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Learn about the Portland Metro Community Resource Network - 07/23/21

July 23, 2021
Contact: Christine Stone, istine.l.stone@dhsoha.state.or.us">christine.l.stone@dhsoha.state.or.us; 503-602-8027

For media inquiries please contact: info@pdxcrn.org or call 503-313-8479

Learn about the Portland Metro Community Resource Network

The public is invited to a virtual community forum for the Tri-County area Thursday, July 29 to learn more about the newly formed Portland Metro Community Resource Network (PDX CRN) serving Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties. People can learn about how the CRN has been used in other counties and how it can serve the Portland area. Everyone is welcome to attend. 

The PDX CRN aligns services, connects resources to fill unmet needs for community members and accelerates impact by utilizing private sector innovation, leveraging public sector resources and mobilizing existing networks.

 

See www.pdxcrn.org for more information or register below.

 

 

More about the CRN

The CRN is comprised of public bodies, non-profits, for-profit businesses, Tribes, faith organizations, philanthropists, and individuals. When a member becomes aware of a need it is posted on the CRN. No personally identifiable information about the client or customer is listed, just the basics about the need. 

 

This event is organized in partnership with the Oregon Department of Human Services and Oregon Health Authority; Event hosted by BESThq (www.BESThq.net), collaborative business community.

 

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Oregon P-EBT Card
Oregon P-EBT Card
Oregon will begin issuing Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) food benefits beginning on July 22 - 07/16/21

Need to know:

  • Starting July 22, P-EBT food benefits will be issued to families whose children did not have access to free or reduced-price meals usually provided at school or childcare during the 2020 – 2021 school year because of COVID-19.
  • P-EBT cards will be mailed to families from a return address in South Dakota.
  • P-EBT food benefits can be used to purchase food anywhere that EBT is accepted.
  • P-EBT cards look different than the Oregon Trail Cards issued to SNAP households.

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) will begin issuing  Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) food benefits on July 22. 

P-EBT provides food benefits to families whose children did not have access to the free or reduced-priced meals usually provided at school or childcare centers. Oregon was approved to provide retroactive food benefits to eligible students for the 2020-21 school year.

P-EBT food benefits can be used to purchase food anywhere that EBT is accepted.

Two ways children receive P-EBT

Children receiving P-EBT will receive a letter notifying them of their benefits and P-EBT case ID number.

There are two ways children receive benefits:

  • If the child’s household currently participates in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), their P-EBT benefits will be deposited into the household’s SNAP account.
  • Those who do not particiapte in SNAP will receive a P-EBT card in the mail to the address on file with the school. P-EBT cards look different than the Oregon Trail Cards issued to SNAP households.

From July 22 to July 29, P-EBT cards and benefits will be issued to students.

P-EBT teams will mailed to families from a return address in South Dakota.

It is important for families who are expecting to receive P-EBT to open all mail with a return address from South Dakota as soon as they receive it.

If you are expecting P-EBT and have not received the benefits by Aug. 15th, please contact ODHS by emailing t.schoolmeals@dhsoha.state.or.us">ebt.schoolmeals@dhsoha.state.or.us or by calling 503-945-6481.

P-EBT benefits also will be issued in August and September on the same schedule as July.

ODHS and ODE share responsibility in ensuring that children across Oregon receive P-EBT food benefits. ODE collaborates with school districts across Oregon to determine eligibility and ODHS issues the benefits on Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards.

P-EBT does not replace any child nutrition program already offered, and families are encouraged to continue participating in grab-n-go-meals or emergency food programs at their local schools and community locations.

P-EBT is separate from SNAP benefits including emergency allotments that are also being issued due to the impact of COVID-19. P-EBT benefits are not considered in a public charge test.

For additional information about P-EBT visit pebt.oregon.gov

Resources to help meet basic needs

About SNAP

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.

