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Artist Dorothy Haber-Lehigh will lead a sketching workshop for all skill levels at the Tillamook Forest Center on Sunday, April 28.
Artist Dorothy Haber-Lehigh will lead a sketching workshop for all skill levels at the Tillamook Forest Center on Sunday, April 28.
Tillamook Forest Center to host sketching workshop for artists of all skill levels on April 28 (Photo) - 04/18/19

Tillamook, Ore. — “Sketching Wildflowers and Butterflies with Dorota Haber-Lehigh” at the Tillamook Forest Center on April 28 is a great opportunity for visitors to learn how to design, use various techniques, and become educated on native plants and butterflies.

Visitors are invited to join Haber-Lehigh on Sunday, April 28 from 1-3:30 p.m., to explore drawing butterflies and botanicals using creative approaches in their sketchbook. Attendees can investigate butterfly and plant structures and experiment with various techniques using pencil, pens, and colored pencils. They will learn how to design playful and interesting compositions for their sketchbook.

Haber-Lehigh is an educator, artist and a forager from Seaside. Visitors are invited to bring photos and plant specimens to class or use those that are provided. Supplies will be offered, but please feel free to bring your favorite sketchbook or colored pencils.  

Registration is required and the deadline is Wednesday, April 24. This workshop is for ages 12 – adult, space is limited and includes all materials with the $25 reservation fee. To reserve your space or learn more, call 503-815-6800.

To learn more about the workshop, or to explore upcoming naturalist-led programs, check out the program & event calendar at www.tillamookforestcenter.com/calendar.

About the Tillamook Forest Center: Nestled in the heart of the Tillamook State Forest, the Tillamook Forest Center is the region’s largest forest-based interpretive and educational center, located 50 miles west of Portland and 22 miles east of Tillamook on Oregon Highway 6.  It is a special place to develop a deeper connection with Oregon’s forests through experience and exploration. Spring hours for the Center are Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A $5 donation is suggested.

State Forests Advisory Committee to meet April 26 in Salem - 04/17/19

SALEM, Ore. – An Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) state forests advisory group will meet Friday, April 26 in Salem to receive updates on ODF Annual Operations Plan accomplishments and state forest issues, including:

  • Implementation Plan Status – Time/Harvest Volume
  • Annual Operations Plan Guidance Review, Plan Summaries and Public Comment Process
  • Western Oregon Habitat Conservation Plan process and SFAC opportunities for involvement
  • Update on Workforce Futuring (State Forests Organizational Restructuring)
  • Legislative Updates
  • State Forests Division Updates

Opportunity for public comment is also on the agenda and is currently scheduled for 2 p.m. The full agenda is posted at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SFAC.aspx.

Meeting details

The State Forests Advisory Committee will meet at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, April 26, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, Tillamook Room, 2600 State St., Salem 97310.

SFAC’s role

The State Forests Advisory Committee (SFAC) is comprised of citizens and representatives of timber, environmental and recreation groups. SFAC provides a forum to discuss issues, opportunities and concerns, and offer advice and guidance to ODF on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan. The plan provides guidance for managing 616,000 acres within the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam State Forests, and several scattered state-owned forest tracts in Benton, Polk, Lincoln and Lane counties through a balanced approach to generate revenue while prioritizing environmental and social benefits.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-745-7427.

Kyle Abraham has been named to head the Oregon Department of Forestry's Private Forests Division. The Division has a forest health and urban forestry assistance programs and oversees the state's Forest Practices Act.
Kyle Abraham has been named to head the Oregon Department of Forestry's Private Forests Division. The Division has a forest health and urban forestry assistance programs and oversees the state's Forest Practices Act.
Oregon Department of Forestry names Kyle Abraham as chief of the Private Forests Division (Photo) - 04/16/19

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry has named Kyle Abraham to head the agency’s Private Forests Division. Abraham, who grew up in Salem and still lives there, has been the Division’s deputy chief since 2017. He’ll assume his new responsibilities officially when the current chief, Lena Tucker, moves into her new role as Deputy State Forester on July 1.

