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Oregon State Parks annual parking permit $5 off in December - 11/30/20

SALEM, Oregon Give the gift of unlimited access to Oregon's state parks with an annual day-use parking permit. Holiday shoppers can buy annual parking permits for only $25 each--that's $5 off the regular price of $30, Dec. 1-31.

“This is the only time we discount the annual pass,” said Lisa Sumption, director of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). “Celebrate the holidays with family and friends by giving a gift that opens the doors to Oregon’s special places.”

Purchasing passes is easy–buy them online at store.oregonstateparks.org. Parking permits are also sold at some state park friends' group stores and selected local businesses throughout the state. For a complete list of vendors, visit stateparks.oregon.gov.

Parking costs $5 a day at 25 Oregon state parks unless you have a 12- or 24-month parking permit or a same-day camping receipt. The 24-month pass is $50 and are also available at store.oregonstateparks.org. The permits are transferable from vehicle to vehicle.

The Oregon State Park system is funded by camping and day-use fees, the Oregon Lottery, and a portion of state recreational vehicle registrations. Our revenues have fallen during the COVID-19 pandemic. If you would like to donate along with your permit purchase, look for the Donate button at the top of store.oregonstateparks.org.

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Rule Advisory Committee meets to discuss proposed beach driving rules in south Tillamook County - 11/30/20

PACIFIC CITY, Ore. — Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) has formed a Rule Advisory Committee to review proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rules governing driving and parking on the beach in south Tillamook County.

The committee will meet virtually Dec. 7, 2020, to review and discuss proposed changes to ocean shore rules south of Sand Lake. The meeting starts at 1 p.m. and is open to the public and can be viewed at youtube.com/channel/UCkqL6iVPBrfCTO27cNmCTwg.

After the committee review, the rule will open for public comment. Details will be posted at oregon.gov/oprd/PRP/Pages/PRP-tillamook-beach-driving.aspx.

The meeting agenda will include discussions about potential effects of closing a section of the ocean shore to driving between the mouth of Sand Lake and Tierra Del Mar and prohibiting parking on a section of the ocean shore at Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area. The committee will discuss the how the proposed rules may affect equitable beach access, as well as any financial effects.

OPRD appointed committee members from local community, recreation and business interests.

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meetings should contact Katie Gauthier at least three days in advance of the meeting at 503-510-9678 or katie.gauthier@oregon.gov.

Christmas Ships Parade designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition - 11/23/20

Portland, OR - The Christmas Ships Parade, a long-standing Oregon event, marks its upcoming 66th year with an Oregon Heritage Tradition designation by the Oregon Heritage Commission. 

Other Oregon Heritage Traditions include the Oregon State Fair, Medford’s Pear Blossom Festival, the Pendleton Round-Up, and the Woodburn Fiesta Mexicana. 

“The designation recognizes those traditions that have helped define the character of the state,” said Chelsea Rose, the commission’s chair. “The Christmas Ships Parade ties into the importance of the river to Oregon’s Heritage and Oregon’s identity. It is an event enjoyed by many as the ships travel the Willamette and Columbia Rivers and is a long standing tradition for those who view it each year.”

The Christmas Ships Parade began with one decorated sailboat in 1954 and has since grown to over 70 participating boats. The entirely volunteer operated event runs for 15 nights during December and travels the Willamette and Columbia Rivers in the Portland Metro area providing opportunities for communities to view it from the river front, restaurants, parks, neighborhoods and waysides along the rivers. Several cities along the rivers have tied their holiday events to the parade schedule.  

“The Christmas Ships Parade is a treasured tradition for many families and community members.  For 66 years Christmas Ships small and large have paraded with brightly lit, colorful, and thematically decorated displays to celebrate the holiday season.  A 100% volunteer run organization, Christmas Shippers spend countless hours on the chilly river waters to bring smiles to young and old alike.  Excited each year to launch the season, we look forward to carrying on the tradition.  Once you participate in the Christmas Ships Parade, whether as a Captain or a spectator, you will make it a tradition of your own,” says Kelly Marks, Christmas Ships Parade Board and Fleet Member.  “The Parade is about more than Christmas.  It represents family, community, celebration and hope.  It is a positive and uplifting experience unlike any other.”