About the Oregon Department of Education

The Oregon Department of Education fosters equity and excellence for every learner through collaboration with educators, partners, and communities. ODE oversees the education of over 560,000 students in Oregon’s public K-12 education system. While ODE isn’t in the classroom directly providing services, the agency (along with the State Board) - focuses on helping districts achieve both local and statewide goals and priorities through strategies such as:

  • Developing policies and standards
  • Providing accurate and timely data to inform instruction
  • Training teachers on how to use data effectively
  • Effectively administering numerous state and federal grants
  • Sharing and helping districts implement best practices

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Attached Media Files: Oregon P-EBT Card
Public notice and request for comment on 1915 (c) #0375 adult waiver amendment - 07/16/21

(Salem, Ore.) -- The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Developmental Disabilities Services is seeking public comment regarding the 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver amendment.

The 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver amendment is requesting to:

  • Update references from DHS to ODHS and adding Oregon to Department of Human Services throughout the waiver application.
  • Update language regarding the OHA review of ODDS quality assurance reports.
  • Update language regarding risks to be consistent throughout the waiver application.
  • Update language in performance measures.
  • Update references to the Continuous Improvement Committee to reflect current practice.
  • When an emergency has been determined by ODDS, allow face-to-face requirements for service planning meetings to be waived and signatures of service plans to be verbally or by email.
  • Remove requirement for post-eligibility treatment of income for people living in their own home. 

The proposed 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver amendment is online at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Compass-Project-Waivers-Rules-Policy.aspx

Print versions of the waivers are posted in local Community Developmental Disabilities Programs (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/county-programs.aspx) and Support Services Brokerages (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Support-Services-Brokerages.aspx). Print versions may also be obtained from Joli Schroader, Medicaid Waiver/State Plan Analyst, 503-507-2083, .schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us">joli.r.schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Interested parties are asked to submit comments via one of two methods: Send an email to odds.info@state.or.us or send written comments addressed to ODDS Medicaid Waiver/State Plan Analyst, 500 Summer Street NE E-09, Salem, OR 97301.

Deadline for comments is August 26, 2021. Mail responses must be received by this date in order to be considered. 

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Public input sought on plan to expand Oregon Project Independence, create Family Caregiver Assistance Program - 07/15/21

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) is seeking public input by August 15, 2021, on its plan to apply for Medicaid funding to expand Oregon Project Independence and create a Family Caregiver Assistance Program. Both programs serve older adults and people with disabilities.

The application, which is being made through the Oregon Health Authority to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), is a 1115 demonstration waiver. The programs to be expanded are offered by the ODHS Office of Aging and People with Disabilities.

Oregon has a track record of innovating programs to serve older adults and adults with disabilities, but gaps still remain in Oregon’s system, especially for individuals with limited income. These Oregonians are at risk of requiring Medicaid when they need long-term care services and supports.

Today, nearly 800,000 Oregonians are age 65 and older. By 2030, this population is projected to increase by 25 percent. For those age 85 and older, and most at risk of needing Medicaid long term services and supports, the population is estimated to increase by 33 percent over the next 10 years, according to Oregon Office of Economic Analysis.

The 1115 demonstration waiver would provide the following service expansions with Medicaid funding beginning in July 2022 for a five-year period:

  • Oregon Project Independence would expand to serve 4,500 Oregonians, up from about 2,350 currently served. The federal matching funds will also permit local programs to serve younger adults with disabilities, whose participation has been limited to only one third of Oregon counties.

Oregon Project Independence services include case management, in home support and personal care services, adult day services, home delivered meals, assisted transportation, assistive technology, and other supports.

About $5 million in general funds that have been allocated by the Oregon Legislature for this program would not be matched. This ensures that the ODHS Office of Aging and People with Disabilities can continue to serve Oregonians who would not be eligible for the Medicaid-funded program introduced with the 1115 demonstration waiver.

  • A Family Caregiver Assistance Program would be created to support qualifying Oregonians, whose family members provide them with care in their own homes, through a combination of state and federal funds. Oregonians who receive this family support would be eligible to receive services and supports totaling no more than $500 per month, with an annual increases for inflation.

Oregonians served by this program would be able to choose from a list of services including caregiver respite, adult day services, transportation, assistive technology, caregiver training and education, and other services that the consumer finds compatible with the caregiving relationship they have with their caregiver.

This program would not replace the Older Americans Act funded Family Caregiver services. Instead, it would build on that program to serve additional individuals.

