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Garrick Imatani, “Plank House,” 2018. Archival pigment print. Detail from installation “Lessons from a Falling Star.” University of Oregon.
Garrick Imatani, “Plank House,” 2018. Archival pigment print. Detail from installation “Lessons from a Falling Star.” University of Oregon.
Oregon's state art collection featured on new Oregon Arts Commission website (Photo) - 03/18/19

Oregon’s public collection of more than 2,400 artworks acquired and commissioned since 1975 is now featured on a searchable website for all to view. The State of Oregon Percent for Art Collection includes paintings, works on paper, photography, sculpture, ceramics, glass, mosaics, murals, textiles and both site-specific and structurally integrated art installations by over 800 artists. A number of commissioned temporary works can also be found on the website.

The artworks, installed across the state, can be found in public buildings from La Grande to Corvallis and Medford to Portland, including on campuses of higher education at University of Oregon, Portland State University, Oregon State University, Southern Oregon University, Eastern Oregon University, Western Oregon University and Oregon Institute of Technology.

The new online interface allows Oregonians or visitors to experience the state’s art collection remotely or to plan visits to view art in person. Robust search capabilities allow tailored searches—for a teacher creating class curriculum, a student doing research or a curious member of the public.

Highlights of the collection include:

  • Two- and three-dimensional works by seminal Oregon artists including Louis Bunce, Sally Haley, Manuel Izquierdo, George Johanson, James Lavadour and Lucinda Parker.
  • Temporary artworks, including “Information Studio” (2008) by Tahni Holt, an interactive dance installation created during a month-long residency at Portland State University. The site-specific work transformed a glass enclosed meeting room at the Smith Memorial Student Union into a stage where performers followed directions via headphones to realize Holt’s choreography.
  • Integrated works like Henk Pander’s “The Road” (2006), a largescale painting of an imagined traffic accident based on the artist’s experiences riding along with various Oregon police, sheriff and fire departments. The painting was commissioned for the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.
  • Memorials, such as Lead Pencil Studio’s “OSH Patient Memorial” (2014) at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem, which respectfully commemorates more than 3,400 individuals who passed away in Oregon state institutions from 1913 to 1970. The memorial includes a building displaying the historical metal canisters that held the ashes of individuals not claimed by family members. Facing this, a columbarium wall holds newly created ceramic urns with the inscribed names and living dates of the remains represented within.
  • Recent commissions include “Lessons from a Falling Star” (2018) by Garrick Imatani, installed at the University of Oregon. This project traces the legacy of “Tomanowas” (The Willamette Meteorite), which came to Oregon via the Missoula Floods approximately 15,000 years ago. The artist worked with the Clackamas tribe (part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde), who consider “Tomanowas” a sacred object, to 3D scan the meteorite and photograph current tribe members with a 3D printed replica in response to archival images showing the meteorite as discovered. A second aluminum replica of the meteorite is suspended in the atrium of Straub Hall in front of a mural showing water levels during the Missoula Floods.

Oregon was one of the first states in the nation to pass Percent for Art legislation, setting aside no less than 1 percent of funds for the acquisition of public-facing artwork in all state building construction projects with budgets over $100,000. Since 1975, the Percent for Art program has placed high-quality, accessible and mostly permanent art in public places. Over 275 state construction projects have qualified for Percent for Art funds and more than 2,000 Oregonians have taken part in the selection of artwork for their state's higher education campuses and government facilities. The program, managed by the Oregon Arts Commission, remains dedicated to the enhancement of public environments and the improvement of the character and quality of state buildings.

Link to State of Oregon Percent for Art Collection website: http://state-of-oregon-art-collection.org/final/Portal.aspx

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The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 


The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.

Belise with (left) Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford and (right) Arts Commission Executive Director Brian Rogers
Belise with (left) Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford and (right) Arts Commission Executive Director Brian Rogers
Belise Nishimwe of St. Mary's Academy named Oregon's Poetry Out Loud champion; Nicole Coronado of Lake Oswego named runner up (Photo) - 03/11/19

Salem, Oregon – Belise Nishimwe, a sophomore at St. Mary’s Academy in Portland, is the 2019 Oregon Poetry Out Loud state champion. Nishimwe was one of nine regional finalists who competed at Saturday’s state Poetry Out Loud contest at Salem Public Library. She advances to the national Poetry Out Loud competition, scheduled for April 29-May 1 in Washington, D.C.

Nicole Coronado, a senior at Lakeridge High School, was named runner up. If Nishimwe (pronounced knee-sheem-way) is unable to attend the national competition Coronado would be invited to represent Oregon.

