FBI - Oregon
Emergency Messages as of 11:18 pm, Sun. Jun. 13
No information currently posted.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from FBI - Oregon.
Primary email address for a new account:

  
And/or follow our FlashAlerts via Twitter

About FlashAlert on Twitter:

FlashAlert utilizes the free service Twitter to distribute emergency text messages. While you are welcome to register your cell phone text message address directly into the FlashAlert system, we recommend that you simply "follow" the FlashAlert account for FBI - Oregon by clicking on the link below and logging in to (or creating) your free Twitter account. Twitter sends messages out exceptionally fast thanks to arrangements they have made with the cell phone companies.

Click here to add FBI - Oregon to your Twitter account or create one.

@FBIPortland

Hide this Message


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021
TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Scams Targeting Doctors (Photo) - 06/08/21

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against drug scams targeting doctors. 

The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center is seeinge more and more reports of a scam that is targeting both active and retired doctors. The victim receives a call or message from someone claiming to be a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agent. 

The alleged DEA agent claims that someone is using the doctor’s DEA number to illegally prescribe tens of thousands of units of opioids. The scammer tells the doctor that he or she needs to change her Social Security number and/or is subject to arrest for the illegal activity. 

If you get one of these government impersonation scam calls, here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Never respond to unsolicited or unknown calls or messages. 

  • If someone asks you for your Social Security number or other personal financial or health information, hang up. 

  • If you receive an email or text message asking you to click on a link – don’t do it. The fraudster is likely trying to get you to download malware onto your device. 

If you are the victim of an online fraud, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at? www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.?? 

###

TT - Unwanted Apps - GrAPHIC - June 1, 2021
TT - Unwanted Apps - GrAPHIC - June 1, 2021
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Unwanted Apps (Photo) - 06/01/21

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against unwanted apps! 

Did you forget your password again? You know you are supposed to create complex and unique passwords for everything, which makes it really difficult to remember what they all are. Luckily, more and more sites are offering you the chance to log in with your Facebook or Google or other digital account. Seems easy, right? 

It is definitely easier to collect and become registered on more and more websites and apps if you go this route – but our friends at the FTC have a warning for you. This kind of open access can leave you vulnerable to cyberattacks, phishing, and scams. 

When you use social media accounts to sign up for apps or websites, you may give the app or website permission to do things on your behalf, like post to your social media page. You’re also possibly saying it’s OK to access information like your name, birthdate, location, contacts, and even your messages. Over time, you may even forget which apps or sites have these permissions. 

Here’s how to keep yourself safe:  

  • Start by asking yourself – does this site or app really need my info? Pay attention to what kind of details and access it is asking for. If you are uncomfortable allowing access, click “deny” or “disagree” when it asks for permissions. This typically stops the registration process. 

  • Purge your permissions list. Go to the settings on your social media site and follow the instructions that lead you to the list of sites and apps to which you are granting access. Follow the instructions that tell you how to remove those apps or sites. 

  • Delete all apps from your devices that you are not using. 

  • Keep up the good work! Check your accounts every few months to see what kinds of permissions your programs or apps have. 

If you are the victim of an online fraud, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at ?www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.?? 

###

TT - Adult Content Extortion - GRAPHIC - May 25, 2021
TT - Adult Content Extortion - GRAPHIC - May 25, 2021
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Adult Content Extortion (Photo) - 05/25/21

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against adult content extortion schemes. 

Extortion schemes are as old as time, but in recent years we’ve seen a number of scams in which the fraudster says he has photos or videos of the victim in compromising positions. Usually the victim receives an email with his or her name listed and maybe some personal details... just enough to make it seem as though the bad guy really has something on you. He demands payment, often within 48 hours, or he threatens to release the images he allegedly has of you to your friends and family. 

Well lately, we’ve been seeing a number of extortion complaints from Oregonians coming in through the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, and these complaints have a few new twists. The fraudster attaches a document or photo showing what, he says, is his proof. That attachment is likely loaded with malware that will infect your device if you click on it. 

This new scammer also threatens that he will block your access to your device and social media accounts – much like a ransomware attack – if you choose to ignore his warning. And, while bad spelling and syntax are common, these particular messages come with a distinctly English take on things. In particular, the fraudster is using common British words or phrases to describe sex acts as opposed to what you might hear more commonly in the U.S. 

Here are some ways to protect yourself: 

  • Don’t?open emails or attachments from unknown?people, and don’t communicate with those who send unsolicited messages.? 

  • Don’t?store sensitive or embarrassing photos or information online or on your mobile devices.? 

  • Use strong passwords and don’t?use the same password for multiple websites.? 

  • Never provide personal information of any sort via email. Be aware that many?fraudulent?emails requesting your personal information appear to be legitimate.? 

  • Make sure you have activated the?security settings for social media accounts?and that they are?set at the highest level of protection.? 

  • Cover up your camera. Simple piece of colored tape or a sticky note will do the trick. 

Note: the FBI does not condone the payment of online extortion demands as the funds will facilitate continued criminal activity. 

If you are the victim of an online fraud, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at? www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.?? 

###

TT- C-19 Funeral Fraud - GRAPHIC - May 18, 2021
TT- C-19 Funeral Fraud - GRAPHIC - May 18, 2021
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against COVID-19 Funeral Fraud (Photo) - 05/18/21

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against COVID funeral scams.  

Recently, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) started providing up to $9,000 in reimbursement funds to applicants for each COVID-19 related funeral for which they were responsible. Let’s say you had a parent die, and the death certificate confirms COVID was the cause. You paid for the funeral and have receipts to prove it. You can apply to FEMA for reimbursement.  

If you were responsible for multiple funerals, you can apply for a total of up to $35,500. There are some restrictions in terms of eligibility for the funds, and anyone who is interested in applying should check FEMA.gov for all eligibility requirements (https://www.fema.gov/disasters/coronavirus/economic/funeral-assistance/faq

As with any disaster or relief program, scam artists will attempt to take advantage of those most in need. According to FEMA, one particular fraud that is already taking root involves bad actors who offer to help you apply for aid. Note: there is only one way to apply for FEMA’s funeral aid, and that is by calling FEMA directly at 844-684-6333. There is no online application process and no legitimate way that others can apply on your behalf. 

Here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Don’t respond to any third-party offer, email, text message, or social media post offering to help you get aid.  

  • Don’t respond to any solicitation that looks like it is from FEMA directly. FEMA will not contact you unless you make the initial call. 

  • Never give out personal information – including name, date of birth, Social Security number or other sensitive information – for yourself or for your deceased relative unless you made the call to FEMA and you know you are speaking to a FEMA representative.  

If you believe are a victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at ?www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.?

###