Abraham will be leading several programs within the Private Forests Division to help protect and maintain Oregon’s forests and the services they provide. The Division is responsible for forest health, urban and community assistance forestry and helping Oregonians follow the Forest Practices Act governing timber harvesting and replanting.

“I’m very excited and humbled to have this opportunity to serve as the Private Forests Division Chief,” Abraham said. 

After graduating from Oregon State University with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in fisheries science, Abraham in 1988 began working with ODF in the field in several capacities. Those experiences included doing electrofishing surveys, evaluating fish passage through culverts, and collecting water samples after aerial herbicide applications. He worked as a Stewardship Forester for several years in ODF’s Santiam, Molalla and the Dallas offices. He also worked in ODF’s Salem headquarters as a monitoring specialist, developing and leading scientific monitoring projects designed to test the effectiveness of Oregon’s Forest Practices Act. 

From 2010-2012, Abraham worked for the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board as their Effectiveness Monitoring Coordinator.  He returned to ODF in late 2012 and began serving as the Water Quality Specialist for the Private Forests Division, leading the agency’s discussions on water quality and forestry interactions. 

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Board of Forestry meets April 24, to hear reports on carbon, marbled murrelet rulemaking, and state forests planning - 04/12/19

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet in Salem on Wednesday, April 24, to receive updates on several continuing topics. Oregon Department of Forestry staff will present the forest ecosystem carbon report, summarizing current board policy and previous work to integrate climate change into the agency’s business. ODF staff will also present for board approval the final technical report for marbled murrelets. The board will also hear updates on the Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan and Forest Management Plan projects. The public meeting is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. and run through approximately 3:30 p.m., followed by a one-hour executive session.

In addition to the staff reports, the Oregon Forest Resources Institute will provide to the board an overview of the 2019 values and beliefs survey. The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee, which advises the board on state forests policy, will provide comments to the board. The public meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem.

Public comment will be accepted on agenda topics, as well as during the start of the meeting for topics not on the agenda. A sign-up sheet will be available for public comment on a first-come, first-served basis. To ensure the Board has the opportunity to conduct all business on the agenda, public testimony will be limited to 30 minutes per agenda item. Written comments may be submitted to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">Boardofforestry@oregon.gov in advance of the meeting.

A livestream option will be available for those who wish to view the meeting remotely. For more details, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Meeting materials are available at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

###

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.

Designing urban areas to be more tree friendly is the topic of this year's urban forestry conference in Portland on June 6.
Designing urban areas to be more tree friendly is the topic of this year's urban forestry conference in Portland on June 6.
Oregon urban forestry conference June 6 will focus on ways cities can make space for trees (Photo) - 04/10/19

PORTLAND, Ore. — How to design tree-friendly infrastructure in urban areas is the focus of the state’s annual urban forestry conference Thursday, June 6 in Portland. The conference is put on by the Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon Community Trees, and the USDA Forest Service’s Urban and Community Forestry. The “Making Space for Trees: Designing Tree-Friendly Infrastructure for Oregon” conference will be held at the World Forestry Center from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Registration is now open through Eventbrite. Discounted early-bird registration is available through April 26. A further discount is also available through that same date for people living and working in a Tree City USA.

Keynote speaker is Howard Stenn, a horticulturalist and landscape designer from the Seattle area. His talk is titled “The Six Critical Requirements for Healthy Urban Trees.” Stenn is a consultant on sustainable landscaping, soil improvement and water conservation. He has trained thousands of landscape professionals, planners, educators and others in conservation strategies.

“We and the other presenters and sponsors are delighted to bring Stenn to Portland because minimizing conflicts between trees and the built environment of cities is such a critical and continuing issue for urban forestry nationally,” said Samantha Wolf, president of Oregon Community Trees. The non-profit organization assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry.