Volunteers dedicate over 3,000 hours in trainings, meetings, outreach, logistics, and the actual time in the parade. They host up to three meet and greet events at different locations where community members can see the boats up close, meet the boat owners, and learn about boat safety. Parade volunteers also partner with various charities throughout the year such as Fallen Firefighters, Ronald McDonald House, William Temple House, Portland Fire & Rescue Toy and Joy Makers, and Columbia River Fire & Rescue Toy N Joy and Holiday Hope. 

This is an unusual year for Heritage Traditions. COVID-19 has forced many events to cancel or restructure for the first time in their 50+ year history. The only other time Oregon Heritage events have canceled has been due to WWI and WWII. This may be one of the few designated events that can safely proceed with their regular events with some minor safety modifications per state guidelines. While the parade will run as normal, all Meet & Greet events and open house activities are canceled for the 2020 parade season.  As always, it is possible that individual parade night cancellations may occur due to unsafe weather conditions.  This is unrelated to the pandemic.  Notification of any cancellations will be posted at www.chistmas ships.org and social media channels.

More information can be found on their website at: www.christmasships.org

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state. A list of Tradition designations is available at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/pages/heritage-designations.aspx.

The Oregon Heritage Commission coordinates efforts to solve statewide heritage issues through grants, education, and advocacy, and also promotes heritage tourism efforts.

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Silver Falls State Park Christmas Festival canceled for 2020 - 11/23/20

SILVERTON, Oregon – The annual Christmas Festival at Silver Falls State Park is canceled for the safety of visitors, volunteers and park staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The festival is a well-loved and well-attended tradition for many Oregonians,” said Guy Rodrigue, park manager for Silver Falls State Park. “Many of the crafts and other family events are held indoors and this year there was no practical way to maintain physical distancing and public gathering requirements.”

Rodrigue added that everyone is looking forward to hosting the festival in 2021.

The park and the Friends of Silver Falls Nature Store remain open, although some trails and roads in the southeast corner of the park are closed because of the wildfires earlier this fall. For the latest information, visit the Silver Falls State Park web page.

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Parking fee waived at Oregon State Parks Nov. 27, the day after Thanksgiving - 11/19/20

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians to head outside for some fresh air the day after Thanksgiving, Nov. 27, also known as ‘Green Friday.’ OPRD will waive day-use parking fees that day in 25 state parks across Oregon. 

“We recognize that being outdoors makes us feel better and is a break from the stresses of 2020,” said director Lisa Sumption. “In this unconventional year, we feel it is especially important to honor this tradition as thanks to Oregonians for supporting us through our toughest times.”

Thanksgiving weekend falls squarely within the Governor’s Two-Week Freeze, Nov. 18 – Dec. 2. Accordingly, OPRD directs people to limit gatherings at parks to six people and two households. This is in addition to longstanding direction to stay local, wear face coverings and maintain a 6’ distance from other visitors.

“Following these precautions is particularly important in the coming weeks to support statewide efforts to stop the spread of the virus,” Sumption said. “When visitors prepare and care, it keeps parks safe for everyone.”

Green Friday typically kicks off a series of holiday events in state parks, but this year OPRD opted to cancel these events. 

“The pandemic challenges all of us to find new, creative ways to celebrate the holidays,” Sumption said. “We look forward to the safe return of these holiday traditions, and until then, parks are open and here for you.”

The parking waiver applies from open to close Nov. 27 at the 25 parks that charge a $5 daily parking fee. A list of parks that require day-use parking permits is available at stateparks.oregon.gov. Parking is free year-round at the majority of Oregon’s 250-plus state park properties.  

Formal garden area of Shore Acres State Park closed through Dec. 2 - 11/18/20

COOS BAY, Oregon – The formal garden area within Shore Acres State Park is closed Nov. 18 through the end of day Dec. 2, 2020. The rest of the park remains open including the viewpoint and trails outside the garden area. The annual Shore Acres Holiday Lights event usually scheduled from Thanksgiving to New Year’s and held in the garden was canceled earlier this year because of the ongoing pandemic.

