Oregon Dept. of Forestry
Emergency Messages as of 9:30 pm, Fri. Oct. 30
No information currently posted.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Dept. of Forestry.
Primary email address for a new account:

  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
Land managers use controlled burns when weather conditions will carry smoke aloft and disperse it. Such burns remove woody fuels in hopes of reducing the risk of higher intensity wildfires, which produce much more smoke and often occur when air currents a
Land managers use controlled burns when weather conditions will carry smoke aloft and disperse it. Such burns remove woody fuels in hopes of reducing the risk of higher intensity wildfires, which produce much more smoke and often occur when air currents a
Controlled burns to reduce forest fuels and lower risk of high-intensity wildfires are now underway (Photo) - 10/28/20

SALEM, Ore. – Oregonians in forested areas may see smoke from a number of controlled burns – known as prescribed burns – this fall and winter. Forest landowners use the burns to eliminate woody fuels that build up on their land from forest thinning and after timber harvests.

This year’s fall burning season coincides with a rise in COVID-19 cases in Oregon. Smoke may worsen symptoms for people coping with compromised health or lung function due to COVID-19. The Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) current smoke rules minimize smoke from entering certain populated cities and areas known as Smoke Sensitive Receptor Areas (SSRAs).

ODF Smoke Management Program Manager Nick Yonker says, “To protect people with impaired lung function due to COVID-19, we’ve coordinated with the Oregon Health Authority to ensure that during the pandemic we will govern prescribed burns in counties experiencing higher levels of COVID-19 under older, tighter smoke regulations. Those define any amount of smoke from a prescribed burn into an SSRA as an intrusion. We will forecast to avoid any smoke from prescribed burning from entering an SSRA in those counties.”

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and partner agencies monitor smoke levels and air quality across the state. DEQ’s Air Quality Index provides current air quality conditions categorized as good, moderate, unhealthy for sensitive groups, unhealthy, very unhealthy and hazardous.

The Oregon Department of Forestry has developed a Statewide Communication Framework for helping Oregonians: (1) understand why we burn, (2) health risks of smoke, (3) ways to avoid smoke, (4) where burning is taking place each day, and (5) where smoke is impacting communities. This communication plan is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Documents/fire/smoke-management-rules-statewide-coms-framework.pdf

Burning for healthier forests

Overcrowded forests are more prone to tree deaths from drought and insects, and typically experience greater fire intensity than woodlands where trees are more widely spaced. Prescribed burns help maintain forest health and reduce the risk of high-intensity, catastrophic wildfires and the large volume of smoke associated with such wildfires.

Yonker says fire suppression actions are more effective and lower in cost in areas with a recent history of controlled burning.

While all fires produce some smoke, the amount from burning covered slash piles is far less than from a wildfire burning an entire stand of trees. Air quality in Oregon during the September mega fires, for example, was the worst the state ever recorded.

“Wildfires often occur when the atmosphere is stable, trapping smoke close to the ground where it’s more likely to impact people,” says Yonker. “So anything we can do to reduce the amount of wildfire smoke, including doing more prescribed burning, is better for people.”

                                                                            # # #

Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual public meeting on Nov. 4 - 10/23/20

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 4. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, this will be a virtual public meeting.

The meeting agenda includes:

  • A landowner appealed their addition to the forest patrol assessment roll and requested a hearing before the Board
  • An update on fire season
  • A presentation on the Board’s statutory authority regarding rulemaking and policymaking for carbon and climate
  • A series of guest presenters will provide information on topics relating to forest carbon accounting framework
  • Information on the urban and community forestry achievements, and forestry research relative to human health and urban livability
  • Information on the Oregon Global Warming Commission Executive Order 20-04

View the agenda for additional topics to be discussed at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

The meeting will be livestreamed and written public comment will be accepted. There is no live testimony for Board decision item one. Written testimony can be submitted before or after the meeting to oardofForestry@oregon.gov">BoardofForestry@oregon.gov. The board packet and livestream option are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.

October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.
October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.
ODF fire report for Monday, Oct. 19, 2020 (Photo) - 10/19/20

SALEM, Ore. - Barring significant new wildfires, this will be the last regularly scheduled ODF fire situation report of this year. October rains have allowed the majority of ODF districts and fire protection associations to end fire season. The national fire preparedness level was lowered to 3 last week. With the Holiday Farm Fire now being managed by a Type 3 team, no ODF Incident Management Teams are currently deployed on wildfires.