Kristin Ramstad is with the Oregon Department of Forestry, which co-sponsors the event.  Ramstad, who is manager of ODF’s Urban and Community Assistance Forestry program, said, “Everyone interested in trees having enough room to grow and flourish in urban places should attend. Our other speakers will discuss tree selection and maintenance practices that can significantly improve tree health while maintaining infrastructure integrity.”

Registered attendees will also have an option to go on a guided urban tree walk the day before the conference to view street trees in different density neighborhoods in southwest Portland. There is also a pre-conference social event later that same evening.

The conference raises funds for urban forestry education and outreach in Tree City USA communities. For example, money from the conference supports grants to help communities engage the public in celebrating Arbor Day.

To date, event sponsors include:

  • Allegiant Partners, Inc.
  • Bartlett Tree Experts
  • Clean Water Services
  • Davey
  • Double Mountain Brewing
  • Friends of Trees
  • J. Frank Schmidt & Son
  • Morgan Holen and Associates
  • Oregon State University
  • Oregon Trail Electric Co-op
  • RDO Equipment
  • Scribe-X
  • Teregan and Associates
  • Treecology, Inc.
  • World Forestry Center

Committee for Family Forestlands meets April 18 in Salem - 04/09/19

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Thursday, April 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Salem. The meeting will be in the Santiam Room of Building D on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street.  Among updates the committee will receive are ones about:

  • Siskiyou Streamside Protection Review
  • Emerald Ash Borer Response Plan
  • Compliance Audit
  • Legislative Bills
  • Annual Report planning

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.  

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

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Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee meets April 12 at ODF headquarters in Salem - 04/05/19

SALEM, Ore – The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee will meet Friday, April 12 at 9:30 a.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry Salem headquarters, Tillamook Room, Building C, 2600 State St. Items on the committee’s agenda include comments from State Forester Peter Daugherty as well as the following topics:

  • Carbon Accounting Reports
  • Western Oregon Habitat Conservation Plan: Process and timelines
  • Northwest State Forests Management Plan: Process and timelines

The meeting agenda and materials will be posted on the department’s web site at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

This meeting is open to the public. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

April 12: Help shape the future of state forest management in Oregon - 04/05/19

SALEM, Ore. - A roundtable discussion on the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan and Habitat Conservation Plan processes will take place Friday, April 12 in Salem.

This is an opportunity to provide input and learn about proposed changes to how the state manages some 667,000 acres of state-owned forestland west of the Cascade Mountains. This meeting will primarily focus on processes and timelines for both the Forest Management Plan revision and the Western Oregon Habitat Conservation Plan exploration.

The roundtable will be at 1 p.m. in the Tillamook Room at the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State St., Salem 97310.

State Forests are managed under the Greatest Permanent Value rule. Based in state law, Greatest Permanent Value requires ODF to manage state forests to provide a full range of social, economic and environmental benefits. This includes:

  • Vital support for local services like education, law enforcement and health care
  • Jobs, wood products and support for rural economies;
  • Preserving and improving habitat, and providing clean air and water
  • Natural beauty, recreation opportunities and an enormous natural classroom for outdoor education and interpretation.

To learn more about the Forest Management Plan revision and Habitat Conservation Plan process, please visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/Initiatives.aspx.

This meeting is open to the public. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.

La Grande Urban Forester Teresa Gustafson has been named Vice President of the statewide non-profit Oregon Community Trees.
La Grande Urban Forester Teresa Gustafson has been named Vice President of the statewide non-profit Oregon Community Trees.
La Grande resident is named vice president of Oregon Community Trees (Photo) - 04/04/19

LA GRANDE, Ore. — Teresa Gustafson, Urban Forester for the City of La Grande, has been elected vice president of the non-profit Oregon Community Trees. Samantha Wolf of Oregon City has been elected president of the board of Oregon Community Trees for 2019-20. She replaces Eric DeBord of Eugene who completed his presidential term at the end of February.

“I'm excited about our organization's mission and upcoming programs,” said Gustafson. “We co-sponsor the state's largest urban forestry conference each year with the Oregon Department of Forestry. The conference is June 6 and speakers will discuss how cities and towns can ensure adequate room for trees.”

