Oregon Folklife Network
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News Releases
Folklife Program at Chehalem Cultural Center - 07/20/18

Newberg, OR —Join folklorist Amy Howard and traditional basket maker Connie Graves for a conversation about some of the cultural traditions of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the people who practice them. The talk will be Thursday, July 26th at 6:30 PM at Chehalem Cultural Center, 415 E Sheridan St, Newberg, OR 97132. Refreshments will be provided by the Yamhill County Cultural Coalition.

This open community conversation invites audiences to connect with tradition keeper Connie Graves about basket weaving and other unique cultural traditions. Graves will also display her baskets and demonstrate weaving techniques. Howard spent several days speaking to members of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, documenting their traditions, and learning how their customs shape their lives. Please come and chat with Graves and learn how she and others in the community are actively passing their skills and knowledge through the generations.

Funding for this program comes from the National Endowment for the Arts to the Oregon Folklife Network, Oregon’s designated Folk & Traditional Arts Program. The project sent trained folklorists to conduct research in the Willamette Valley area of Benton, Linn, Lane, Marion Counties and the Grande Ronde Community to meet and document culture bearers in the region. Free public programs are held in each area.

Amy Howard received a BA in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an MA in American Studies and Folklore from Utah State University. Her love of folklore fieldwork began in 2007 on an undergraduate field study in Guatemala. Since then, she has interned at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, coordinated public programs, and worked on multiple documentation projects in Utah and Idaho. In 2013, she collaborated with other fieldworkers documenting and producing a book on quilting traditions in the Bear River Heritage Area. In 2015, she and two of her students documented artistic, occupational, and recreational traditions in the Southeast Idaho Snake River Plain for the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Together, they created an exhibit and organized public performances at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. She is currently documenting Oregon traditions and culture keepers in the Willamette Valley.

For more information about public programs in throughout the Willamette Valley, contact Jennie Flinspach at ofn@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820.

Please contact Oregon Folklife Network Director, Riki Saltzman, at riki@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820 with questions about the Oregon Folklife Network or recommendations for traditions, groups, or individual folk & traditional artists to be documented in the Willamette Valley area. OFN always appreciates contact information for traditional musicians and dancers, quilters, storytellers, cooks, leatherworkers, fly-tiers, wood carvers, silversmiths, taxidermists, basket makers, and more.

The OFN is administered by the University of Oregon and is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

SOURCE: Jennie Flinspach, ofn@uoregon.edu, 541-246-3820

Note: The University of Oregon is equipped with an on-campus television studio with a point-of-origin Vyvx connection, which provides broadcast-quality video to networks worldwide via fiber optic network. In addition, there is video access to satellite uplink, and audio access to an ISDN codec for broadcast-quality radio interviews.

Attached Media Files: Grand_Ronde_flyer.pdf
Folklife Program At Casa De La Cultural Tlanese - 07/20/18

Salem, OR —Join folklorist Amy Howard, Samoan dancer Tasi Keener, and Tlanese artist Paola Sumoza for a conversation about some of the cultural traditions of Marion County and the people who practice them. The talk will be on Friday, July 27th at 6:30 PM at Casa de la Cultural Tlanese, 1154 Madison St NE, Salem, OR 97301.

This open community conversation invites audiences to connect with Marion County tradition keepers Tasi Keener and Paola Sumoza. Keener, the Director of Paradise of Samoa, a traditional Polynesian dance troupe, will demonstrate traditional Samoan costume and dance. Sumoza, CCO and co-founder of Casa de la Cultural Tlanese, a nonprofit organization committed to sharing Mexican culture through folk dance, community workshops, and traditional events, will discuss the organization and demonstrate traditional Tlanese arts. Howard spent several days in Salem and the surrounding area speaking to members of the community, documenting their traditions, and learning how their occupations shaped their lives. Please come and chat with Keener and Sumoza and learn how they are actively passing their skills and knowledge through the generations.

Funding for this program comes from the National Endowment for the Arts to the Oregon Folklife Network, Oregon’s designated Folk & Traditional Arts Program. The project sent trained folklorists to conduct research in the Willamette Valley area of Benton, Linn, Lane, and Marion Counties and the Grand Ronde Community to meet and document culture bearers in the region. Free public programs are held in each area.

Amy Howard received a BA in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an MA in American Studies and Folklore from Utah State University. Her love of folklore fieldwork began in 2007 on an undergraduate field study in Guatemala. Since then, she has interned at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, coordinated public programs, and worked on multiple documentation projects in Utah and Idaho. In 2013, she collaborated with other fieldworkers documenting and producing a book on quilting traditions in the Bear River Heritage Area. In 2015, she and two of her students documented artistic, occupational, and recreational traditions in the Southeast Idaho Snake River Plain for the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Together, they created an exhibit and organized public performances at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. She is currently documenting Oregon traditions and culture keepers in the Willamette Valley.

For more information about public programs in throughout the Willamette Valley, contact Jennie Flinspach at ofn@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820.

