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Triangle Lake Round Barn Listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 07/24/17

John P. Sumich completed construction of the round barn in 1949, three years after construction began in 1946. Sumich's use of concrete blocks and other locally sourced materials represents a creative interpretation of the round barn type that has been used in the United States beginning in the 1800's into the early 20th century, when it became popularized by agricultural schools for its efficiency. The historic building is a unique vernacular expression of a round dairy barn type that was popularized in the 1910s and 1920s for its reputation for enhancing farm practice efficiency and improving sanitary conditions. While it is unclear exactly where Sumich saw the original design that inspired him, there was no similar round barn construction in Oregon. The barn is eligible under National Register Criterion C for architecture as a local example of a vernacular round dairy barn type. During this time in Lane County, dairying and creameries continued to develop as a major industry. The Lake Creek Valley, where the barn is located, was also a thriving timber community with several sawmills, shingle mills, and the churches, schools, post offices and general stores that supported the population in this time frame. The round barn was and remains a landmark in the community.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination in February 2017. The Triangle Lake Round barn is among the 135 properties in Lane County that are individually listed in the National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Jacob Clearwater Farmhouse listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 07/24/17

The 1874 Jacob and Missouri Benner Clearwater House is locally significant under National Register Criterion C, in the area of architecture. The Clearwater family, including sons Jacob and James, participated in the western migration of the mid-to-late 1800s to Oregon, traveling the Oregon Trail, like so many before them. The family settled on 320 acres outside of Springfield, Oregon, along the Middle Fork of the Willamette River in the Willamette Valley, in 1865. They proceeded to clear the land and begin farming the land on which the Jacob Clearwater Farmhouse is still located. Jacob married Missouri Benner in 1888 and the couple and their family resided at this location, engaging in row crop cultivation, dairy and beef cattle ranching, and hop farming. Prior to his marriage, Jacob and his father constructed the house known as the Jacob and Missouri Benner Clearwater Farmhouse today. The house is an excellent, rural example of the Gothic Revival style in Lane County. It is one of only four previously identified, remaining single-family residences built before 1874 in Springfield. Although the style and type were once relatively common, the Clearwater Farmhouse is the only example of the centered gable subtype of the Gothic Revival style extant in Springfield today. The house retains good integrity, and clearly conveys its historic significance, evident in its appearance and style, including its massing, materials, and overall design.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination in February 2017. The Clearwater Farmhouse is among the eight properties in Springfield that are individually listed in the National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Portland Sanitarium Nurses' Quarters listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 07/24/17

The Nurses' Quarters served the student nurses and full-time nurses of the Portland Sanitarium, a hospital operated by the Seventh Day Adventists. The building is emblematic of the changing position of nursing as an educational field and profession. During the early- and mid-twentieth century, the health care industry was evolving. As the methods of treatment changed, so too did the means of educating medical professionals. At this time nursing education shifted from an apprenticeship-like training regime with long hours of hands-on hospital work to a pre-professional curriculum paired with shifts at the hospital. Improvements and changing features of Nurses' Quarters were parallel to the changes in nursing education and professional nursing, creating less of a room-and-board arrangement and more of a round-the-clock studying and on-call hospital work setting.

The Portland Sanitarium Nurses' Quarters is locally significant and eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A for its association with Health/Medicine. This building was designated a historic landmark by the City of Portland on September 25, 2016.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination in February 2017. The Portland Sanitarium Nurses' Quarters is among the 596 properties in Portland that are individually listed in the National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

The Pine Grove Community House in Manzanita is one of Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places. (Photo) - 07/24/17

Built in 1933, the Pine Grove Community House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A for the building's association with the founding of the City of Manzanita and its local government, establishment of community social events, and the gradual evolution of the town to a full-fledged community and center for coastal recreation. Pine Grove represents the first tangible civic project of the first residents of Manzanita who, with no early municipal government, formed their own community group to address the needs and management of their small town. In the absence of more formal, city-run facilities, the Pine Grove Community House served as Manzanita's first City Hall and library. Pine Grove not only functioned as Manzanita's early central government, but hosted meetings resulting in the formation of the first fire and police departments. The Pine Grove Community House has grown with the City of Manzanita and served many functions that are now carried on in different facilities, but it was at the Pine Grove that all of these activities began and flourished sufficiently to create the need for expansion beyond the building in which they began. Among the founders was Ben S. Lane, who would later serve the City of Manzanita as its first mayor and serving the City in that capacity for thirteen years. Lane's wife, Johanna Lane, brought a love for reading and community service that made the Lanes a formidable couple. The Pine Grove Community House tells part of the story of coastal recreation towns and the settlement of the Oregon Coast, including the transition from mere vacation destination to a formal community and eventual municipality.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination in February 2017. The Pine Grove Community House is among the nine properties in Manzanita that are individually listed in the National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Standard shark sighting sign posted in Oregon
Standard shark sighting sign posted in Oregon
Shark sightings reported off Oregon north coast prompt advisory (Photo) - 07/19/17

News Release
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 19, 2017

Media Contact:
Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Cell: 503-931-2590

Reported shark sightings in Cannon Beach and Seaside prompt advisory

Cannon Beach OR -- A person surfing off the north Oregon coast around Haystack Rock near Cannon Beach, and a visitor in Seaside both reported shark sightings Tuesday, July 18. State park staff have posted advisory signs in both areas. No injuries were reported. The beaches will remain open, and the advisory signs will stay up for several weeks at least.

