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News Releases
DeYoung photo
DeYoung photo
*Update* Suspect Arrested - FBI and Curry County Sheriff's Office Ask Public's Help in Finding Attempted Aggravated Murder Fugitive (Photo) - 02/16/18

From the Curry County Sheriff's Office:


On 02-15-18 at about 9:38pm Pacific Time, Lucas DeYoung was taken into custody by the Nevada State Highway Patrol on the Curry County and FBI warrants for his arrest. DeYoung was lodged in the Humboldt County Jail in Winnemucca, Nevada.

On 02-15-18 at about 12:15pm, the Curry County Sheriff's Office received information from a concerned citizen that DeYoung was calling and harassing them, and, through some investigative leads, it was determined that DeYoung was either in Utah or Nevada. Dispatch started notifying all law enforcement agencies in those areas to attempt to locate DeYoung.

The Nevada Highway Patrol saw a vehicle with Virginia plates parked alongside the road on I-80 near milepost 164 in Nevada with a male sleeping in the driver's seat. The NHP contacted the person inside who fit the description provided by the FBI warrants as DeYoung. The driver initially gave a different name but it was determined that the driver was in fact Lucas DeYoung, and he was taken into custody without incident. The NHP also charged DeYoung with being a felon in possession of firearms.

The Curry County District Attorney's Office will work with the State of Nevada to return DeYoung to Oregon.

********

The FBI is now offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the arrest of Lucas Randall DeYoung. Anyone with information about DeYoung's location should contact their local FBI office or submit a tip via https://tips.fbi.gov. In Oregon, call the FBI in Medford at (541) 773-2942, the FBI in Portland at (503) 224-4181 or the Curry County Sheriff's Office at (541) 247-3243.

*******

The FBI and the Curry County Sheriff's Office are asking for the public's help in locating Lucas Randall DeYoung of Brookings, Oregon. On February 1, 2018, the FBI obtained a federal fugitive warrant charging DeYoung, age 36, with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. The Curry County Sheriff's Office had previously charged DeYoung with attempted aggravated murder, attempted murder, delivery of a controlled substance and unlawful manufacture of marijuana in relation to the shooting of a Curry County man on December 28, 2017.

The FBI has posted DeYoung's FBI Wanted flyer at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/additional/lucas-randall-deyoung. The FBI is also running Facebook ads featuring the fugitive hunt for DeYoung in Oregon, Washington, Virginia and Nevada. (Both the flyer and the Facebook ad are attached.)

DeYoung is described as:

White man
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brown
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 190 pounds
Other: Scar on his left finger and tattoos on his back and right shoulder

DeYoung is a known to use illegal drugs and carry firearms. He is also a known gambler. DeYoung may have travelled to the Mason County/Thurston County areas of Washington State, Virginia or Las Vegas, Nevada.

He should be considered armed and dangerous.

Anyone with information about DeYoung's location should contact their local FBI office or submit a tip via https://tips.fbi.gov. In Oregon, call the FBI in Medford at (541) 773-2942, the FBI in Portland at (503) 224-4181 or the Curry County Sheriff's Office at (541) 247-3243.

###

Tech Tuesday Tips
Tech Tuesday Tips
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Romance Scams (Photo) + audio file - 02/13/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against romance scams.

Valentines Day can bring dreams of red roses and romantic dinners, but for those looking for love, this day can also bring a new round of angst and heartache. This sets up the perfect opportunity for fraudsters to play Cupid.

Anyone can fall victim to this scammer, but most commonly he is going to target women over 40 who are widowed, divorced or disabled. It usually starts with an innocent-enough-sounding contact online. He's likely been watching your social media accounts or gleaned info out of an online dating profile. Amazingly, he likes what you like -- whether that's books, music, sports or whatever. Over time, he starts communicating with you by email or text. He starts calling, and you have long conversations about your life, your future, your love.

And then comes the kicker -- he asks you for money. It may take weeks or months to get to this point -- but just know that he needs the money desperately. He needs it to finish a job so he can come see you. He needs to buy a plane ticket. He is in the military and getting ready to retire or relocate, but he needs cash for moving expenses. Business partners are trying to steal his company, and he must hire a lawyer. There's always some urgent need -- and then another and another. He promises to pay you back soon, but he never does.

It's hard to give up on the love of your life and the future he promised you, but this fraudster won't stop until you do. So what are some warning signs? Be wary if:

* He presses you to leave a dating website where you met to communicate solely through email or instant messaging.

* He sends you a photo that looks like a glamour shot out of a magazine.

* He professes love quickly and tries to isolate you from friends and family.

* He claims to be working and living far away -- whether that's on the other side of the country or overseas.

* Makes plans to visit you but then always has to cancel because of some emergency.