Gustafson said the organization is looking to do even more education about tree selection, tree care and establishing or strengthening resilient urban forest programs around the state. "Beginning this year, Oregon Community Trees increased the number of grants supporting community Arbor Day celebrations, for example. This helps to facilitate and enrich the experience for communities across the state, including eastern Oregon."

About Oregon Community Trees

The mission of Oregon Community Trees is to promote healthy urban and community forests through leadership, education, awareness and advocacy.  Its members include arborists, urban planners, community activists, foresters and employees of the nursery industry. OCT has no paid staff and relies on the commitment of its members, the cooperation of their employers, and the generosity of donors to accomplish its mission.  The organization assists community groups, local governments and schools with expertise and resources as available.

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 Marcus Kauffman, a biomass resource specialist with the Oregon Department of Forestry, will share stories of the people, policies, and potential of using biomass from Oregonís forests in a talk at the Tillamook Forest Center on Saturday, April 20.
Marcus Kauffman, a biomass resource specialist with the Oregon Department of Forestry, will share stories of the people, policies, and potential of using biomass from Oregonís forests in a talk at the Tillamook Forest Center on Saturday, April 20.
Tillamook Forest Center welcomes 'Fresh Brewed Forestry' presentation on biomass on Saturday, April 20 (Photo) - 04/04/19

Tillamook, Ore. — The Tillamook Forest Center is hosting a discussion on the potential of Oregon forest biomass in a carbon-constrained world on Saturday, April 20.  

The event kicks off at 11 a.m. with speaker Marcus Kauffman, a biomass resource specialist with the Oregon Department of Forestry. Kauffman will share stories of the people, policies, and potential of using biomass from Oregon’s forests. From jet fuel made with wood, to heating whole communities with wood, to lowering the carbon footprint of coal, biomass has a role to play. 

“Fresh Brewed Forestry” is a special guest presenter series featuring Oregon Department of Forestry scientists who will give a behind-the-scenes look at how ODF manages forests for Oregonians. To explore upcoming naturalist-led programs, check out the program & event calendar at http://www.tillamookforestcenter.com/events.html.

About the Tillamook Forest Center: Nestled in the heart of the Tillamook State Forest, the Tillamook Forest Center is the region’s largest forest-based interpretative and educational center, located 50 miles west of Portland and 22 miles east of Tillamook on Oregon Highway 6.  It is a special place to develop a deeper connection with Oregon’s forests through experience and exploration. Spring hours for the Center are Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A $5 donation is suggested.

Samantha Wolf (right) of Oregon City has become president of the non-profit Oregon Community Trees, succeeding outgoing president Eric DeBord of Eugene (left).
Samantha Wolf (right) of Oregon City has become president of the non-profit Oregon Community Trees, succeeding outgoing president Eric DeBord of Eugene (left).
Oregon Community Trees names Clackamas County resident as its new board president (Photo) - 04/04/19

OREGON CITY, Ore. — Samantha Wolf of Oregon City has been elected president of the board of Oregon Community Trees for 2019-20. She replaces Eric DeBord of Eugene who completed his presidential term at the end of February.

Wolf has coordinated Clackamas County’s Dump Stoppers program since 2017. Other projects include Clackamas County’s Urban Lumber Project (2016) and Cross-Laminated Timber County Courthouse Design Project (2019). Before joining OCT, Wolf studied Forest Ecology and Climate Change Impacts at the University of Michigan.

“We have some exciting programs coming up,” said Wolf. “The annual urban forestry conference we co-sponsor with Oregon Department of Forestry is June 6 in Portland. It’s the largest such conference in the state. Speakers will focus on how cities and towns can ensure adequate space is available for trees.”

Wolf said she hopes to expand educational opportunities for Urban Foresters across the state through pruning and street-tree selection and installation workshops. Other educational opportunities can stem from our own OCT Directors with a wide range of knowledge on urban forestry issues related to run-off and erosion problems, improving the resiliency of an existing urban forest, and even help to initiate a new urban forest program in communities that do not have them. Starting this year, OCT has increased the number of grants supporting community Arbor Day celebrations, helping to facilitate and enrich the experience for communities across the state.