As a natural, wild place, people coming to the Oregon coast can prepare themselves to enjoy the ocean shore by visiting http://respectthebeach.org/. For people using the ocean offshore, especially surfers, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department recommends consulting fellow surfers for advice since the agency doesn't manage the ocean shore below low tide. In an emergency, beach visitors should call 911 and explain their location in as much detail as possible. Many developed beach accesses have signs with names and numbers to help visitors pinpoint their location.

The size and species of the sightings are unknown, and the reports haven't been verified. More than a dozen shark species live off the Oregon coast.

Salmonberry Trail meeting set for August 4 In Grand Ronde - 07/18/17

Grand Ronde, OR - The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency will meet at Spirit Mountain Casino on August 4 to discuss issues related to ownership and management of the proposed 84-mile Salmonberry Trail corridor that will connect the cities of Tillamook and Banks. The meeting will be from 10 am to 1 pm at Spirit Mountain Casino, 27100 SW Salmon River Highway in Grand Ronde.

The agenda includes an update on fundraising efforts, status of a proposed rail banking and lease agreement, and an update on Valley segment planning.

The Salmonberry Trail will connect eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the rugged Oregon Coast Range. The route follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway, which closed in 2007 after massive storm damage. The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information, contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov.

Heritage Commission to meet July 23-24 in Roseburg - 07/10/17

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Roseburg July 23-24.

On July 23, Commissioners will gather at 12:30 p.m. to tour heritage efforts including the Douglas County Museum, IOOF Historic Cemetery, Floed-Lane House, and Oregon Main Street.

On July 24, a public business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Douglas County Museum located at 123 Museum Drive. Its agenda includes review and discussion of the Oregon Heritage Plan 2014-2019, Oregon Heritage Traditions, Oregon Heritage Conference 2018 in Bend, a statewide digitization initiative, and technical outreach services.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

For more information, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Todd Mayberry at 503-986-0696 or Todd.Mayberry@oregon.gov.

Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council seeking award nominees - 07/05/17

The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) is requesting nominations for its annual Doug Newman Recreation Trails Achievement Award. The nominations provide an opportunity to acknowledge individuals, organizations, agencies and businesses that, through their hard work, integrity and social responsibility, have made outstanding contributions that promote, enhance or expand public awareness and use of Oregon's non-motorized trails.

Named after late ORTAC member Doug Newman, the award recognizes the nominees for their notable achievements, leadership, and commitment of considerable time and skill in working with others to achieve important trail milestones resulting in statewide impact.

Award recipients will receive a commemorative plaque and two complimentary tickets to the Trails Summit Awards Luncheon in October. Nominations must be received by September 1. Details can be found at OPRD Trails Programs and Services.

The council advises the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its allies in the development and promotion of high quality, non-motorized trail systems. Through public meetings and various trail programs, ORTAC assists in creating, improving and promoting a system of safe, sustainable trails for the well-being and enjoyment of Oregon's residents and visitors.

Oregon provides diverse, high quality trail experiences that reflect the state's remarkable environmental and cultural diversity. ORTAC believes that trail needs and challenges are best addressed through collaboration among all stakeholders, and the utilization of common sense and innovative responses. These trail endeavors inspire all of us to a strong sense of stewardship for our natural and cultural heritage.

For additional information on the Doug Newman Awards Program contact David Stipe, OPRD Manager of Planning + Design at David.Stipe@oregon.gov or 503.709.6202. You can also contact Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC Chair at lsven@peak.org or 541.547.3640.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department taking comments on rule amendments covering fees for agency public records - 07/01/17

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 1, 2017

Contact: Chris Havel, 503-986-0722 (desk), 503-931-2590 (cell)

Salem OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is proposing amendments to agency rules related to fees for public records. The rule hasn't been updated in decades, and the amendments would make the department's rules consistent with Oregon agency standards. The deadline for public comment on the amendments is July 31, 2017.

Current rules still contain references to facsimiles, audio tapes, and printed photographs, formats which have largely been replaced by their digital equivalents. The other changes increase hourly rates for staff time needed to fulfill record requests, and specify reduced or waived rates when necessary to serve the public interest.

