in at more than 300 pounds.

In addition to removing nuisance plants, Hayden has put her green thumb to work in support of the historic lighthouse keeper’s garden, which harbors period appropriate heirloom vegetables and herbs. When school groups visit the site early in the growing season, Hayden helps students transplant sprouts into the raised beds. She tends the garden throughout the season, ensuring that weeds do not impede the growth of the heirloom vegetables and herbs. The final harvest, 95 pounds of food collected with the assistance of National Public Lands Day volunteers, was donated to a local food bank.

Hayden continues to educate herself and to work with BLM specialists to stay up to date on priorities and ensure that she only removes non-native plants, making room for native plants to thrive. She consistently demonstrates initiative and independent work to ensure these conservation lands remain healthy for current and future generations.

For more information on Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, visit: https://www.blm.gov/learn/interpretive-centers/yaquina

For more information on volunteering with the BLM, visit: https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/volunteers

For more information on National Conservation Lands, visit: https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands

 

-BLM-

 

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people.?The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 

Bureau of Land Management provides tips for responsible recreation - 05/25/21

Portland, Ore — Memorial Day weekend is a popular time for visitors to enjoy their public lands, and, this year, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is providing tips for safe and responsible recreation.

The BLM encourages visitors to be aware of public health guidance and to be stewards of public lands every time you visit:

  • Know and follow Federal, state, and local public health guidance as well as guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Come prepared, be flexible, and have a plan “B” if the area is crowded. For COVID-19 information relating to BLM-administered public lands in Oregon and Washington, please visit: https://www.blm.gov/oregon-washington/covid-access-restrictions.
     
  • Protect natural and cultural resources on public lands and be respectful of other users and neighboring communities. 
     
  • Practice Leave No Trace principles and leave your public lands cleaner than you found them.  
     
  • Avoid unnecessary risks while recreating to prevent overwhelming hospitals and clinics. Bring a first aid kit, know the location of your nearest clinic or hospital, and be prepared for emergencies. 

Additionally, the Pacific Northwest is facing dry weather conditions with little precipitation recorded this spring. This means it is important for visitors to be mindful of wildfire potential:

  • Follow fire restrictions in every area you visit to prevent human-caused wildfires. Fire restrictions for BLM-administered lands in Oregon and Washington can be found at https://www.blm.gov/orwafire.
     
  • Respect post-fire closure areas that remain in effect from the 2020 fire season. Due to the large burn areas, many locations impacted by last year’s fires are still closed for safety. For more information go to:
    https://www.blm.gov/orwafire and https://wildfire.oregon.gov/Pages/Recreation-Impacts.aspx
     
  • Avoid activities that may cause fire or create sparks. Remember, fireworks, exploding targets, and metal targets are not allowed on BLM-administered public lands in Oregon and Washington.
     
  • Ensure your campfire or grill is cool to the touch before you leave. Use the “drown, stir, and feel” method, and do not leave until the site is cold to the touch.

“Public lands across the country are seeing an increase in visitor use and it is more important than ever for visitors to do their part to protect and preserve America’s public lands,” said BLM Oregon/Washington State Director Barry Bushue. “We are asking visitors to be stewards of their public lands every time you visit. Be careful with fire, be aware of fire restrictions or closures, and pack out everything with you when you leave.”

For more safety tips, visit https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/know-before-you-go

 

-BLM-

 

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people.?The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

Steens Mountain Advisory Council schedules June 2021 Videoconference - 05/24/21

Hines, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management announced today that the Steens Mountain Advisory Council has scheduled a spring virtual meeting. The public is welcome to attend online, Thursday, June 3, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Visit the Steens Mountain Advisory Council website at https://on.doi.gov/3jWrWSn for guidance on how to access the videoconference.

The June 3 agenda includes an update from the designated federal official; a report on recreation, visitor use, and law enforcement statistics and data from the 2020 season; a presentation and discussion on the Nature’s Advocate Inholder Access Environmental Assessment and proposed routes; information sharing about the Bridge Creek Area Allotment Management Plans; an update from SMAC members regarding their Inholder Initiative; and an opportunity for SMAC members to share information from their constituents and present research. Any other matters that may reasonably come before the SMAC may also be included.