Only one wildfire start was reported yesterday in Oregon, with no new acres burned reported.   

Check ODF's online public fire restrictions map to see what if any fire restrictions might still be in force for your area.  

2020 Fire Season On ODF-Protected Lands
This fire season there have been 2,027 fires across all jurisdictions in Oregon and 1,221,324 acres burned. On ODF-protected lands, there have been 912 fires, close to the 10-year average of 918. In the past 10 years the average number of acres burned on lands protected by ODF has been 41,426. More than 13 times that amount - 551,816 acres - has burned this year.  

Closures

Santiam State Forest is still closed to the public. Before heading out to hunt or recreate on other state or federal public lands, please check to see if there are any restrictions or closures due to the recent fires. There are still portions of some highways in wildfire areas that are closed. Use ODOT’s TripCheck to plan your route.

 Fire name

 Acres burned

Containment

 Location

Lionshead

204,469

       46%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

193,556

       72%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,393

       96%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,054

       61%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,542

       95%

20 miles E of Glide

Slater

44,597 in Oregon

       75%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)


More Information

State Forests Advisory Committee meets October 23 via Zoom - 10/16/20

SALEM, Ore. – The State Forests Advisory Committee will meet Friday, October 23 at 9 a.m. via Zoom to discuss wildfire impacts to the Santiam State Forest and state forest management implementation planning in relation to ongoing Habitat Conservation Plan development.

Instructions to view or listen to the meeting will be posted along with the full meeting agenda at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SFAC.aspx. There will be opportunity for public comment at the beginning of the meeting. Anyone wishing to provide public comment is asked to contact ODF Public Affairs Specialist Jason Cox prior to the meeting at .cox@oregon.gov">jason.r.cox@oregon.gov. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7427.

SFAC’s role

The State Forests Advisory Committee (SFAC) includes citizens and representatives of timber, environmental and recreation groups. SFAC provides a forum to discuss issues, opportunities and concerns, and offer advice and guidance to ODF on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan. The plan provides guidance for balanced management of 616,000 acres within the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam State Forests, and several scattered state-owned forest tracts in Benton, Polk, Lincoln and Lane counties that generates revenue while prioritizing environmental and social benefits.

Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meetings on October 16 and December 18 canceled - 10/13/20

SALEM, Ore. — The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee’s scheduled meetings for October 16 and December 18, 2020 have been canceled.

The Northwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee meets Oct. 29 via Zoom - 10/13/20

SALEM, Ore. – The Northwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee will meet virtually Thursday, Oct. 29 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502 or Susan.Dominique@oregon.gov. Topics to be covered include:

  • Private Forests Division update
  • Operator of the Year decision
  • Fire season update
  • Senate Bill 1602
  • Field Support Unit update
  • Monitoring Unit update

There will be an opportunity for public comment near the beginning of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502 or susan.dominique@oregon.gov.

Regional Forest Practices Committees are panels of citizens – mandated under Oregon law – that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practices Committees, serving the Eastern, Northwest and Southwest regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of the committees’ members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.
Oregon’s forests are among the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.

ODF fire situation report for Monday, Oct. 12, 2020 - 10/12/20

SALEM, Ore. -  Just after Labor Day, ODF started tracking 17 major fires. We continue to track 6 of those (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

Recent rains across much of the state have been lowering fire danger levels. As a result, the regional fire preparedness level was lowered to 2 on Saturday. Only one wildfire start was reported yesterday in Oregon, but zero new acres burned were reported. 

Remember that fire season isn’t over yet, which means backyard burning and other restrictions are still in effect on ODF-protected lands. Check the public fire restrictions map to see current restrictions for your area.

 

Fire name

Acres burned

Containment

Location

Lionshead

204,469

       46%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

193,556

       72%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,393

       96%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,054

       61%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,542

       95%

20 miles E of Glide

Slater

44,597 in Oregon

       75%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

 

2020 Fire Season

This fire season, there have been 2,027 fires across all jurisdictions and 1,221,324 acres burned. On ODF-protected lands, there have been 907 fires and 551,816 acres burned.

 

Closures

Santiam State Forest is still closed to the public. Before heading out to hunt or recreate on other state or federal public lands, please check to see if there are any restrictions or closures due to the recent fires. There are still portions of some highways in wildfire areas that are closed. Use ODOT’s TripCheck to plan your route.