Please contact Oregon Folklife Network Director, Riki Saltzman, at riki@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820 with questions about the Oregon Folklife Network or recommendations for traditions, groups, or individual folk & traditional artists to be documented in the Willamette Valley area. OFN always appreciates contact information for traditional musicians and dancers, quilters, storytellers, cooks, leatherworkers, fly-tiers, wood carvers, silversmiths, taxidermists, basket makers, and more.

The OFN is administered by the University of Oregon and is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

SOURCE: Jennie Flinspach, ofn@uoregon.edu, 541-246-3820

Note: The University of Oregon is equipped with an on-campus television studio with a point-of-origin Vyvx connection, which provides broadcast-quality video to networks worldwide via fiber optic network. In addition, there is video access to satellite uplink, and audio access to an ISDN codec for broadcast-quality radio interviews.

Attached Media Files: Marion_County_flyer.pdf
FOLKLIFE PROGRAM AT Guthrie Park Community Center - 07/18/18

Dallas, Ore.—Join folklorist Amy Howard and Guthrie Park Community Center director and musician, Sally Clark, and selected musicians for a conversation about traditional music and music jams in Polk County. The conversation will take place just before the regular Friday night jam on July 20, 2018, 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm. at the Guthrie Park Community Center, 4320 Kings Valley Hwy, Dallas, OR 97338.

This open, community conversation invites audiences to connect with Sally Clark and local musicians about traditional music and the Friday night jam at Guthrie Park. Howard spent several days in Dallas and the surrounding area speaking to members of the community, documenting their traditions, and learning how their cultural traditions shaped their lives. Please come and chat with Clark and others and learn how they are actively passing their skills and knowledge through the generations.

 

Funding for this program comes from the National Endowment for the Arts to the Oregon Folklife Network, Oregon’s designated Folk & Traditional Arts Program. The project sent trained folklorists to meet and document culture keepers in the Willamette Valley counties of Polk, Benton, Lane, Mario, and Linn as well as with artists from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Free public programs are held in each county.

 

Amy Howard received a BA in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an MA in American Studies and Folklore from Utah State University. Her love of folklore fieldwork began in 2007 on an undergraduate field study in Guatemala. She is currently documenting Oregon traditions and culture keepers in the Willamette Valley.

For more information about public programs in Benton, Lane, Marion, and Linn counties, contact Jennie Flinspach at jflinspa@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820.

The OFN is administered by the University of Oregon and is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Attached Media Files: Polk_Presentation_reduced.pdf
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IMG_0544.JPG
FOLKLIFE PROGRAM AT Guthrie Park Community Center (Photo) - 07/17/18

Dallas, Ore.—Join folklorist Amy Howard and Guthrie Park Community Center director and musician, Sally Clark, and selected musicians for a conversation about traditional music and music jams in Polk County. The conversation will take place just before the regular Friday night jam on July 20, 2018, 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm. at the Guthrie Park Community Center, 4320 Kings Valley Hwy, Dallas, OR 97338.

 

This open, community conversation invites audiences to connect with Sally Clark and local musicians about traditional music and the Friday night jam at Guthrie Park. Howard spent several days in Dallas and the surrounding area speaking to members of the community, documenting their traditions, and learning how their cultural traditions shaped their lives. Please come and chat with Clark and others and learn how they are actively passing their skills and knowledge through the generations.

 

Funding for this program comes from the National Endowment for the Arts to the Oregon Folklife Network, Oregon’s designated Folk & Traditional Arts Program. The project sent trained folklorists to meet and document culture keepers in the Willamette Valley counties of Polk, Benton, Lane, Mario, and Linn as well as with artists from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Free public programs are held in each county.

 

Amy Howard received a BA in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an MA in American Studies and Folklore from Utah State University. Her love of folklore fieldwork began in 2007 on an undergraduate field study in Guatemala. Since then, she has interned at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, coordinated public programs, and worked on multiple documentation projects in Utah and Idaho. In 2013, she collaborated with other fieldworkers documenting and producing a book on quilting traditions in the Bear River Heritage Area. In 2015, she and two of her students documented artistic, occupational, and recreational traditions in the Southeast Idaho Snake River Plain for the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Together they created an exhibit and organized public performances at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. She is currently documenting Oregon traditions and culture keepers in the Willamette Valley.

 

For more information about public programs in Benton, Lane, Marion, and Linn counties, contact Jennie Flinspach at jflinspa@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820.

 

Please contact Oregon Folklife Network Director, Riki Saltzman, at riki@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3820 with questions about the Oregon Folklife Network or recommendations for traditions, groups, or individual folk & traditional artists to be documented in the Willamette Valley. OFN always appreciates contact information for traditional musicians and dancers, quilters, storytellers, cooks, leatherworkers, fly-tiers, wood carvers, silversmiths, taxidermists, basket makers, and more.

 

The OFN is administered by the University of Oregon and is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Attached Media Files: IMG_0544.JPG