* He asks for money or your help moving money.

And it's the money that's really at the heart of all this. If you are diving into an online relationship, the most important thing you should know is to never, ever send money to someone you met online. Likewise, never send compromising photos or videos with which he can later use to blackmail you. As added protection, only use dating websites with nationally-known reputations and make sure to research this new love's pictures and profile using online search tools. You want to make sure he didn't spoof someone else's profile -- or be using the same pitch with multiple victims at once.

Bottom line: online dating can lead to life-long relationships, but make sure you go into virtual relationships with two feet firmly planted in reality.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, be sure to report it to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

TT - Ransomware personal
TT - Ransomware personal
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Ransomware at Home (Photo) - 02/06/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against ransomware attacks at home.

Last week, we talked about the threat ransomware poses to small and medium-sized businesses in Oregon. They are particularly vulnerable because they often don't have the staff or the experience to prepare for or recover from such attacks.

This week, we talk about the dangers that the average person faces from ransomware at home.

The set-up scenario is the same: the fraudster either gets you to click on a bogus link or attachment in your email to download malware onto your system -- or he is "seeding" legitimate websites with the malware. Either way, this malicious software takes over your system and locks it. You risk losing access to precious family photos, financial information and more.

In a twist to this -- there is reporting that some Apple devices are getting hijacked in a similar scheme. In this case, the bad guys are using stolen iCloud passwords obtained in one of the many large-scale data breaches. They can access your iCloud account, change your password and use the "Find my iPhone" service to lock you out if you don't pay the ransom. They may even be able to wipe your system remotely.

Whether locked by ransomware or hijacked by hackers - protecting your data requires a good digital defense.

* Make sure that you regularly make offline back-ups of all of your computers, phones or other devices. Disconnect them backups - both virtually and physically -- from your main systems.

* Use high-quality antivirus and anti-malware software appropriate to your devices and make sure to enable automatic updates on them.

* Make sure your devices have the latest operating software updates and set those updates to load automatically if you can.

* Use two-factor authentication when possible. This means the hacker would need more than just your password and user ID to access your system -- he would also need something like a one-time code that is sent directly to your phone.

* If you are attacked and don't have back-ups, look for reputable information being put out by the device manufacturers and industry experts. It is possible that someone has come up with a solution that will help you figure out how to disengage from a particular ransomware strain.

* Finally, the FBI recommends never paying the ransom as there is no guarantee that the scammer will send you the decryption key. Beyond that, the money you pay may be used to fund organized crime activity or acts of terrorism while encouraging future criminal activity by these cyber thieves.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, be sure to report it to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

USB - outside
USB - outside
FBI and Scappoose Police Search For Bank Robber - Update with up to $10,000 Reward & Photos (+ corrected height) (Photo) - 01/30/18

Investigators believe the man responsible for today's Scappoose bank robbery is the "Froggy Robber," now wanted in a total of five bank robberies. The FBI recently offered a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to his identification, arrest and conviction. The FBI Wanted poster for Froggy Robber can be found at: https://bankrobbers.fbi.gov/robbers-container/2017-10-25.8983125421

The other four robberies include:

On October 19, 2017, at approximately 10:15 a.m., the Columbia Bank located at 1455 Southeast 1st Avenue in Canby, Oregon, was robbed by an unknown male suspect. The suspect approached the teller counter, jumped the counter, and threatened employees with a knife while taking the money from all of the teller drawers. The unknown suspect then fled on foot.

On November 27, 2017, at approximately 11:06 a.m., an unknown male suspect entered the Albina Community Bank located at 2002 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. Portland, Oregon, approached the teller counter, jumped over the counter, and robbed the tellers at knifepoint. The suspect then fled on foot.

On December 27, 2017, at approximately 11:00 a.m., an unknown male suspect entered the Wells Fargo Bank located at 8699 SW Main St, Wilsonville, Oregon, approached the teller counter, jumped over it, and robbed the tellers at knifepoint. The suspect then fled on foot.

On January 11, 2018, at approximately 10:00 a.m., an unknown male suspect entered the Wells Fargo Bank located at 6785 Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy, Beaverton, Oregon, approached the teller counter, jumped over it, and robbed the tellers at knifepoint. The suspect then fled on foot.


Also note corrected height: should read 5'3" to 5'5"

***************
The FBI, Scappoose Police Department, and multiple law enforcement agencies around the region responded to a bank robbery at the US Bank branch located at 52313 Columbia River Hwy in Scappoose, Oregon this morning. During the course of the robbery, witnesses say the robber jumped the teller counter and threatened bank employees with a knife, demanded cash, received cash and left the bank.

Reports that the suspect may have taken a school bus as a getaway vehicle are INACCURATE. Scappoose authorities have accounted for all school buses and all drivers.

