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Tech Tuesday Graphic
Tech Tuesday Graphic
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Hoax Threats (Photo) - 10/09/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against hoax threats.

Both schools and police agencies throughout Oregon and across the country are trying to manage the increasing number of threats that get shared, called in or posted online each day. Once school officials and officers learn of these threats, it can take quite a bit of money and time to identify the sender, investigate the situation and mitigate any concerns. Communities can’t ignore the threats, meaning that in the end your kids end up losing time in the classroom, and already thin budgets face extra stress from the expense.

The posted warnings often include vows of potential mass shootings, bombings, or other violent attacks. Sometimes the threats are real – but many times, students or bystanders are instigating a particular incident for other reasons. Perhaps they feel they have suffered an injustice. Or they want attention. Or they just get a thrill out of the fear that such threats create.

The FBI has launched a public awareness campaign called #ThinkBeforeYouPost to help address this growing problem. The goal is to educate those who are considering posting hoax threats as to the severe consequences they could face. When an investigation concludes that there was a false or hoax threat made to a school or other public place, the person posting the threat could face up to five years in federal prison. State charges are also possible.

Hoax posters may think that they can make their threats anonymously via social media, gaming sites or online forums. They should know that the FBI and its law enforcement partners follow up on every tip received from the public, and we analyze and investigate all threats to determine both their origin and their credibility. Federal, state and local law enforcement work together, using a full range of tools to mitigate those threats. Early intervention can prevent a situation from escalating – allowing law enforcement to identify, assess and manage the threat.

In many cases, it is difficult to know immediately whether a threat is real or a hoax. We ask that the public continue to contact law enforcement to report any potential threats or suspicious activity. If there is an immediate risk to you or others, call 911. In Oregon, many schools also participate in the Safe Oregon program which allows students to report suspected threats privately through email, a mobile app, phone calls, texts and online web portals. Other options include contacting your local police department, submitting a written tip to the FBI at tips.FBI.gov or calling your local FBI office. In Oregon, the FBI can be reached 24 hours a day at (503) 224-4181.

Remember – hoax threats are not a joke, so #ThinkBeforeYouPost.

###

TT - Cyber predators for parents - October 2, 2018 - graphic
TT - Cyber predators for parents - October 2, 2018 - graphic
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense against Cyber Predators (Photo) - 10/02/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against cyber predators and privacy violators targeting your kids.

Last week, we talked about the FBI’s Safe Online Surfing program designed for kids in grades three through eight. The program teaches them good online etiquette, how to stay safe on social media and more.

This week, we turn to the parents. We – as parents – know we are supposed to watch over our children’s virtual lives, but the vigilance required and the rapidly changing nature of technology can make that seem like an impossible task.

Your best bet is to work WITH your child. Talk about the potential dangers kids face these days, the hard decisions they may have to make when faced with difficult choices online and your family’s expectations as to appropriate behavior.

To that end, we are going to offer you some easy starter tasks to get you going:

  • Together, check your child’s phone and computer to identify which apps they have loaded and what programs they are using. Work with the child to set the privacy settings on each of these platforms, games, and chat programs to the highest, most restrictive level. Because these privacy settings seem to change frequently, it is a good idea to do an online search to receive specific instructions on how best to manage these settings for any particular app. Your goal is to restrict who can see your child’s profile and how much private info that person can see. You also want to limit an outsider’s ability to be notified when your child is online.
  • Talk about what a safe profile includes. Instead of uploading a profile photo of your child, suggest he uses a picture of his favorite pet or game character. Never post a full name – partial names or initials are a better bet. Don’t give out dates of birth, school info or details about sports teams, hobbies and the like.
  • For new users, create a safe screen name. Avoid using your real name, if you can … as well as anything that identifies your age, gender and geographic location. Obviously off limits: anything that is sexually provocative (or could be seen that way by others).
  • Make sure you know who your child’s virtual friends are, and how often they are communicating. Are they talking by text? Video chat? Through gaming sites? Teach them to deny friend requests from people who are not face-to-face friends as well.
  • Teach your kids that what they post online is forever. It can be very easy to share hurtful comments and personal pictures with your BFF or new boyfriend… but actions taken out of temporary teenage angst can have lifelong impacts. Colleges and employers are diligently digging up old posts to find out what kind of person you are. In many cases they can find posts you thought you deleted. Do you really want them to see that hateful thing you said or did in middle school? And, that embarrassing photo you thought you were only sending to one person? The whole school saw it in a matter of minutes.
  • Finally, teach your kids to trust their instincts. If they have a sense that something is not quite right, they feel threatened or they see something that is inappropriate – they need to know that they can come talk to you. Work with your school, local police or the social media provider to report concerns. Most will have procedures in place for you to report abusive or inappropriate behavior.