Teresa Gustafson, Tree Care Educator for the City of La Grande, was elected vice president of the organization.

About Oregon Community Trees

The mission of Oregon Community Trees is to promote healthy urban and community forests through leadership, education, awareness and advocacy.  Its members include arborists, urban planners, community activists, foresters and employees of the nursery industry. OCT has no paid staff and relies on the commitment of its members, the cooperation of their employers, and the generosity of donors to accomplish its mission.  The organization assists community groups, local governments and schools with expertise and resources as available.

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Red-flowering horse chestnut is the official city tree of Echo, designated after a campaign by Diane Berry and schoolchildren.
Red-flowering horse chestnut is the official city tree of Echo, designated after a campaign by Diane Berry and schoolchildren.
Eastern Oregon woman receives statewide recognition for decades of work creating a diverse urban forest in Echo (Photo) - 04/02/19

ECHO, Ore. — Small towns can have a big urban forest through efforts of people like Diane Berry, who is being honored this month by the Oregon Department of Forestry, in partnership with the non-profit group Oregon Community Trees (OCT). Berry is receiving OCT’s President’s Award for her advocacy for developing a diverse urban forest in Echo in Umatilla County.

Berry, who is Echo’s city administrator, has worked for over 20 years on many projects to add trees to the town and educate the public about their importance. Her work has led to Echo receiving many grants for placing trees and tree-related art in public spaces.

OCT President Samantha Wolf says it was easy selecting Berry for the special recognition. “Berry has worked tirelessly to transform this small town at the eastern edge of the Columbia Plateau through trees,” said Wolf. “The town mostly had only Russian olive and black locust trees when she started.”

Today, the town’s treescape is surprisingly diverse for its size and the climate, and it boasts a well-stocked arboretum.

Wolf said Berry’s efforts demonstrate that even a place with fewer than a thousand residents can be a model Tree City USA.

Berry is also one of four recipients of this year’s Oregon Urban and Community Forestry Award. The others are:

  • Kerry Rappold, Natural Resources Program manager for the City of Wilsonville
  • Chris John of Canopy LLC The Care of Trees in Ashland
  • Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association

Berry’s initiatives were recognized in 2003 when Echo was named Oregon Tree City of the Year, in part when it designated the red-flowering horse chestnut as the town’s official tree. Berry worked with the city’s students to educate them about trees, their urban forest, and Tree City USA. The students then took an active in the campaign to select an official tree.

The Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association (WVPPCA) has aided cities interested in planting the native subspecies of ponderosa pine by publishing the Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Management Guide. In the 1990s the group was instrumental in collecting genetic material from most of the remaining valley ponderosa pine stands. Several of those stands have since been lost to development. Seedlings grown from seed collected by the WVPPCA were planted at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s seed nursery in St. Paul, Oregon. The grove at St. Paul forms the most complete collection of genes of the Willamette Valley subspecies of ponderosa pine in the world. 

Kerry Rappold was instrumental in starting the Wilsonville’s “Bees Stewardship” program,making the city's urban forest more friendly to pollinators. The “Bee Stewards” program has earned Wilsonville a Bee City USA designation. Rappold has also worked to create passages for wildlife during road construction in the city.

Ashland Tree Commission Chair Chris John works hard to preserve urban trees and educate the public about their importance. He and his company – Canopy LLC The Care of Trees – frequently educate clients about the value of retaining trees versus simply removing them at the first sign of trouble.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. The organization assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry. Each year the organization recognizes individuals and organizations for inspiring tree planting and care, engaging citizens, and raising awareness about urban trees and forests and the need to protect them.