Extremely passionate about social justice and law especially as it pertains to immigrants and their rights, Nishimwe was born and lived in a refugee camp in Tanzania until the age of five, when she and her family moved to America through Catholic Charities. Now a U.S. citizen, she has dedicated herself to being someone who can create a platform that gives voice to immigrants and refugees and the representation they need.

"This is everyone’s victory,” said Nishimwe. “I want to represent refugees and immigrants in a good light. I wanted to do Poetry Out Loud because when I was younger I wanted that representation that I rarely ever saw. I wanted to see other immigrants like me participate in a variety of activities and succeed, so that I could know that I could achieve that too.”

The poems Nishimwe presented at the state contest were: “Love’s Philosophy” by Percy Bysshe Shelley; “If We Must Die,” by Claude McKay; and “Worth” by Marilyn Nelson.

“When I listened to Belise deliver poetry to a silent room I recognized her genius is a combination of skill and courage,” said Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford, who attended and presented at the state contest. “Poetry comes up from the earth through her voice to the world.”

“Belise’s poise, power and presence make her an outstanding representative for Oregon at the national contest,” said Deb Vaughn, Arts Commission arts education/Poetry Out Loud coordinator. “We are thrilled to watch her shine among her peers in Washington D.C. next month.”

The other six students who competed, after advancing in regional contests, are: Christina Brennan, Oregon Connections Academy, Mill City; Amy Jarvie, Oregon School for the Deaf, Salem (2018 state runner up); Aynika Nelson, Brookings-Harbor High School, Brookings; Kaiden Randall, West Linn High School; Gabriella Shirtcliff, Summit High School, Bend; Megan Southard, Bonanza High School, Klamath Falls; and Hannah VonHolle, Logos Public Charter School, Medford.

Poetry Out Loud is a national recitation contest for high school students, organized in Oregon by the Oregon Arts Commission in collaboration with the NEA and the Poetry Foundation. Participants memorize and present poems, practicing public speaking skills while exploring the complexity of poetry.

Editor’s note:  View a clip of Nishimwe performing and her reaction when she was named state champion: https://youtu.be/RRV86QLUaCY

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The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 


The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at:  www.oregonartscommission.org.

 

 

(left to right) Amy Jarvie, Oregon School for the Deaf, Salem (2018 state runner up); Gabriella Shirtcliff, Summit High School, Bend; and Nicole Coronado, Lakeridge High School, Lake Oswego.
(left to right) Amy Jarvie, Oregon School for the Deaf, Salem (2018 state runner up); Gabriella Shirtcliff, Summit High School, Bend; and Nicole Coronado, Lakeridge High School, Lake Oswego.
Nine Oregon high school students advance to March 9 state Poetry Out Loud competition (Photo) - 03/05/19

Salem, Oregon – Regional Poetry Out Loud competitions held in Medford, Portland and Salem Saturday identified the nine Oregon high school students who are invited to compete for the 2019 state title on Saturday, March 9. Three finalists were selected from each regional competition.

Poetry Out Loud is a national contest for high school students, organized in Oregon by the Oregon Arts Commission in collaboration with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation. Participants memorize and present poems, practicing public performance skills while exploring the complexity of poetry.

The winners of the Southern Regional Contest, hosted at Rogue Community College, are: Aynika Nelson, Brookings-Harbor High School, Brookings; Megan Southard, Bonanza High School, Klamath Falls; and Hannah VonHolle, Logos Public Charter School, Medford.

The three top finishers from the Portland Regional Contest, held at Lewis and Clark College, are: Christina Brennan, Oregon Connections Academy, Mill City; Belise Nishimwe, St. Mary’s Academy, Portland; and Kaiden Randall, West Linn High School.

Finalists selected at the Central Regional Contest at Salem’s Allied Video Productions Studio are: Nicole Coronado, Lakeridge High School, Lake Oswego; Amy Jarvie, Oregon School for the Deaf, Salem (2018 state runner up); and Gabriella Shirtcliff, Summit High School, Bend.

          “As we have come to expect over the 14 years of Poetry Out Loud in Oregon, the caliber of performances was impressive and made selecting only three finalists from each region a challenge,” said Deb Vaughn, the Arts Commission’s arts education/Poetry Out Loud coordinator.

The State Contest is scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. in Loucks Auditorium at Salem Public Library (585 Liberty Street SE). The winner will be invited to advance to the national Poetry Out Loud competition, scheduled for April 29-May 1 in Washington, D.C.

Editor’s note: Photos and bio information are available upon request.

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The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 


The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at:  www.oregonartscommission.org.