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

TT - SOS - September 25, 2018 - graphic
TT - SOS - September 25, 2018 - graphic
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense with the FBI's Safe Online Surfing (SOS) Program (Photo) - 09/25/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense to keep our kids safe while they surf online.

Your kids are starting to settle back into the school routine, and, as they do, many of them are carrying phones with them to class. They are also spending more and more time online for legitimate reasons – whether it is for typing exercises, research for a speech or practicing math. While technology is an awesome tool for educators, there are steps that you can take to set your child up to be both successful and safe online.

To that end, the FBI has developed a computer literacy program called “Safe Online Surfing” or “SOS”. Teachers and administrators can utilize this program in the school setting – or parents can use it one-on-one with their children at home. The Safe Online Surfing program includes age-specific materials for grades three through eight, and it is now also available in Spanish. This program is completely free for you to use.

SOS is a series of grade-appropriate online games that allow your child to have fun while learning some important lessons. The student will explore what good online etiquette looks like, how to manage cyber bullies, and how good passwords and double authentication help keep them safe. They will learn about what they should do before downloading that new app or game onto their phone – and how to screen friend requests in a responsible way. And, they will also be able to investigate the dangers of plagiarism and privacy violations.

Here are some helpful tips for parents, as well:

  • Talk to your kids about what kinds of information, photos and videos are appropriate to share – and what’s not. Remind them that even sending one picture to a friend can lead to an entire school seeing what might be a child’s most embarrassing moment.
  • Teach your kids how to limit the information they put online. They shouldn’t be posting their full name, date of birth and school information on social media platforms or give it to third party vendors.
  • Train your kids that free software, apps and downloads may sound great – but in some cases they can be illegal. In other cases, you are opening up your phone and computer to potential malware attacks.

If you are a parent or educator interested in learning more about the Safe Online Surfing program – go to sos.fbi.gov.

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

Lt.Abrahamson3
Lt.Abrahamson3
Portland Police Bureau Lieutenant Graduates from the FBI National Academy (Photo) - 09/25/18

Lieutenant David Abrahamson, Portland Police Bureau, recently completed one of the toughest challenges available to local law enforcement officers: the FBI National Academy. In mid-September, Lt. Abrahamson and two other Oregon law enforcement officers completed a ten-week training session at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

There is a highly competitive process local law enforcement officers must go through to be selected for this honor. That process includes a nomination by a supervisor; interviews with the candidate and co-workers to determine leadership skills and abilities; a background check; a determination of physical fitness; and the support of former National Academy graduates within the candidate's organization.

"Only a few law enforcement officers from Oregon have the opportunity to attend the National Academy each year," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "The Academy gives them the chance to share best practices and explore many facets of law enforcement leadership with others from across the country and the world."

Lt. Abrahamson started his law enforcement career with the Portland Police Bureau more than 18 years ago and considers it a privilege to serve the community that he has lived in since his youth. In 2000, he began his career as an officer with Patrol Operations in the Northeast Precinct. Four years later he transferred to the Drugs and Vice Division and was part of the Regional Organized Crime Narcotics Task Force. He was promoted to Sergeant in 2011 and moved to the East Precinct where he worked in Patrol Operations, on Rapid Response Team and on the Major Crash Team. He was promoted to Lieutenant in 2017 and now serves in the Detective Division.

“Lt. Abrahamson has been a committed member of the Portland Police Bureau throughout his career, and I’m certain he applied the same dedication to his time at the FBI National Academy,” said Portland Police Chief Danielle Outlaw. “We are looking forward to him returning to the Police Bureau in our investigations branch and apply the leadership knowledge and experience he has gained.”

During the ten weeks of training, local executive-level law enforcement officers spend most of their time in the classroom. Lt. Abrahamson’s National Academy classes included: Essentials for Law Enforcement Leaders; Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement; Emotional Intelligence; Leading At-Risk Employees; Approaches to Counterterrorism; and Fitness in Law Enforcement. The program allows participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of those studies. In addition to the classroom work, participants have physical training courses and activities.

Each year, the FBI sponsors four sessions of the National Academy. Each session includes about 220 local law enforcement officers from around the United States and around the world. While in the academy, the officers and deputies live in a dorm-like setting. The FBI does not charge U.S. students for tuition, books, equipment, meals, lodging or travel to and from their home.

 

Attached Media Files: Lt.Abrahamson3 , Lt.Abrahamson2 , Lt.Abrahamson1
FBI Arrests Cave Junction Man on Charges He Threatened YouTube Employees and CEO - 09/21/18

William Gregory Douglas, age 35, of Cave Junction, Oregon, is tentatively set to make his initial appearance before a federal magistrate judge on Monday, September 24, 2018, on charges that he threatened employees of YouTube. FBI Agents arrested Douglas outside a convenience store in Cave Junction on Thursday, September 20, 2018, without incident. 