The garden closure is in response to the latest direction issued by Governor Kate Brown’s temporary freeze executive order. It is possible the closure will be extended past December 2, depending on future executive orders.

More information about Shore Acres State Park is available at https://stateparks.oregon.gov/index.cfm?do=park.profile&parkId=68. The $5 parking permit remains in effect.

If you visit this park or any other state park and wayside, please be respectful to everyone, wear a face covering, limit social gatherings (including outdoors) to no more than six people and two households, and maintain at least 6-feet physical distance from anyone not in your household.

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Historic Cottage Grove Armory
Historic Cottage Grove Armory
Community Disaster Resilience Planning for Heritage Resources model and guidebook available now (Photo) - 11/13/20

Oregon Heritage, in partnership with UO School of Planning, Public Policy and Management’s Institute for Policy Research & Engagement (IPRE), the City of Cottage Grove and several local nonprofits worked over the last year to develop a new model for heritage resource disaster planning. The initiative resulted in organizational plans for five heritage organizations, a community-wide plan for the city and a guidebook so the process can be duplicated in other communities.

 

Heritage resources like historic downtowns, museums, historic districts, cemeteries, genealogical libraries, etc. are valuable community assets. They are also wonderful resources to assist communities in recovery from disasters. The effort to strengthen these organizations’ resilience following a disaster is critical. According to Kuri Gill, grants and outreach coordinator with Oregon Heritage, it was time to try something new. “After working for years with heritage organizations on disaster planning and response, we discovered some challenges. Remaining focused on disaster planning and preparation when organizations are trying to keep the doors open and the lights on is tough.” It seemed that a community plan with coordinated goals would help drive the work and make it easier to access resources. The next step was to find the right team to pull off a pilot project.

 

Oregon Heritage coordinates the Oregon Heritage All-Star Community program, which recognizes communities that support, promote and coordinate their heritage resources. Cottage Grove is one such community, that also has an award-winning preservation plan which includes the community’s heritage resources. Since they were already coordinating heritage organizations and incorporating them into city planning, the city was an ideal pilot partner.

 

Oregon Heritage, then reached out to IPRE. They had worked together on past projects including a historic theaters study. IPRE has produced excellent community planning projects and disaster resilience work through its Community Planning Workshop (CPW). This project is a good example of the power of university-community partnerships, explains Robert Parker, director of strategic and technical solutions, for IPRE. “Oregon Heritage has long worked to support preservation of Oregon’s heritage, the CPW provided need capacity to bring the guidebook to completion,” said Parker. “The project supported the mission of Oregon Heritage, of heritage organizations in Cottage Grove, and provided our graduate students a robust learning platform on emergency management and resiliency in the middle of a global pandemic.”

 

 

Cottage Grove heritage nonprofits that committed to the project included: Bohemia Gold Mining Museum, Cottage Grove Genealogical Society, Cottage Grove Historical Society, Cottage Grove Museum, and Downtown Cottage Grove Inc. Representatives of each organization participated in several workshops and listening sessions to develop plans for their individual organizations. They also participated in the development of the community plan. According to Amanda Ferguson, City of Cottage Grove planner, the results were worth the effort. “I am so pleased that Cottage Grove was chosen to participate in this disaster planning process. Our Heritage Partners learned so much about disaster resilience, and are now much better prepared to respond to small and large issues within their organizations and as part of a greater heritage community. This plan will give the City a path forward to help guide community resilience efforts while positioning us to better preserve our own resources.”

 

“We are grateful to IPRE, the City of Cottage Grove, and our nonprofit partners for taking the leap with us,” notes Gill. “We know it will support Cottage Grove’s disaster resilience and now there is a guide for other communities to benefit the same way.” The project was also funded in part by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

 

A series of free, online workshops are being offered for those who want to learn more.

  • Fire Recovery and Community Disaster Resilience Planning for Historic Cemeteries – November 17, 1:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. Register to receive Zoom meeting information.
  • Disaster Preparedness and Resilience for Collecting Organizations – December 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Register to receive the Zoom meeting information.
  • Disaster Resilience for Main Streets – December 10, 9;00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Register to receive Zoom meeting information.
  • Disaster Preparedness and recovery for Historic Properties & Districts - TBA

 

To access the model plans, the guidebook, supporting materials, and the workshops visit the Oregon Heritage website at www.oregonheritage.org. For more information about Oregon Heritage contact i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri Gill at 503-383-6787.