Witnesses describe the bank robber as a Hispanic man, approximately 20-40 years of age, 5'3" - 5'5", about 160 pounds. Suspect was wearing blue pants with a blue hoodie and black shoes. Suspect is considered armed and dangerous. If you see the suspect or have any information on the suspect's location, call the FBI at 503-224-4181 or 911.

TT - Ransomware business
TT - Ransomware business
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Ransomware Targeting Businesses (Photo) - 01/30/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against ransomware attacks that impact your business.

Even if it hasn't already happened to you or your company -- you probably know someone who has experienced a ransomware attack. They can be devastating to any business -- whether a Fortune 500 corporation or a mom-and-pop local store. Hospitals and government agencies - including school districts, university systems, police departments, cities and counties -- are all potentially vulnerable as well.

In the past, the attack often started with a phishing email -- that's phishing with a "ph". The fraudster would send you or a co-worker what appeared to be a legitimate looking email with a link to a website, an invoice or other document. Once you clicked, you would have now downloaded malware onto your system. As with everything, this scam is growing more sophisticated as fraudsters figure out how to evade email security systems. To that end, the FBI is now seeing cases where fraudsters are avoiding email all together and embedding the malware onto legitimate websites that businesses are likely to use.

Regardless of how the malware got onto your system, it starts to encrypt the files on your computer, and -- depending on how your network is set up -- can travel throughout the system to infect and encrypt all your company's files. The malware can often also travel to your cloud-based back-ups and encrypt them, too. The scammers will demand payment -- often in bitcoin or virtual currency -- to maybe unlock your data.

Needless to say -- the damage can be devastating. In Oregon, the FBI has particular concerns about the ability of small and medium-sized businesses' ability to recover if they lose access to customer files and sensitive data.

In this case, a good offense starts with a strong digital defense.

* Make sure that you regularly make offline back-ups of all of your company's critical data so that you can reconstitute your business right away. Ensure that these backups are completely segregated -- both virtually and physically -- from your day-to-day operations.

* Educate your employees about good prevention -- especially when it comes to identifying and mitigating phishing attacks.

* Patch operating systems, software and firmware on your digital devices to ensure that they have the latest protections.

* Limit those who have admin access to your system.

* Ensure that antivirus and anti-malware solutions are enabled and set to update automatically.

* Implement software controls to prevent programs from executing from areas where ransomware tends to lurk (such as temporary folders supporting popular internet browsers).

* Finally, the FBI recommends never paying the ransom as there is no guarantee that the scammer will return your data to you. Beyond that, the money you pay may be used to fund organized crime activity or acts of terrorism while encouraging future criminal activity by these cyber thieves.

Next week, we will look at the ransomware risks you face with your personal devices at home.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, be sure to report it to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

TT - Deceased Scam
TT - Deceased Scam
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Scams Targeting the Deceased (Photo) - 01/23/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against scams targeting your recently-passed relatives.

The death of a loved one can take an enormous toll -- physically, emotionally and even financially. Beyond that, there are online scammers who will try to cash in on your already-difficult situation.

The fraudster could try to open new credit cards in the deceased person's name or use a phishing scheme to pressure a grieving spouse into paying for a bogus benefit. Perhaps he says that he is calling from an insurance company and is able to re-instate an expired life insurance policy if she just makes a payment to cover the last few years of unpaid fees. ID thieves may even try to use the deceased person's Social Security number to create a new identity.

So how do you protect your family after the loved one has passed?

Limit the information you put in your loved one's obituary or post online, including on social media. For instance, know that scammers are looking for dates of birth, mothers' maiden names, addresses and other personally identifiable information or PII.

Alert the major credit reporting agencies as soon as you can as to the passing. They will want copies of the death certificate as well as specific details about your relative, including date of birth, Social Security Number, full legal name and recent addresses. The agencies will flag the person's credit file and put a freeze on it to prevent others from opening new unauthorized lines of credit.

Make sure to also notify any current banks, credit unions or financial institutions that the deceased person used so that all checking, savings, investment or credit card accounts can be flagged appropriately. The same thing for insurance companies holding auto, home or life insurance policies. Check with the financial institution to see what access survivors' are entitled to and what protections will put in place to keep scammers out.

Send a copy of the death certificate to the IRS so that the person's tax account can be flagged as well. Send the death certificate to the mailing address that the deceased individual would normally use to submit tax returns. You may also submit a copy of the death certificate when you file the person's final tax return.

Sometimes your funeral home will notify the Social Security Administration -- but if not, you should do so right away.

Finally - obtain a credit report for the deceased person right after death and a few months down the road. This will help you to identify any otherwise unknown accounts and to watch for any attempted fraudulent activity after the death.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, be sure to report it to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.