According to the criminal complaint filed in this case, Douglas started making threats online on August 23, 2018, using the alias "LiamXmaiLRevolutionX". The criminal complaint alleges that Douglas posted a series of tweets that included language such as "I would kill the 100 YouTube employees," "you want a bigger mass casualty aka shooting let's see what I can do," and "return my channel you low life Sholes before someone else comes and shoots more of your employees." On September 17, 2018, LiamXmaiLRevolutionX posted a message to @SusanWojcicki: “Susan I'm coming for you today #pray." Susan Wojcicki is the CEO of YouTube.

The complaint also details three videos in which the subject identifies himself as William Douglas. In those videos, he “provided long rants about the ‘Deep State’ and stated he has been ‘shadow-banned’ from YouTube, which he described as a government operation.” In one video, “he stated he has to go to Mountain View to ‘visit’ people at YouTube.” Approximately 700 people work at the YouTube premises in Mountain View, California.

Douglas faces charges of Cyberstalking and Transmission of Threats in Interstate Commerce to Injure Another.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and all defendants should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.

###

YBR Course
YBR Course
Klamath Falls Police Department Captain Graduates From the FBI National Academy (Photo) - 09/20/18

Klamath Falls Police Captain Ryan Brosterhous recently completed one of the toughest challenges available to local law enforcement officers: the FBI National Academy. In mid-September, Captain Brosterhous and two other Oregon law enforcement officers completed a ten-week training session at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

There is a highly competitive process local law enforcement officers must go through to be selected for this honor. That process includes a nomination by a supervisor; interviews with the candidate and co-workers to determine leadership skills and abilities; a background check; a determination of physical fitness; and the support of former National Academy graduates within the candidate's organization.

"Only a few law enforcement officers from Oregon have the opportunity to attend the National Academy each year," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "The Academy gives them the chance to share best practices and explore many facets of law enforcement leadership with others from across the country and the world."

Captain Brosterhous started his law enforcement career as a patrol officer with the Klamath Falls Police Department in 1996. Since being hired, Captain Brosterhous has served as a patrol officer, narcotics detective, Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team member, patrol sergeant, and an administrative lieutenant. As a Captain he oversees the Patrol and Operations Division.

Captain Brosterhous earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from Southern Oregon State College, holds an Executive Certificate from the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training and is a graduate of the 69th Command Institute for Law Enforcement Executives.  In 2016, Captain Brosterhous completed the Chief Executive Leadership course at the Southern Police Institute.

"The FBI National Academy provides selected law enforcement executives with an amazing opportunity to expand their knowledge of law enforcement leadership and advance their careers,” said Chief David Henslee, City of Klamath Falls Police Department. “The National Academy also provides participants with opportunities to create and share ideas and programs to enhance community partnerships and strengthen communities. We are extremely proud of Captain Brosterhous and are fortunate his leadership helps provide direction for the Klamath Falls Police Department."

During the ten weeks of training, local executive-level law enforcement officers spend most of their time in the classroom. Captain Brosterhous’ National Academy classes included: Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement; Fitness in Law Enforcement; Behavioral Science for Law Enforcement Leadership; Critical Incident Leadership; Psychology of Leadership; and Managing the Law Enforcement Image. The program allows participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of those studies. In addition to the classroom work, participants have physical training courses and activities.

Each year, the FBI sponsors four sessions of the National Academy. Each session includes about 220 local law enforcement officers from around the United States and around the world. While in the academy, the officers and deputies live in a dorm-like setting. The FBI does not charge U.S. students for tuition, books, equipment, meals, lodging or travel to and from their home.

Attached Media Files: YBR Course , Capt Brosterhous , NA Photo
WF - Cottage Grove - 9/17/18 - d
WF - Cottage Grove - 9/17/18 - d
FBI and Cottage Grove Police Department Searching for Attempted Bank Robbery Suspect (Photo) - 09/18/18

The FBI and Cottage Grove Police Department are asking for the public's help identifying a man who attempted to rob a Wells Fargo Bank branch on Monday, September 17th. This branch is located inside the Safeway store at 1500 E. Main Street, Cottage Grove. At approximately 4:40 pm, the man approached the teller desk and demanded cash. Once the bank employees triggered the alarm, the man got spooked and left before police arrived.

Witnesses described him as:

Race: White

Age: Mid to late 30's

Height: 6'0"

Weight: 175 pounds

Eyes: Blue

Hair: Blond

Facial hair: May have light beard/mustache

Clothing: Baseball-style hat with the word "Alaska" on it, white short sleeved shirt over a long-sleeved black shirt, and khaki shorts over black sweat pants

 

The wanted flyer for this suspect can be seen on the FBI's Bank Robbery website at https://bankrobbers.fbi.gov/robbers-container/2018-09-18.5004412284

Anyone with information about the man's identity is asked to call the FBI at (541) 343-5222 or the Cottage Grove Police Department at (541) 942-9145. Tips may also be submitted at tips.fbi.gov

###

TT - Disaster Charity Fraud - Graphic
TT - Disaster Charity Fraud - Graphic
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Disaster Charity Fraud (Photo) - 09/18/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against charity fraud.