 

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Attached Media Files: Historic Cottage Grove Armory
Big waves prompt beach safety alert - 11/12/20

With sneaker waves predicted Nov. 13-14 on the north Oregon Coast, followed by a "king tide" event Nov. 15-17, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) urges beachgoers to be safe.

The National Weather Service forecasts sneaker waves Friday and Saturday on north Oregon and south Washington beaches.

“Sneaker waves can surge up the beach, traveling much further inland than normal waves,” said OPRD Safety Specialist Robert Smith. “The common adage to ‘never turn your back to the ocean’ is even more important at this time.”

The sneaker wave warning ushers in the first of three extreme high tides, also called "king tides," on Nov. 15-17. King tides occur when the orbits and alignment of the Earth, moon, and sun combine to produce the greatest tidal effects of the year. The next occurances will be Dec. 13-15 and January 11-13, 2021.

“King tides bring huge waves, and naturally people want to come watch,” Smith said. “We want to remind you of a few tips to stay safe.”

He asks beachgoers to respect closures and barricades, stay off the sand and watch the waves from an elevated location well above the action.

More beach safety tips are on our Beach Safety page.

Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission meets Nov. 17-18 via conference call - 11/04/20

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will convene via conference call for their fifth and final meeting of the year Nov. 17-18.

Commissioners will meet 9-11 a.m. Nov. 17 for a workshop and training.

On Nov. 18, commissioners will meet at 8:30 a.m. for an executive session to discuss acquisition priorities and opportunities, and potential litigation. Executive sessions are closed to the public.

A business meeting will begin at 9:45 a.m. Members of the public will be able to listen to this call; instructions on how to attend will be available online prior to the meeting on the commission webpage on oregon.gov/oprd. The agenda also includes a time for public comment. To register, visit http://bit.ly/parkscommissionzoomnovember. Time per speaker is limited to three minutes.

Some of the requests on the business meeting agenda:

  • Open public discussion on rules to restrict vehicles on beaches in south Tillamook County near Pacific City and north of Tierra Del Mar (Oregon Administrative Rule 736-024-0015).
  • Open public discussion on rules for state park reservations (Oregon Administrative Rule 736-015-0015). The public process will address whether to change rules to allow more flexibility in the reservation window and transaction fees.

The full draft agenda and meeting packet are posted on the commission webpage on oregon.gov/oprd.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules, and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state.

Downtown Oregon City Association Receives Award for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 11/02/20

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2020 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners today and released videos of all the recipients. The Downtown Oregon City Association received the Best Image Event award for their 175th Anniversary Art Print. A total of fifteen businesses, projects, and people were recognized with this prestigious award. View the 175th Anniversary Art Print video here and view all award winner videos here.

The Downtown Oregon City Association created an art print campaign to commemorate 175 years of incorporation as a community with an accompanying “scavenger hunt” type activity to drive foot traffic into downtown businesses. The campaign included a commissioned art print from a local photographer who digitally manipulated photos of famous sites in Oregon City to compile a beautiful 12x16 art print. There were more than 15,000 views of their initial video on the launch of the project with an average of 25 people per week for 40 weeks visiting the 60 participating businesses.

Oregon Main Street’s Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards were created in 2010 to recognize the efforts of those who work day-in and day-out to revitalize Oregon’s historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods. 6 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards.