"The SMAC is a forum for the community to participate in the land management process,” said Jeff Rose, Burns District manager and designated federal official for the SMAC. “If you are interested in public land decisions for Steens Mountain, this is a great opportunity to listen and share with a collaborative group,” continued Rose.

A public comment period will be available at 1:35 p.m. Unless otherwise approved by the subcommittee chair, the public comment period will last no longer than 30 minutes, and each speaker may address the subcommittee for a maximum of five minutes.
Sessions may end early if all business items are accomplished ahead of schedule or may be extended if discussions warrant more time.

For more information about the Steens Mountain Advisory Council, please contact Tara Thissell at
(541) 573-4519 or tthissell@blm.gov. Additional information about the Steens Mountain Advisory Council is available online at https://on.doi.gov/3jWrWSn.

 

−BLM–

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

Prineville Bureau of Land Management Selling Online Firewood Permits - 05/20/21

PRINEVILLE, Ore. —  The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Deschutes Field Office has added an online option for purchasing firewood-cutting permits for the Williamson Creek juniper firewood-cutting area. In addition to purchasing a permit by calling the Prineville District office at 541-416-6700 or buying from a local vendor, woodcutters may now purchase a permit 24 hours a day, seven days a week through the BLM Special Forest Products Online Permit Sales Program. Online permits will be available beginning June 1, while in-person permits may be purchased now. Unlike other firewood cutting areas identified in the annual synopsis, the Williamson Creek unit does not open for cutting until June 1, 2021.

Please note these online permits are only valid on BLM-administered lands described within the permit. Other jurisdictions within the synopsis require an interagency permit purchased from a vendor or a local BLM or Forest Service office. Woodcutters without the ability to print their permit should continue to purchase permits directly from a local office or vendor.

The cost is $10 per cord. There is a two-cord minimum purchase for every transaction, and a maximum of four cords may be bought per household each year. A cord is defined as a stack of split wood four feet wide by four feet high by eight feet in length.

Woodcutters are required to comply with all permit terms and conditions. This includes following any Industrial Fire Precaution Level restrictions in effect during periods of elevated wildfire danger. Permits are authorized for use only on BLM-managed lands and may not be transferred to another party. Each permit must be validated and attached to the load in a visible location before any cut wood is transported.

To purchase a permit online:

  1. Go to https://forestproducts.blm.gov/.
  2. Click on Oregon, select the Deschutes Field Office, and then select Fuelwood.
  3. Complete and submit the application.
  4. Enter your credit/debit card information. Your payment will be processed within minutes, and you will then print your permit.

You will also receive an email with all the maps, stipulations, load tags, and documentation that you will need to cut and remove products from BLM land safely. All purchased permits are final; no refunds will be granted.

To purchase a permit over the telephone using a credit/debit card, please call the Prineville BLM at 541-416-6700. Office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Firewood availability may become low as the season progresses. Please make sure to check available wood conditions prior to purchasing a permit. This can be done by either calling the BLM office or driving out before purchasing a permit. For more information about personal-use fuelwood permits, please call the BLM at 541-416-6700. For more information on the special forest products online permit program, go to https://forestproducts.blm.gov/.

-BLM-

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people.?The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 

Annual campfire restrictions to start on BLM rivers in Central Oregon - 05/20/21

Central Oregon — Annual campfire restrictions will go into effect June 1, 2021 on portions of the Deschutes, John Day, White and Crooked Rivers, as well as on BLM-administered lands along Lake Billy Chinook.

Reducing the risk of wildfire helps BLM be a good neighbor in the river canyons, while facilitating commercial recreation and multiple-use opportunities. The number one goal of the BLM is promoting employee and public safety, and the river canyons present a combination of limited access, grassy fuels that dry out quickly, and steep slopes that allow wildfires to spread rapidly.