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Ashland's trees have a friend in the city's Tree Commission Chair Chris John, who has educated residents on the value of preserving trees where possible.
Ashland's trees have a friend in the city's Tree Commission Chair Chris John, who has educated residents on the value of preserving trees where possible.
Chris John of Ashland receives statewide recognition for his efforts to preserve urban trees (Photo) - 04/02/19

ASHLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry, in partnership with the non-profit group Oregon Community Trees, is recognizing Chris John of Canopy LLC The Care of Trees in Ashland, for his contributions to educate and encourage the community to value trees. During the Ashland festival of lights, John and his company donated 300 native conifers, giving them away to Ashland residents who promised to plant them.

John is one of four recipients of this year’s Oregon Urban and Community Forestry Award. The others are:

  • Diane Berry, city administrator of Echo, who also received the President’s Award from Oregon Community Trees
  • Kerry Rappold, Natural Resources Program manager for the City of Wilsonville
  • Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association

Chris John chairs Ashland's Tree Commission, where he works hard to preserve urban trees and educate the public about the importance of trees. He and his company frequently educate clients about the value of retaining trees versus simply removing them at the first sign of trouble.

Other honorees

The Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association (WVPPCA) has aided cities interested in planting the native subspecies of ponderosa pine by publishing the Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Management Guide. In the 1990s the group was instrumental in collecting genetic material from most of the remaining valley ponderosa pine stands. Several of those stands have since been lost to development. Seedlings grown from seed collected by the WVPPCA were planted at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s seed nursery in St. Paul, Oregon. The grove is the most complete collection of genes of the Willamette Valley subspecies of ponderosa pine in the world.

Diane Berry has devoted decades to the education and development of urban forestry in Echo. She was instrumental in helping create an arboretum in the city. She also worked with schoolchildren to designate the red-flowering horse chestnut as Echo’s official city tree.

Kerry Rappold plays a significant role in managing Wilsonville’s urban forests by protecting upland wildlife habitat and riparian area. He also helps create sustainable habitat for pollinators and more bee-friendly management policies, which has earned Wilsonville a Bee City USA designation. He has also created passages for wildlife during road construction in Wilsonville.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. The organization assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry. Each year the organization recognizes individuals and organizations for inspiring tree planting and care, engaging citizens, and raising awareness about urban trees and forests and the need to protect them.

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Pollinators like this bumblee busy in the flowers of a linden tree have a friend in Kerry Rappold. The Natural Resources Program Manager for the City of Wilsonville, Rappold is being honored this month by Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Community
Pollinators like this bumblee busy in the flowers of a linden tree have a friend in Kerry Rappold. The Natural Resources Program Manager for the City of Wilsonville, Rappold is being honored this month by Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Community
Kerry Rappold of Wilsonville receives statewide recognition for helping bees in the urban forest (Photo) - 04/02/19

WILSONVILLE, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry, in partnership with the non-profit group Oregon Community Trees, is recognizing Kerry Rappold of Wilsonville for his leadership and accomplishments in advancing urban and community forestry. Rappold is the Natural Resources Porgram Manager for the City of Wilsonville. He was instrumental in starting Wilsonville’s “Bee Stewards” program focused on improving pollinator habitat, decreasing municipal pesticide use and educating the public on pollinator environmental needs.

The Association is one of four recipients of this year’s Oregon Urban and Community Forestry Award. The others are:

  • Diane Berry of the City of Echo, who also received the President’s Award from Oregon Community Trees
  • Chris John of Canopy LLC The Care of Trees in Ashland
  • Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association

The “Bee Stewards” program has earned Wilsonville Bee City USA designation for its commitment to raising awareness of the role pollinators’ play in the community and for creating sustainable pollinator habitats. Rappold plays a significant role in managing the City’s urban forests by protecting upland wildlife habitat and riparian areas. He does this through administering the City’s Significant Resource Overlay Zone. He also created passages for wildlife during road construction in Wilsonville.

Other honorees

The Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association (WVPPCA) has aided cities interested in planting the native subspecies of ponderosa pine by publishing the Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Management Guide. In the 1990s the group was instrumental in collecting genetic material from most of the remaining valley ponderosa pine stands. Several of those stands have since been lost to development. Seedlings grown from seed collected by the WVPPCA were planted at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s seed nursery in St. Paul, Oregon.  The grove at St. Paul forms the most complete collection of genes of the Willamette Valley subspecies of ponderosa pine in the world. 