“What is particularly rewarding to see is how many individuals are giving their time, energy, and creativity to make their communities a better place,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Now more than ever it is important to celebrate our award winners. They serve as an inspiration to other communities. By their actions, they encourage others to join our Network to preserve the heart and soul of communities across our state. We thank them for their efforts and congratulate all our nominees on their achievements.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2019, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $112.1 million in private building improvement projects, $109.8 million in public projects, 1,262 private rehab projects, 644 net new businesses, 151 business expansions and 3,885 net new jobs. In addition, 241,761 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations in the top tiers.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

City of Klamath Falls and Klamath Falls Downtown Association Receive Award for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 11/02/20

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2020 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners today and released videos of all the recipients. The City of Klamath Falls and the Klamath Falls Downtown Association received the coveted Outstanding Partnership Award. A total of fifteen businesses, projects, and people were recognized. View City of Klamath Falls award here and view all award winners here

The Klamath Falls Downtown Association and the City of Klamath Falls have long partnered in revitalization efforts in downtown. Both have a vested interest in a flourishing, vibrant downtown, and time and again the partnership has demonstrated an ability to leverage limited resources into meaningful, impactful outcomes. The City contracts a number of downtown activities to KFDA, including management of banners and flowers, programming and scheduling for downtown parks, and marketing and promotion. Beyond that, the working relationship between the City and KFDA has created so much more value for downtown stakeholders, particularly in the wake of the significant disruption caused by COVID-19. As a result of this relationship, progressive ideas regularly receive legitimate consideration and those that are feasible move forward quickly. Rather than creating obstacles, the City is regularly a catalyst for ideas that support preservation-based revitalization under the Main Street framework. Economically, the result has also been significant. Aside from ongoing direct investment through the Facade & Building Improvement Grant, the City's response to COVID-19 immediately put $25,000 into local restaurants, as well as an additional $100,000 into business support programs that are still directly benefitting downtown businesses. 

Oregon Main Street’s Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards were created in 2010 to recognize the efforts of those who work day-in and day-out to revitalize Oregon’s historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods. 6 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards this year

“What is particularly rewarding to see is how many individuals are giving their time, energy, and creativity to make their communities a better place,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Now more than ever it is important to celebrate our award winners. They serve as an inspiration to other communities. By their actions, they encourage others to join our Network to preserve the heart and soul of communities across our state. We thank them for their efforts and congratulate all our nominees on their achievements.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2019, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $112.1 million in private building improvement projects, $109.8 million in public projects, 1,262 private rehab projects, 644 net new businesses, 151 business expansions and 3,885 net new jobs. In addition, 241,761 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations in the top tiers.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Beaverton and Hillsboro Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 11/02/20

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2020 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners today and released videos of all the recipients. A total of fifteen businesses, projects, and people were recognized. Five of those recognized were from Beaverton and Hillsboro based on nominations submitted by the Beaverton Downtown Association (BDA) and the Hillsboro Downtown Partnership (HDP).

Hillsboro

  • White Birch Design Co. won the coveted Business of the Year award. White Birch Design Co. has been in operation since 2012 as an interior design company highlighting the creativity of owner Darcy DeBord. After opening her dream shop with the assistance of her husband and friends, the business has expanded twice over the years and most recently into their new 10,000 square foot space which brings retail, design services, and a small café under one roof. Darcy was an active member of HDP's Board and Design Committee for two years, until she needed to focus on her business expansions. She still contributes new business leads and support for new businesses on a regular basis, as well as helping to create many district-wide promotional events.
  • Hillsboro Downtown Association’s Idea Sharing rubric won the award for Best Organizational Tool. Community members were coming to the HDP with great ideas but they didn’t have a process in place for people's ideas to be heard, acknowledged, and get connected with resources. They came up with the “Idea Sharing” project to make sure all ideas are taken into consideration through a consistent process and realistically supported through implementation if they meet sufficient parameters. And, it came in handy recently when HDP decided to reach out to high school students whose extracurricular activities have been halted or limited due to Covid-19. With items already through the vetting process, students could pick different projects they wanted to work on – a win-win for HDP and the students!