With Hurricane Florence hitting the east coast last week… and the on-going disaster recovery efforts stretching from Hawaii to Puerto Rico… you need to be able to tell the legitimate charities from the frauds.

It is no secret that charity scams spike after significant events, particularly natural disasters. The news and your social media feeds are filled with photos of chaos and destruction. You feel helpless, and the fraudster knows it. These criminals will create fake social media accounts and websites to make it easy for you to give. Just click the link, and you will feel like you’ve made a difference. Unfortunately, if you pick the wrong organization, those most in need will never see your donation.

Along with the Federal Trade Commission, FEMA and other partner agencies, we offer these tips for safe giving:

  • Donate to charities you know and trust.
  • Designate the donation to go to a specific disaster relief effort as opposed to a general fund.
  • Never click on links or open attachments in unsolicited e-mail or social media posts.
  • Verify the legitimacy of any e-mail or social media solicitation by contacting the organization directly through a trusted contact number.
  • Beware of organizations with copycat names similar to, but not exactly the same as, those of reputable charities.
  • Avoid cash donations if possible. Pay by credit card or write a check directly to the charity. Do not make checks payable to individuals.
  • Legitimate charities do not normally solicit donations via money transfer services. They also won’t ask for donations via gift cards.
  • Most legitimate charity websites end in .org rather than .com.
  • Make contributions directly, rather than relying on others to make a contribution on your behalf.

Those affected by recent disasters can use your help – and there are plenty of legitimate charities out there to do that work. You just need to do your research before giving.

If you have been victimized by a charity fraud scam or any other online scam, be sure to file a report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.

FBI Academy
FBI Academy
Oregon State Police Lieutenant Graduates From the FBI National Academy (Photo) - 09/17/18

Oregon State Police Lieutenant Jeff Fitzgerald recently completed one of the toughest challenges available to local law enforcement officers: the FBI National Academy. In mid-September, Lt. Fitzgerald and two other Oregon law enforcement officers completed a ten-week training session at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

There is a highly competitive process local law enforcement officers must go through to be selected for this honor. That process includes a nomination by a supervisor; interviews with the candidate and co-workers to determine leadership skills and abilities; a background check; a determination of physical fitness; and the support of former National Academy graduates within the candidate's organization.

"Only a few law enforcement officers from Oregon have the opportunity to attend the National Academy each year," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "The Academy gives them the chance to share best practices and explore many facets of law enforcement leadership with others from across the country and the world."

Lt. Fitzgerald started his law enforcement career more than 19 years ago with the Oregon State Police. He was assigned as a trooper out of Grants Pass in 1999 and promoted to patrol sergeant in Central Point in 2005. Later in 2005, he transferred Grants Pass and held that position for six years. In 2011, he transferred to the Major Crimes Section in Central Point for four years before OSP promoted him to the Patrol Lieutenant position in Grants Pass. In 2018, he transferred to his current position of SW Region Criminal Lieutenant where his responsibilities include the supervision of major crimes, drug enforcement and arson detectives in Southwest Oregon. His area encompasses the Springfield, Coos Bay, Gold Beach, Roseburg, Grants Pass, Central Point, Klamath Falls and Lakeview offices. 

"The Oregon State Police is honored to have our agency represented at the FBI National Academy by Lieutenant Jeff Fitzgerald. Jeff is an exceptional leader and typifies the agency values of Honor, Loyalty, Dedication, Compassion and Integrity,” said Travis Hampton, Oregon State Police Superintendent. “We'll be glad to have him home to begin application of his new skills and professional relationships. The OSP treasures our relationship with the FBI and pleased to supply quality applicants to the program.”

During the ten weeks of training, local executive-level law enforcement officers spend most of their time in the classroom. Lt. Fitzgerald’s National Academy classes included: Leadership in Investigations For Violent Crimes; Behavioral Science For Law Enforcement Leaders; Essentials For Law Enforcement Leaders; Contemporary Issues in Police and Media Relations; Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement and Fitness in Law Enforcement. The program allows participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of those studies. In addition to the classroom work, participants have physical training courses and activities.

Each year, the FBI sponsors four sessions of the National Academy. Each session includes about 220 local law enforcement officers from around the United States and around the world. While in the academy, the officers and deputies live in a dorm-like setting. The FBI does not charge U.S. students for tuition, books, equipment, meals, lodging or travel to and from their home.

Attached Media Files: FBI Academy , Lt.FitzgeraldOSP , Lt.Fitzgerald