Oregonians who would like to provide comments on the application have the following options:

These sessions will be accessible to people with disabilities. Captioning and American Sign Language interpretation will be provided. For questions about accessibility, or to request an accommodation, contact eth.Jackson3@dhsoha.state.or.us">Beth.Jackson3@dhsoha.state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meetings.

UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Amadeo Landry Silguero has been found - 07/15/21

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Amadeo Landry Silguero.

Amadeo, age 15, is a child in foster care who went missing from Portland on April 2, 2021. He was found July 11, 2021.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Cash, grants available for teens and young adults who have experienced foster care - 07/15/21

Need to know:  

  • $2 million emergency cash assistance is now available to eligible young people in Oregon who experienced foster care. Young people need to apply for emergency cash assistance by September 30, 2021 at FosterClub.com/ORHelp 
  • Applications for the Expanded Chafee Educational and Training Grant for young people with foster care experience (announced in March) are due August 1, 2021, at: https://oregonstudentaid.gov/chafee-etg.aspx  

 

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division is announcing $2 million of emergency cash assistance available for some teens and young adults who experienced foster care.

Approximately 4,000 young people between the ages of 14 and 26 who experienced foster care when they were age 14 or older in Oregon, a different state or in a Tribal Nation’s Child Welfare agency may be eligible for the emergency cash assistance. 

Apply online by visiting FosterClub.com/ORHelp. Call FosterClub at 503-717-1552 for application assistance. 

“The challenges of the COVID-19 global pandemic have been especially difficult for children and young adults who have experienced foster care and who may not have stable family support,” said Child Welfare Director Rebecca Jones Gaston. “This emergency cash assistance will support access to basic needs such as housing, food security, education, mental health, transportation and other needs that have been exacerbated by the pandemic. If you experienced foster care and may be eligible, do not hesitate, apply today. If you know someone who was in foster care and believe they may be eligible, please tell them about this assistance and make sure they know how to apply as quickly as possible.”

The $2 million emergency cash assistance is part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, passed by Congress in December 2020. It included provisions to support young people with foster care experience. The Act provides federal funds to the State of Oregon to support young people who experienced foster care and who have been negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. To do this, ODHS collaborated with community partners and young people who have experienced foster care to create pandemic assistance programs earlier this year.

The first programs announced, Expanded Chafee Educational and Training Grants and Young Adult Transitional Supports, have already been launched and are still dispersing funds. The deadline to apply for the Expanded Educational and Training Grants is August 1.

Jazlyn Prater, a 20-year-old from southern Oregon who experienced foster care, learned about the Expanded Chafee Educational Training Grant on social media and applied. 

Her full request was granted, stabilizing her housing and paying tuition for her second year of college. 

“The pandemic has been hard,” said Prater. “I’d been living in a hotel for a few months and was going to have to drop out of college to get money for the repairs I needed for my RV because I had to choose- housing or college. Even though I was nervous about reaching out, the support that has been offered has been a lifeline. I can continue my studies and am taking extra classes now to graduate faster.” 

To reach as many eligible young people as possible, ODHS has contracted with FosterClub, an Oregon-based national network for young people in foster care.

FosterClub will determine eligibility for the range of pandemic relief programs created in Oregon, distribute funds, and provide peer mentors to eligible young people.  

If you or someone you know has experienced foster care (at age 14 or older) and has a financial need, you may qualify for this emergency cash assistance or other support available. To apply visit FosterClub.com/ORHelp. Call FosterClub at 503-717-1552 for application assistance.  

 

About the ODHS Child Welfare Division

The Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Division is committed to transforming itself to better support the individual needs of families and to best serve Oregon’s children and young people. Learn more about the Child Welfare Division Vision for Transformation. Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233). This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Leilia Johansen, Adisenn Proffitt, Ansen Proffitt, and Izabella Proffitt have been found - 07/06/21

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Leilia Johansen, Adisenn Proffitt, Ansen Proffitt, and Izabella Proffitt, a sibling group in foster care who were missing.