Beaverton

  • The Beaverton Downtown Association won the Best Placemaking Project Award for their CoSign project. One of the challenges for downtown Beaverton is to create an identity. The CoSign project, a partnership with the American Sign Museum, local businesses, local artists, City of Beaverton, local architects, and sign designers, is helping to change that by creating amazing seven new business signs, most of them having an element of neon or 3D design. It has already been a great economic development tool by giving greater visibility to businesses. View award video.
  • Sophia Slack won the award for Volunteer of the Year.  In 2018, Sophia Slack joined the Beaverton Downtown Association as the voting Youth Representative on the Board of Directors. Sophia began leading the social media team, quadrupling the number of Instagram quadrupled in followers. Kevin Teater, BDA’s executive director, has received messages and emails from people saying, "Your social media is so great! How can I volunteer or get involved?" He lets them know that it is all a result of Sophia and the other social media team members. In 2019, Sophia decided to take the next step and become the Secretary of the Board. Sophia also joined BDA’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion policy planning team, helping to recruit other team members with expertise in this area. Sophia is now attending college but she made significant contributions to helping BDA grow and thrive. View award video.
  • Kevin Teater won the award for Executive Director of the Year. Kevin Teater has only been the executive director of the Beaverton Downtown Association for two years. During this time, he has been central in strengthening the reputation of the BDA growing it from a small but dedicated core of 6 volunteers to over fifty. City leadership now view the BDA as a powerful ally of downtown Beaverton. He did this by making sure that volunteers, patrons, business and property owners walk away from any BDA interaction feeling positive. Kevin has also had an impact on a statewide level. At the start of the pandemic, he took the initiative to start weekly check-in calls with the OMS Network. These have been so well received that Oregon Main Street is continuing them as a normal part of business.  View award video.

Oregon Main Street’s Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards were created in 2010 to recognize the efforts of those who work day-in and day-out to revitalize Oregon’s historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods. 6 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards this year. View all award videos here

“What is particularly rewarding to see is how many individuals are giving their time, energy, and creativity to make their communities a better place,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Now more than ever it is important to celebrate our award winners. They serve as an inspiration to other communities. By their actions, they encourage others to join our Network to preserve the heart and soul of communities across our state. We thank them for their efforts and congratulate all our nominees on their achievements.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2019, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $112.1 million in private building improvement projects, $109.8 million in public projects, 1,262 private rehab projects, 644 net new businesses, 151 business expansions and 3,885 net new jobs. In addition, 241,761 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations in the top tiers.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Bandon and Reedsport Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 11/02/20

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2020 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners today and released videos of all the recipients. A total of fifteen businesses, projects, and people were recognized. Three of those recognized were from Bandon and Reedsport based on nominations submitted by the Greater Bandon Association and Reedsport Main Street.

Bandon

  • Best Special Project went to Greater Bandon Association’s Greater Than Golf fundraiser. Sometimes extraordinary circumstances call on our local main street organizations to undertake initiatives that might not fall within their typical prevue. That’s the case with the GBA’s Greater Than Golf one-month fundraising campaign to create a relief fund for the caddies at Bandon Dunes Golf Resort which closed operations due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Over 350 caddies work at The Dunes four courses as independent contractors, making up as much as 15% of Bandon’s work force. Working with a core of concerned Bandon Dunes professionals, GBA raised $300,000 which was distributed to 259 eligible caddies. View award video.
  • Best Adaptive Reuse went to the 640 2nd Building owned by Heidi Sause. Heidi’s vision was to turn the vast space, used primarily for retail, storage, and classes by Forget-Me-Knots quilt shop, into a multi-use building. To accomplish the vision required work on both the exterior and interior of the building all which needed to be accomplished within FEMA restrictions. Now, Forget-Me-Knots occupies one of the retail spaces on the first floor. Bandon Rain is a new tenant and a good complement to Face Rock Creamery across the street. Upstairs has been converted into a two-bedroom, two-bathroom luxury apartment. The Greater Bandon Association was involved in this project from the outset providing support throughout the permitting process. View award video.

Reedsport

  • Best Façade Rehabilitation went to the Welcome Hotel. One of the first buildings visible when entering downtown Reedsport on westbound Highway 38, it didn’t present a very inviting welcome due to its deteriorated condition. The second floor of the building was severely damaged in a fire about 25 years ago and windows were boarded up. It has been on the wish list of Reedsport Main Street for many years to see something happen. Enter a new property owner, Robb Crocker, with the vision and expertise to bring this building back to life. The façade improvement included restoring the entire façade as close as possible to the original 1925 appearance of the “Welcome Hotel” according to available records, including the transom windows which were partially funded through a grant managed by Reedsport Main Street.  View award video.