Diane Berry has devoted decades to helping create an urban forest in Echo with many kinds of trees. She was instrumental in helping create an arboretum in the city. In addition, Berry worked with local schoolchildren to designate the red-flowering horse chestnut as Echo’s official city tree.

Ashland Tree Commission Chair Chris John has worked on behalf of the city's urban forest. His education efforts with residents have helped preserve hundreds of local trees.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. The organization assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry. Each year the organization recognizes individuals and organizations for inspiring tree planting and care, engaging citizens, and raising awareness about urban trees and forests and the need to protect them.

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ODF Seed Orchard Manager Mike Kroon (left) and Kristin Ramstad with ODF's Urband and Community Forestry Assistance Program at the world's most complete genetic collection of Willamette Valley ponderosa pine in St. Paul, Oregon. The group that gathered see
ODF Seed Orchard Manager Mike Kroon (left) and Kristin Ramstad with ODF's Urband and Community Forestry Assistance Program at the world's most complete genetic collection of Willamette Valley ponderosa pine in St. Paul, Oregon. The group that gathered see
Group dedicated to saving the Willamette Valley's native ponderosa pine receives statewide recognition (Photo) - 04/02/19

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry, in partnership with the non-profit group Oregon Community Trees, is recognizing the Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association for advocating, educating, and developing reforestation plans to ensure the long-term survival of the ponderosa pine subspecies native to the Willamette Valley.

The Association is one of four recipients of this year’s Oregon Urban and Community Forestry Award. The others are:

  • Kerry Rappold, Natural Resources Program manager from the City of Wilsonville
  • Chris John of Canopy LLC The Care of Trees in Ashland
  • Diane Berry, city administrator for the City of Echo, who also received the President’s Award from Oregon Community Trees

The Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association’s vision is to conserve the valley ponderosa pine’s gene pool as the basis for supply superior pine seedlings. To that end, in the 1990s the group gathered genetic material from high quality trees in most of the remaining ponderosa pine stands throughout the Willamette Valley.  The Association has also served as a hub for sharing information on Willamette Valley pine. Many of the trees were felled by settlers in the 19th century as the most ready source of lumber for houses, barns and fences. Farming further reduced the pine population, which in recent decades has declined due to suburban development and land clearing.

In 1996 and 1999, the pine seeds collected by the Association were planted in ODF’s seed orchard near St Paul. Today, the orchard has living trees or stored seed from 162 different populations of Willamette Valley pine. That represents the most complete genetic collection of the subspecies anywhere in the world.

Seed has been collected at the orchard since 2003 and distributed to interested landowners. The Association has aided urban foresters interested in planting native ponderosa pine in cities by publishing the Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Management Guide.

Other honorees

Diane Berry has devoted decades to helping create an urban forest in Echo with many kinds of trees. She also built support for establishing an arboretum in the town, which sits on the eastern edge of the Columbia Plateau. In addition, Berry worked with local students to designate the red-flowering horse chestnut as Echo's official city tree.

Kerry Rappold was instrumental in starting Wilsonville’s “Bees Stewardship” program. The program is focused on improving pollinator habitat, decreasing municipal pesticide use and educating the public on pollinator environmental needs. He's also been mindful of the city’s urban forest in other ways, such as providing for wildlife corridors during road construction.

Ashland Tree Commission Chair Chris John is recognized for his efforts on behalf of Ashland’s urban forest. He has worked to educate the community to preserve hundreds of trees locally.

Oregon Community Trees promotes healthy urban and community forests. The organization assists community groups, local governments and schools throughout the state with expertise and grants that support leadership, education, awareness and advocacy for urban and community forestry. Each year the organization recognizes individuals and organizations for inspiring tree planting and care, engaging citizens, and raising awareness about urban trees and forests and the need to protect them.

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