The department fulfills 8-10 formal public record requests a year. Because most records are already digital, it normally satisfies the requests by delivering the documents over the Internet at no charge for either materials or staff time.

The full text of the amendment to Oregon Administrative Rule 736-001-0030 is available online at http://bit.ly/1m7LOjF, and public comments will be accepted in writing (OPRD, ATTN: Chris Havel, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301) or by email (OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov) through 5 p.m., July 31, 2017. After reviewing public comments, agency staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its September 20 business meeting.

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Volunteer recruitment and management workshop offered July 14 in Brookings - 06/30/17

Oregon Heritage, part of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is offering a free workshop on volunteer recruitment and management 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. July 14 at the Chetco Community Public Library, 405 Alder Street, Brookings.

From nonprofits to community startups, anyone is welcome to attend. The workshop will include tips on getting new volunteers, organizing and tracking tasks, and showing appreciation. Come learn about creative and time-tested ideas to engage the skills and background of people who help power the work that you do.

Information about and registration for the workshop can be found at www.oregonheritage.org and questions may be sent to Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

Historic Cemeteries Commission meets July 14 in Brookings - 06/30/17

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet at 1 p.m. July 14 at the Chetco Community Public Library, 405 Alder Street, Brookings. Agenda items will include cemetery ownership, statewide cemetery clean-up days, grant projects, current projects and upcoming plans. The commission will invite public comments. For information visit the historic cemeteries page of www.oregonheritage.org.

State law established the seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances.

Requests for information about the meeting and accessibility may be made to coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council looking for new members - 06/29/17

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is taking applications for new members to serve on the Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) for Congressional District 5. The district covers all of Clackamas, Lincoln, Marion, Polk, and Tillamook Counties.

The council advises OPRD and its allies in the development and promotion of high quality, non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon. Through public meetings and various trail programs, ORTAC assists in creating, improving and promoting a system of safe, sustainable trails for the well-being and enjoyment of Oregon's residents and visitors alike.

ORTAC consists of seven members, including at least one from each congressional district, and at least two members from separate counties bordering the coast. Members of the Council are appointed by the OPRD Commission, serve at the pleasure of the Commission for four-year terms, and are eligible for reappointment. Members review applications for state designated trails, may serve on a variety of other OPRD committees, may assist in the evaluation of trail-related grant applications, and aid in the development of the 10-year statewide Trail Plans. The council conducts four public meetings a year, each in a different region of the state.

Oregon provides diverse, high quality trail experiences that reflect the state's remarkable environmental and cultural diversity. ORTAC believes that trail needs and challenges are best addressed through collaboration among all stakeholders, and the utilization of common sense and innovative responses. These trail endeavors inspire all of us to a strong sense of stewardship for our natural and cultural heritage.

All interested parties should contact David Stipe at (503) 986-0740 or by email at david.stipe@oregon.gov for more information or to obtain an ORTAC Interest Form. The deadline for submitting the form is August 15.

Grants awarded for historic properties and archaeology projects throughout the state - 06/29/17

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 16 grants totaling $213,035 for historic properties and archaeology projects. Four of the grants were awarded in the Diamonds in the Rough category. This grant funds façade enhancements that restore the historic character of the property. The other 12 grants were in the Preserving Oregon category for properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places and for archaeology projects.

Funded projects include:
* Façade restoration grants in Astoria, Baker City, Burns and Kerby.
* Archaeology projects in Lincoln City, Douglas County and along the Oregon coast.
* Preservation of nine historic properties in Deschutes County, Hood River County, Lane County, Medford, Moro, Roseburg, Salem, Stayton and Union.
These grants are approved by the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation. The State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) is a nine-member group that reviews nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The members are professionally recognized in the fields of history, architecture, archaeology and other related disciplines.

The Committee is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. To learn more about the Preserving Oregon grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council to meet July 21 in Astoria - 06/28/17

Astoria OR -- The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 21 at the Holiday Inn Express, 204 West Marine Drive in Astoria. The council invites public comments during the morning session. Local trail advocates and land managers will present information about trail projects and initiatives in the area.

ORTAC will also seek public comment on the designation of a new state Scenic Bikeway near Prineville. The proposed Crooked River Canyon Scenic Bikeway is a scenic 17-mile one-way route that starts in Prineville and winds its way up the Crooked River to Prineville Reservoir. Citizens interested in providing public comment, but are unable to attend the public meeting, can provide written comment to Alex Phillips, Bikeways and Waterways Coordinator with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) at alex.phillips@oregon.gov.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise OPRD and to promote non-motorized trail recreation and development in Oregon. The Council is made up of seven volunteer members appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission to represent the five Oregon congressional districts. The Council meets four times annually in different locations across the state. For more information about the meeting or about ORTAC, contact David Stipe, Planning + Design Manager, at 503.986.0740, david.stipe@oregon.gov.