Oregon Main Street’s Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards were created in 2010 to recognize the efforts of those who work day-in and day-out to revitalize Oregon’s historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods. 6 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards this year. View videos of all award winners here

“What is particularly rewarding to see is how many individuals are giving their time, energy, and creativity to make their communities a better place,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Now more than ever it is important to celebrate our award winners. They serve as an inspiration to other communities. By their actions, they encourage others to join our Network to preserve the heart and soul of communities across our state. We thank them for their efforts and congratulate all our nominees on their achievements.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2019, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $112.1 million in private building improvement projects, $109.8 million in public projects, 1,262 private rehab projects, 644 net new businesses, 151 business expansions and 3,885 net new jobs. In addition, 241,761 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations in the top tiers.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Astoria Receives Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 11/02/20

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2020 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners today and released videos of all the recipients. A total of fifteen businesses, projects, and people were recognized. Two of those recognized were from Astoria based on nominations submitted by the Astoria Downtown Historic District Association.

  • Blaylock’s Whiskey Bar won the Best New Business of the Year award. In 2019, what started as a fun idea snowballed to reality when Blaylock’s Whiskey Bar founders, Michael Angiletta and Seth Howard, signed the lease on a vacant 1920’s Art Deco building. Cory Teubner, a multi-year “Bartender of the Year” winner and Ben Thompson, a whiskey aficionado with over 15 years in the industry, joined the team. When Seth stepped away in late 2019, Michael offered both Cory and Ben a piece of what they helped create and both are now part owners. Michael, Ben, and Cory also deserve credit for their response to statewide closure of bars due to the pandemic. Blaylock’s partnered with six local food carts and chefs to provide a unique curbside takeout experience: pre-mixed servings of your favorite Blaylock’s cocktail mix combined with delicious local cuisine. View award video.
  • Astoria Downtown Historic District Association’s Glass Tile Grant received the Best Historic Preservation Project award. The Astoria Downtown Historic District Association wanted to restore and preserve the sidewalk prisms installed almost 100 years ago to let sunlight into below-grade spaces. Many of the glass tiles are cracked, broken, or completely missing creating a pedestrian hazard. There aren’t any sources for this type of glass tile today so the ADHDA works with a local artisan to make their own. ADHDA developed a matching grant program in partnership with the City of Astoria to help cover the cost which business match. ADHDA provides volunteer labor for the installation. This project is a great example of perseverance on the part of ADHDA to preserve a piece of their community’s history while improving accessibility for all. View award video.

Oregon Main Street’s Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards were created in 2010 to recognize the efforts of those who work day-in and day-out to revitalize Oregon’s historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods. 6 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards this year. View videos of all award winners here

“What is particularly rewarding to see is how many individuals are giving their time, energy, and creativity to make their communities a better place,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Now more than ever it is important to celebrate our award winners. They serve as an inspiration to other communities. By their actions, they encourage others to join our Network to preserve the heart and soul of communities across our state. We thank them for their efforts and congratulate all our nominees on their achievements.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2019, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $112.1 million in private building improvement projects, $109.8 million in public projects, 1,262 private rehab projects, 644 net new businesses, 151 business expansions and 3,885 net new jobs. In addition, 241,761 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations in the top tiers.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Albany Receives Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 11/02/20

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2020 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners today and released videos of all recipients. A total of fifteen businesses, projects, and people were recognized. Three of those recognized were from Albany based on nominations submitted by the Albany Downtown Association.