More Information

Committee for Family Forestlands meets Oct. 20 via Zoom - 10/08/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually Tuesday, Oct. 20 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The committee’s agenda includes: 

  • Private Forest Division update
  • 2020 fire season
  • After the Fire – salvage and recovery
  • Senate Bill 1602
  • Work Plan Review
  • Committee vacancies
  • Partner update

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

The Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee meets Oct. 22 via Zoom - 10/06/20

SALEM, Ore. – The Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee will meet virtually Thursday, Oct. 22 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502 or Susan.Dominique@oregon.gov. Topics to be covered include:

  • Private Forests Division update
  • Operator of the Year decision
  • Fire season update
  • Senate Bill 1602
  • Field Support Unit update
  • Monitoring Unit update

 

There will be an opportunity for public comment near the beginning of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502 or susan.dominique@oregon.gov.
 

Regional Forest Practices Committees are panels of citizens – mandated under Oregon law – that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practices Committees, serving the Eastern, Northwest and Southwest regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of the committees’ members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.


Oregon’s forests are among the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.

Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee meets Oct. 15 via Zoom - 10/06/20

SALEM, Ore. – The Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee will meet virtually Thursday, Oct. 15 from 8:30 a.m. to noon. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502 or Susan.Dominique@oregon.gov. Topics to be covered include:

  • Private Forests Division update
  • Operator of the Year decision
  • Fire season update
  • Senate Bill 1602
  • Field Support Unit update
  • Monitoring Unit update

 

There will be an opportunity for public comment near the beginning of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502 or susan.dominique@oregon.gov.
 

Regional Forest Practices Committees are panels of citizens – mandated under Oregon law – that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practices Committees, serving the Eastern, Northwest and Southwest regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of the committees’ members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.


Oregon’s forests are among the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.

ODF fire report for Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 - 10/05/20

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely tracking 6 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

Five of the six major fires still on the landscape have burned 100,000 acres or more in Oregon. One of those massive fires, Lionshead, is the sixth largest fire of the past 100 years in Oregon at 204,412 acres. Lionshead is the only one of these major fires that showed any growth in size Sunday – just 27 acres. Most posted double-digit gains in containment over the weekend. Yesterday also saw no new fires reported anywhere in the state.

Remember that fire season isn’t over yet, which means backyard burning and other restrictions are still in effect on ODF-protected lands. Check the public fire restrictions map to see current restrictions for your area.

 

Fire name

Acres burned

Containment

Location

Lionshead

204,412

       47.5%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

193,253

       59%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

       78%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,085

       57%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,542   

       91%

20 miles E of Glide

Slater

44,597 in Oregon

       55%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

 

Closures

Santiam State Forest is still closed to the public. Before heading out to hunt or recreate on other state or federal public lands, please check to see if there are any restrictions or closures due to the recent fires. There are still portions of highways statewide that are closed. Use ODOT’s TripCheck to plan your route.

More information

ODF fire report and fire map for Friday, Oct. 2, 2020 - 10/02/20

SALEM, Ore. - ODF is closely tracking 6 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

Five of the six major fires still on the landscape have burned 100,000 acres or more in Oregon. One of those massive fires, Lionshead, is the sixth largest fire of the past 100 years in Oregon at 204,367 acres.

For fire season 2020, there have been 886 fires on ODF-protected lands that have burned 543,382 acres. Prior to 2020, the fire season of 1933—which included the first Tillamook Burn—was the worst on record for ODF-protected lands, with the loss of approximately 340,000 acres. Across all lands in Oregon, there have been 1,995 fires for 1,045,536 acres burned.

Remember that fire season isn’t over yet, which means backyard burning and other restrictions are still in effect on ODF-protected lands. Check the public fire restrictions map to see current restrictions for your area.

Fire name

Acres burned

Containment

Location

Lionshead

204,355

37%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,848

59%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

70%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,070

45%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,542

79%

20 miles E of Glide

Slater

44,495 in Oregon

50%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

Closures

Santiam State Forest is still closed to the public. Before heading out to hunt or recreate on other state or federal public lands, please check to see if there are any restrictions or closures due to the recent fires. There are still portions of highways statewide that are closed. Use ODOT’s TripCheck to plan your route.

More information

Attached Media Files: Fire map for Friday, Oct. 2, 2020