The children went missing from Portland on May 27, 2021. They were found July 2, 2021.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Increased emergency SNAP benefits continue in July - 07/06/21

Need to know

(Salem) – Most Oregonians who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits will receive emergency allotments in July. The federal government has approved emergency allotments every month since March 2020, to give SNAP recipients additional support during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In July, approximately 465,000 SNAP households will receive approximately $66.5 million in emergency allotments in addition to their regular SNAP benefits.

“We are grateful to have the opportunity to provide emergency benefits  to most SNAP households in Oregon,” said Dan Haun, director of the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Self-Sufficiency Program. “We also know that many Oregonians are still struggling to meet their basic needs due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and we encourage them contact our partners at 211 and the Oregon Food Bank for support during this difficult time.”

Emergency allotments will be available on July 13 for current SNAP households. New SNAP households will receive the emergency allotments July 30 or August 3.

SNAP recipients do not have to take any action to receive these supplemental benefits as they will be issued directly on their EBT cards.

More information about emergency allotments is available at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/About-SNAP.aspx.

Questions about your SNAP benefits should be directed to local ODHS offices or by calling the ONE Customer Service Center at 1-800-699-9075.

If you are a SNAP household and your income or the number of people in your household has changed that could impact your benefits. It is important to make sure we have the most up-to-date information.

You can report any changes to your income or household in many ways:

  • Online at: ONE.Oregon.gov
  • By mail at: ONE Customer Service Center, PO Box 14015, Salem, OR 97309
  • By fax at: 503-378-5628
  • By phone at: 1-800-699-9075 or TTY 711

Resources to help meet basic needs

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.

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New Legislation Strengthens Oregon's Commitment to Working with Tribal Nations to Preserve Tribal Families - 07/02/21

(Salem) – Changes approved by the 2021 Oregon Legislature will further efforts between Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) Child Welfare Division and Tribal Nations to protect and preserve Tribal families.  

Senate Bill 562A enhances Oregon’s historic 2020 Oregon Indian Child Welfare Act (ORICWA) by: 

  • Recognizing customary adoptions, which are adoptions that align with traditional tribal child-rearing practices. 
  • Adding Ongoing Cultural Connection and Contact Agreements after adoption or guardianship is finalized for a Tribal child, in order to support cultural connections.  
  • Requiring ODHS take certain steps when a Tribal child is relinquished or surrendered to the agency.

 

“Since ORICWA’s passage last year, we have already seen significant improvement in early and ongoing coordination and cooperation with tribes on case planning and foster placements, which in turn has improved the State’s engagement of active efforts on ICWA cases,” said Brent Leonhard, of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. “The ORICWA amendments that became law this year continue the success of ORICWA and also provide a pathway for tribal customary adoptions in child dependency cases, something that is long overdue.” 

 

Initial ORICWA legislation built upon the Federal Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) passed by Congress in 1978 to help keep Native children safe, connected to their cultural roots, and to preserve the future of tribal nations. ORICWA’s statutes are unique to the needs and experiences of Tribal Nations in Oregon.  For example, Oregon is one of the few states to now require a Ongoing Cultural Connection and Contact Agreement prior to finalizing guardianship or adoption, which is designed to ensure Tribal children do not lose their connection to their Tribe and continue to engage with cultural events and services. Now, with the legislature’s recent passage of amendments to the initial ORICWA, Oregon has further underscored the intent and clarified practice.  

 

“We are an agency committed to dismantling the structures, underlying mindsets and biases that have contributed to and continue to contribute to oppression and racialized and disparate outcomes for Tribal children and families. ORICWA presents a renewed and statewide opportunity to honor the sovereignty of Tribal Nations and to model the Spirit of ICWA in all our interactions with Tribal Nations and their communities,” said Child Welfare Director Rebecca Jones Gaston. “These are central components of the values included in the Child Welfare Division Vision for Transformation and we must continue to press toward reparation of Tribal ways, culture and rights within this state and the broader U.S. to thrive now and into the future.” 

 

Oregon is the seventh state to pass a state-based ICWA in alignment with the federal act, joining states such as Minnesota and Tennessee. Before the federal act passed in 1978, generations of Tribal children across the country were removed from their families and communities, often placed without connection to their Tribal culture. 