  • Best Upper Floor Rehabilitation went to B-Still loftsFor years, Andrea Still had a vision to bring upscale living to a former upstairs storage space in her building. After façade improvements to the building in 2018 to preserve the historic character, it was time to take on the 10,000 sq. foot upper floor interior space. Acting as her own contractor, Andrea designed five premier lofts. The Albany Downtown Association provided support and encouragement throughout the project. This is the second year in a row this award went to a project in downtown Albany (last year’s winner was 206½ Hotel). View award video.
  • Best Retail Activity went to the Albany Downtown Association’s Drive Up Downtown created to promote restaurants and businesses in downtown were open for curbside delivery when businesses were closed statewide due to Covid-19. The promotion was marketed with daily posts on Facebook listing the open businesses, their method of service (curbside, delivery, etc.), and that day's hours of operation. Feedback was positive from the start with businesses and customers thanking ADA for providing this connection. View award video.
  • Board Member of the Year went to Oscar Hult with the Albany Downtown Association. Oscar has volunteered for the Albany Downtown Association off and on for over 31 years. Most of that time was spent on the Design Committee, volunteering at events, and on the board of directors. As a business owner and community partner, Oscar has also created events to bring people to Downtown Albany to appreciate its unique architecture as well as retail and dining opportunities. Oscar recently acquired a historic building in downtown and will be dedicating much of his efforts to bring the building back to its former glory, creating a new space for The Natty Dresser, and developing new uses for the multi-story iconic structure. He lives ADA’s goal of historic preservation through economic development. View award video.

Oregon Main Street’s Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards were created in 2010 to recognize the efforts of those who work day-in and day-out to revitalize Oregon’s historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods. 6 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards this year. View videos of all award winners here

“What is particularly rewarding to see is how many individuals are giving their time, energy, and creativity to make their communities a better place,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Now more than ever it is important to celebrate our award winners. They serve as an inspiration to other communities. By their actions, they encourage others to join our Network to preserve the heart and soul of communities across our state. We thank them for their efforts and congratulate all our nominees on their achievements.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2019, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $112.1 million in private building improvement projects, $109.8 million in public projects, 1,262 private rehab projects, 644 net new businesses, 151 business expansions and 3,885 net new jobs. In addition, 241,761 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations in the top tiers.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Oregon Main Street Recognizes Business of the Year Among Fourteen Other Recipients of the Prestigious Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards - 11/02/20

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2020 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners recognizing outstanding achievements in local main street efforts between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020. For the first time, the honorees were announced with the release of videos of each of the individuals, businesses, and projects who received this prestigious award. View all videos here.

The fifteen projects, businesses, & individuals honored are:

  • Best New Business – Blaylock's Whiskey Bar, Astoria (Award Video)
  • Business of the Year – White Birch Design Co., Hillsboro. (Award Video)
  • Best Adaptive Reuse – 640 2nd Building, Bandon (Award Video)
  • Best Placemaking Project – Beaverton Downtown Association’s CoSign Project, Beaverton (Award Video)
  • Best Façade Renovation – Welcome Hotel, Reedsport (Award Video)
  • Best Upper Floor Renovation – B-Still Lofts, Albany (Award Video)
  • Best Historic Preservation Project – Glass Tile Grant, Astoria (Award Video)
  • Best Downtown Retail Activity – Drive Up Downtown, Albany (Award Video)
  • Best Image Event – Downtown Oregon City Association’s 175th Anniversary Art Print, Oregon City (Award Video)
  • Best Special Project – Greater Than Golf, Bandon (Award Video)
  • Outstanding Partnership – City of Klamath Falls (Award Video)
  • Best Organizational Tool – Idea Sharing, Hillsboro (Award Video)
  • Volunteer of the Year – Sophia Slack, Beaverton (Award Video)
  • Board Member of the Year – Oscar Hult, Albany (Award Video)
  • Main Street Manager of the Year – Beaverton Downtown Association’s Kevin Teater, Beaverton (Award Video)

Oregon Main Street’s Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards were created in 2010 to recognize the efforts of those who work day-in and day-out to revitalize Oregon’s historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods.

“What is particularly rewarding to see is how many individuals are giving their time, energy, and creativity to make their communities a better place,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Now more than ever it is important to celebrate our award winners. They serve as an inspiration to other communities. By their actions, they encourage others to join our Network to preserve the heart and soul of communities across our state. We thank them for their efforts and congratulate all our nominees on their achievements.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2019, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $112.1 million in private building improvement projects, $109.8 million in public projects, 1,262 private rehab projects, 644 net new businesses, 151 business expansions and 3,885 net new jobs. In addition, 241,761 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations in the top tiers.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.