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20-Dollar_Art_Show.jpeg
"The 20-Dollar Art Show" Comes to the High Desert Museum (Photo) - 10/13/21

BEND, OR — In the fall of 2013, Bright Place Gallery in Bend debuted The 20-Dollar Art Show as a vehicle for artists to share their art with the public in a low-pressure setting where they could build confidence selling art. The Gallery did not take a commission. The artist kept 100 percent of sales and the art show was a success for all. 

Fast-forward to 2019. The annual show displayed more than 2,100 pieces of art from 120 local and regional artists, amateur and professional. On opening night, 900 pieces sold in three hours for $20 each. Like many beloved events, the COVID-19 pandemic put the brakes on the thriving local art show. Now, The 20-Dollar Art Show is returning and moving to the spacious gallery walls of the High Desert Museum. 

“We are thrilled to move this event to the Museum,” said Bright Place Gallery owner Stuart Breidenstein. “The 20-Dollar Art Show had grown beyond the walls of the Bright Place Gallery, and the Museum allows us the opportunity to make it bigger and better.”

At this year’s opening event on Saturday, October 30 beginning at 5:00 pm, participants will enter the High Desert Museum through the large meadow. The snaking line will allow for physical distancing, and face coverings will be required both inside and outside of the Museum. A limited number of participants will be allowed inside the Museum at a time to provide for adequate spacing indoors.

Participants will be required to show upon arrival proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours and a photo ID. Those under 12 years of age are welcome without a vaccination card or negative test.

Art lovers may begin lining up at the Museum’s meadow entrance at 4:00 pm. While guests wait, local poet and artist MOsley WOtta will MC the event, with special guest Killy Holiday. The event takes place the day before Halloween and participants are encouraged to wear costumes. Participants should come prepared for the elements, rain or shine.

Local artist Monica Helms has shown her colorful, impressionistic work since the show’s inception. She witnessed the show go from a handful of artists and patrons to hundreds of fellow art lovers and buyers waiting in long lines for their chance to view and purchase artwork.

The 20-Dollar Art Show is pure inspiration and joy, the perfect catalyst for creativity and growth,” said Helms. “I'm so excited that the show is going to be at the High Desert Museum this year. It’s a perfect venue for an incredible community-inclusive art event. I couldn't think of a more perfect combo.”

Other popular local artists creating work for The 20-Dollar Art Show include Abby Dubief, Amanda Toms, Evan Namkung and more than 100 other local and regional artists.

 

Art will become available to take home starting Monday, November 1. Buyers may pick up their purchases during Museum hours, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm daily, through the show’s closing on Wednesday, November 10. Artwork is for sale throughout the duration of the show and each $20 piece directly supports the artist.

 

Tickets for The 20-Dollar Art Show Opening Night Party are available for $5 from the High Desert Museum at highdesertmuseum.org/20-art-show-opening-night-party. The 20-Dollar Art Show (highdesertmuseum.org/20-dollar-art-show) closes Wednesday, November 10.

 

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and is a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

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Impermanence-of-Forests.jpg
Wildfires Explored through Art in Exhibit (Photo) - 09/21/21

BEND, OR — Across the American West, drought, dense forests and extreme weather exacerbated by climate change are contributing to catastrophic fires. The wildfire season is getting longer, and fires are becoming more intense and frequent.

Artist Bryan David Griffith found inspiration in fires to pose valuable questions. His artistic works will come to the High Desert Museum starting Saturday, October 16 in the exhibition Rethinking Fire.

Dualities in nature–life and death, forest and fire–are at the heart of Griffith’s artwork. The exhibition includes encaustic beeswax paintings, fire studies on paper and large-scale burned wood sculptures.

Griffith investigates opposing forces in nature by using fire itself as a medium alongside other materials including wood and beeswax. His work reveals the human desire to control natural processes, often with unintended consequences. Rethinking Fire fosters a space where viewers can experience their own discoveries and pose their own questions. 

Griffith’s journey into artwork began while studying engineering at the University of Michigan. After stumbling on a copy of Henry Horenstein’s Black and White Photography: A Basic Manual, he built a makeshift darkroom. He began a career with an international management consulting firm after graduation. However, Griffith was troubled by the environmental impact of his clients. He ultimately resigned to pursue photography full-time, adopting a nomadic life and saving every dime for film and gas. The experience led to a personal connection with America’s public lands, reflected in his first collection of images, Listen to the Wild

In 2014, Griffith’s home and studio were threatened by the Slide Fire in Sedona, Arizona. Coming out of the experience, he received a grant to study fire in the field with scientists as part of a group project called Fires of Change, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Joint Fire Science Consortium. The work from the project earned the 2016 Viola Award from the Flagstaff Arts Council and sparked the solo exhibition Rethinking Fire at the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum in Arizona. Griffith currently lives in the mountain town of Flagstaff, Arizona with his wife, Tasha.

“We are experiencing landscape-altering wildfires more frequently in the High Desert,” said Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “Rethinking Fire offers a different vantage point through art, demonstrating that a force like wildfire that can be intensely destructive can also create awareness, resilience and a call to action.”

Griffith’s work is in public collections at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; University of Michigan Museum of Art; Center for Creative Photography and Fort Wayne Museum of Art. He has exhibited extensively throughout the United States.

Rethinking Fire (highdesertmuseum.org/rethinking-fire) will be on display through January 9, 2022.

The exhibit is possible with support from Alex Hodge Construction, Cascade A&E, Land Rover Portland, Tonkon Torp, Vernam Crane Services and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and is a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.