 

“The passage of the Oregon Indian Child Welfare Act (ORICWA) in 2020 spoke to the State of Oregon’s commitment to protecting and preserving Tribal children and families,” said Adam Becenti, ODHS Tribal Affairs Director. “The recent changes to ORICWA will now enhance how Child Welfare engages with Tribal families and strengthen partnership with Oregon Tribal Nations. This is a significant step forward in repairing historical wounds and honoring the government-to-government relationship with Tribal Nations.” 

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About the ODHS Child Welfare Division: The Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Division is committed to transforming itself to better support the individual needs of families and to best serve Oregon’s children and young people. Learn more about the Child Welfare Division Vision for Transformation. Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233). This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

 

 

 

 

Comments sought by Aug. 1 on Medicaid waivers for Oregonians receiving long-term services and supports - 06/30/21

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) will be submitting two Medicaid waiver application renewal requests to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for approval and seeks input on these applications from the public by Aug. 1, 2021. Both waivers, which will be submitted by the ODHS Office of Aging and People with Disabilities (APD), serve individuals who meet Oregon’s nursing facility level of care criteria and meet Medicaid eligibility criteria.

The first waiver, APD 1915(c) #0185 Aging and Physically Disabled Waiver, provides case management services to help individuals gain access to needed medical, social, educational, and other services. At minimum, case management must include quarterly direct contact with individuals and ongoing review to ensure needed services are being provided in accordance with the individual’s person-centered service plan.

The waiver also provides community transition services to support an individual who wants to transition from an acute care hospital or licensed care setting to an in-home setting. For individuals over the standard Medicaid income levels, monthly waivered services allow them to access all other Long-Term Services and Supports’ benefits funded through the 1915(k).

The second waiver, APD 1915(b)(4) Case Management Freedom of Choice Waiver, lets Oregon choose to contract with Area Agencies on Aging, willing Tribes, and APD offices to perform waivered case management services. This waiver ensures that ongoing case management is coordinated with all the other services provided to eligible individuals.

Members of the public are asked to send comments by Aug. 1, 2021, on these waiver applications to Beth Jackson by email to eth.Jackson3@dhsoha.state.or.us">Beth.Jackson3@dhsoha.state.or.us; by fax to 503-947-4245; or by U.S. postal mail to Beth Jackson, Office of Aging and People with Disabilities, Oregon Department of Human Services, 500 Summer St. NE; Salem, OR 97301-1079.        

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Oregon SNAP recipients who lost food due to power outages may be eligible for replacement benefits - 06/29/21

Need to know:

  • If you had to throw away food purchased with SNAP due to power outages you can apply for replacement benefits to purchase new food.
  • You must request replacement benefits within 10 calendar days of the food loss.
  • Replacement benefits may also be available if you lost food due to home damage or other natural disasters.

(Salem) – Oregonians who lost food purchased with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits due to power outages are encouraged to apply for replacement benefits with the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS).

SNAP households who lost or disposed of food that was unsafe to eat due to power outages can request SNAP replacement benefits. Replacement benefits also may be available to SNAP households who lost food due to home damage.

Replacement benefits must be requested within 10 calendar days of the food loss by:

Once approved, replacement benefits are added to the households existing Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card.

?Resources to help meet basic needs

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at benefits.oregon.gov. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.

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Attached Media Files: Graphic 2 , Graphic 1
Amadeo Landry Silguero
Amadeo Landry Silguero
Missing child alert -- Amadeo Landry Silguero is missing and believed to be in danger - 06/25/21

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Amadeo Landry Silguero, age 15, a child in foster care who went missing from Portland on April 2, 2021. He is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find him and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see him.

Amadeo is suspected to be in the Gresham area and may frequent the Clackamas Town Center.