Under these restrictions, commercially manufactured lanterns and metal camp stoves used for cooking are allowed, when fueled with bottled propane or liquid fuel and operated in a responsible manner. The river fire closures prohibit building, igniting, maintaining, attending, using, tending, or being within 20 feet of a campfire, charcoal fire, or any other type of open flame.

This closure also bans the use of portable propane campfires and wood pellet burning devices and restricts areas where visitors can smoke to non-public buildings, inside vehicles, in boats on the water, or while standing in the water.

The specific campfire closure locations apply to BLM-administered lands in the following areas:

  • Within ½ mile of the Crooked River’s edge from the Highway 97 bridge to Lake Billy Chinook.
  • Within ½ mile of the Deschutes River’s edge from the Highway 20 bridge to Lake Billy Chinook.
  • Within ½ mile of Lake Simtustus (located between Round Butte Dam and Pelton Dam).
  • Within the Lower Deschutes National Wild and Scenic River corridor, which extends from Pelton Dam to the Columbia River.
  • Within ½ mile of Lake Billy Chinook, including the BLM Beach dispersed recreation site located ½ mile east of the Three Rivers Recreation Area on the south shore of the Metolius Arm of the lake.
  • Within ½ mile of the White River’s edge from its confluence with the Deschutes River upstream to the eastern boundary of the Mt. Hood National Forest.
  • The Mainstem John Day River from Tumwater Falls (River Mile 10) upstream to Kimberly (RM 185).
  • The North Fork John Day River, from the confluence with the Mainstem at Kimberly (RM 0) upstream to the Umatilla National Forest boundary (RM 62).
  • The South Fork John Day River from Smokey Creek (RM 6) upstream to the Malheur Forest (RM 47).

Closures on the Lower Deschutes, White, and Crooked Rivers and Lake Billy Chinook are in effect until October 15, 2021; while closures on the John Day River remain in effect until September 30, 2021. Except in emergency conditions or with permission by an agency authorized officer, there are no exceptions to this closure. A violation of this closure is punishable by a fine of not more than $1,000 or imprisonment of not more than 12 months, or both.

For more information about these closures, or other fire restrictions on BLM-administered lands in central Oregon, please call the Prineville BLM District Office at (541) 416-6700 or visit https://www.blm.gov/orwafire. For current information on public use restrictions, fire closures or changes to the Industrial Fire Precaution Level on the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests and the Prineville BLM, please call the information line at 1-800-523-4737. Additional information about fire activity in Oregon/Washington is available online at: https://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/.

-BLM-

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people. The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 

The Bureau of Land Management to hold virtual hearing on use of motorized vehicles for wild horse and burro management - 05/17/21

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will conduct a virtual public hearing regarding the use of motorized vehicles and aircraft in the management of wild horses and burros on public lands. The hearing is scheduled for May 25, from 3 to 5 p.m. MT and will be held using Zoom video conferencing technology and live-streamed at BLM.gov/live.

An annual public hearing is required by the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 to consider the use of motorized vehicles and aircraft in gather operations, population inventory efforts, and in the transportation of animals to/from corrals, pastures, and adoption, sale and transfer events.

To provide comment during the virtual public hearing, members of the public may register in advance by May 22 at https://blm.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_45qS9QqsTPOEh96NU_lO6Q. Written comments may also be sent in advance of the hearing to LM_HQ_MotorizedVehicleHearing@blm.gov">BLM_HQ_MotorizedVehicleHearing@blm.gov. Please include ‘‘Motorized Vehicle Comment’’ in the subject line of the email. Comments must be submitted by 5 p.m. Mountain Time on May 24.

For additional information regarding the public hearing, please contact Dorothea Boothe, Wild Horse and Burro Program Coordinator, at (602) 906-5543 or at oothe@blm.gov">dboothe@blm.gov. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may reach Ms. Boothe during normal business hours by calling the Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339.

The BLM manages and protects wild horses and burros across 26.9 million acres of public lands in 10 Western states. More information on the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program can be found at BLM.gov/whb.

-BLM-

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people. The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.