Name: Amadeo Landry Silguero
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: May 4, 2006
Height: 5-foot-9
Weight: 150 pounds
Hair: Brown
Eye color: Brown
Clackamas County Missing Person Case #21-6804
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1424042

Anyone who suspects they have information about Amadeo’s location should call 911 or local law enforcement.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Attached Media Files: Amadeo Landry Silguero
Disability rights activist Judy Heumann kicks off webinar series in recognition of ADA anniversary - 06/24/21

SALEM, Ore. – Disability rights activist Judy Heumann, recently featured in the Oscar-nominated documentary “Crip Camp,” on July 6 will kick off a series of weekly Lunch and Learn webinar sessions in recognition of the 31st anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Hosted by the Oregon Disabilities Commission and the Northwest ADA Center, these free weekly sessions will be held virtually to allow more Oregonians to have access to this important information.

In addition to Huemann, the series will feature top accessibility advocates as well as equity and crisis experts. Among them are Russell Lehmann, an award-winning and internationally recognized motivational speaker, and poet; Sabine Rear, an artist, speaker, educator, and user of assistive technology who also serves as the Oregon representative of the Northwest ADA Center; Erin Taylor, health promotion coordinator for the OHSU Oregon Office on Disability and Health and for the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities; and Rebecca Bolante, director of Bolante.NET, which provides training on dealing with critical events. These experts will cover a broad range of issues in their talks including behavioral health; equity with a focus on intersectionality, the social construction of disabilities and disability justice; and emergency planning including equity issues that surfaced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The topics will be useful to people who aren’t familiar with the ADA and to those who have been involved since the beginning,” said Jim Davis of the Oregon Disabilities Commission, who will co-lead a session on behavioral health. “The information provided will also include advice and tips on accessibility topics that will be useful to all Oregonians.”

Heumann is an internationally recognized leader and author focused on disability rights. Her memoir, “Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of a Disability Rights Activist,” chronicles her efforts in the disability civil rights movement. She is also featured in the film “Crip Camp,” which chronicles how a group of teens in the 1970s helped sparked the disability rights movement.

Heumann has also played a role in the development and implementation of major legislation including the IDEA, Section 504, the Americans with Disability Act and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

She was recently profiled in an article in the Washington Post, in which she was called “the mother of the disability rights movement.”

Heumann’s session is the first of four free weekly Lunch and Learn sessions. The topics and schedule for the July events, all of which will be from noon to 1 p.m., are as follows:

Tuesday, July 6

History of the ADA & Section 504

Judy Heumann, disability rights activist and author

Tuesday, July 13 

Behavioral Health

Russell Lehmann, award-winning and internationally recognized motivational speaker, and poet; Jim Davis, Oregon Disabilities Commission (ODC) chair as well as a psychologist, gerontologist, educator, and advocate; and Randy Samuelson, ODC commissioner and executive director of the HASL Center for Independent Living

Tuesday, July 20: 

Equity: Intersectionality, Social Construction of Disabilities, & Disability Justice

Erin Taylor of the OHSU Oregon Office on Disability and Health and the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities; Sabine Rear, the Oregon representative of the Northwest ADA Center who is also an artist, speaker and educator; Missy Elliott, service equity manager for the Oregon Department of Human Services Office of Developmental Disabilities Services; and Nicole Burdsall, of the Oregon Department of Human Services Office of Aging and People with Disabilities

Tuesday, July 27

Inclusive Emergency Planning & COVID-19 Equity

Rebecca Bolante, director of Bolante.NET; Mandie Pritchard of Bolante.NET; Glenna Hayes, UCP Connections; and Tom Stenson, Disability Rights Oregon

Registration for the Lunch and Learn series is available at this website: https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJIsfu6qpzotH3CyEAc-2enJeGkRLXPJVBI

These sessions will be accessible to people with disabilities. Captioning and American Sign Language interpretation will be provided. For questions about accessibility, or to request an accommodation, please contact egonDisabilities.Commission@dhsoha.state.or.us">OregonDisabilities.Commission@dhsoha.state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meetings.

About the event sponsors:

The Oregon Disabilities Commission is charged by state statute to advise the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on issues related to achieving the full economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. ODC also acts as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations serving individuals with disabilities.

The Northwest ADA Center is funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), and is part of the ADA National Network. The ADA National Network Centers are a national platform of ten centers comprised of ADA professionals and experts charged with assisting businesses, state and local governments, and people with disabilities as they manage the process of changing our culture to be user friendly to disability and the effect the variety of health conditions can have on society.

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