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News Releases
D River Beach health advisory issued August 20 - 08/20/19

D River Beach health advisory issued August 20

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

 

 

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force meets August 27 - 08/19/19

August 19, 2019

Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force.

When: Tuesday, August 27, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Agenda: Welcome, task force purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the task force, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary.

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/SUBSTANCEUSE/OPIOIDS/Pages/task-force.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Hfha9f

 

OHA gathers subcommittees to address socially focused priorities of State Health Improvement Plan - 08/19/19

August 19, 2019

Members will develop, track strategies aimed at ending health disparities

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority has gathered teams of community partners to begin tackling State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) priorities focused on social factors that affect health, such as childhood trauma, food security, and access to health care and employment.

The PartnerSHIP, a steering committee developing the 2020-2024 SHIP, has formed subcommittees with representatives from state agencies, nonprofits, tribal health, local public health departments, health care, academia, businesses, and people with lived experience.

The subcommittees’ goal is to identify and track strategies aimed at achieving the five SHIP priorities that include:

  • Institutional bias, or systematic distribution of resources, power and opportunity in society to the exclusion of people of color, people with disabilities, people with low income and people who identify as LGBTQ+.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress, which can include abuse and neglect, living in poverty, incarceration, family separation, and exposure to racism and discrimination.
  • Economic drivers of health such as housing, living wage, food insecurity and transportation, since poverty is a strong predictor of poor health.
  • Access to equitable preventive health care, which can be limited by health care provider shortages, transportation barriers, health care costs, or language or other cultural barriers.
  • Behavioral health including poor mental health and substance use, which can lead to lower quality of life, unemployment and increased suicide rates.

"Convening these subcommittees is a significant step toward systematically addressing the 2020-2024 SHIP priorities," said Oregon Public Health Director Lillian Shirley. "This provides an exciting opportunity to work with partners to develop strategies for reducing inequities that can have lifelong health effects."

Subcommittee rosters can be viewed by clicking on the 2020-2024 SHIP Priority Area links on the OHA State Health Improvement Plan webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/ship-process.aspx.

The subcommittees will align existing assets and strengths and identity new strategies needed to end health disparities, the disproportionate burden of preventable illness, injury, disability, or mortality experienced by marginalized groups in each priority area. The strategies will be developed using a health equity framework, which aims to eliminate disparities by addressing social, economic and environmental conditions that affect health, and will include policy changes, improvements in daily living conditions, and individual-level interventions.

Strategies will be created with particular attention to the needs of priority populations including people of color, people with disabilities, people who are low-income, people who identify as LGBTQ+, older adults and children. Subcommittees will also identify measures that will be used to monitor progress over the next five years of plan implementation.

The 2020-2024 SHIP is a product of the state’s effort to build a modern public health system. The plan’s focus on social factors affecting health was informed by community partners. Next spring, communities will be asked to weigh in on the proposed strategies to ensure they are culturally relevant to priority populations.

Subcommittees will meet monthly starting in August. All meetings are open to the public. Meeting details for each subcommittee, and additional information about the SHIP, can be found at healthoregon.org/2020ship. For questions or comments, contact at isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us.

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OHA reúne a subcomités para enfocarse en las prioridades sociales del Plan Estatal de Mejoramiento de Salud - 08/19/19

19 de agosto, 2019

OHA reúne a subcomités para enfocarse en las prioridades sociales del Plan Estatal de Mejoramiento de Salud

Miembros desarrollarán y harán seguimiento a estrategias cuya meta es acabar con las disparidades de salud

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA, por sus siglas en inglés) ha reunido equipos de socios comunitarios para comenzar a abordar las prioridades del Plan Estatal de Mejoramiento de Salud (State Health Improvement Plan o SHIP). Las prioridades se enfocan en los factores sociales que afectan la salud, como el trauma de la infancia, inseguridad alimentaria, y acceso a servicios de salud y empleo.

El comité directivo, conocido como PartnerSHIP, desarrolló el SHIP de 2020-2024 y formó subcomités con representantes provenientes de agencias estatales, organizaciones sin ánimo de lucro, servicios de salud para indígenas americanos, departamentos de salud pública locales, servicios de atención a la salud, ámbito académico, negocios y personas con experiencia propia.

La meta de los subcomités es identificar y hacer seguimiento a las estrategias para abordar las cinco prioridades de SHIP, que incluyen:

  • Racismo institucional, o distribución sistemática de recursos, poder y oportunidad en la sociedad que resulta en la exclusión de personas de color, personas con discapacidades, personas con bajos ingresos y personas que se identifican como LGBTQ+.
  • Adversidad, trauma y estrés tóxico, lo cual puede incluir abuso y negligencia, vivir en la pobreza, encarcelamiento, separación de familias, y el ser expuesto al racismo y la discriminación.
  • Impulsores económicos de la salud, tales como son la vivienda, salario digno, inseguridad alimentaria y transporte, ya que la pobreza es un factor de predicción potente de mala salud.
  • Acceso a servicios de salud preventivos equitativos, que pueden ser limitados por escasez de proveedores de salud, barreras en el transporte, costos del cuidado de salud, o barreras de lenguaje o culturales.
  • Salud de comportamiento, incluyendo mala salud mental y abuso de sustancias, lo que puede conducir a una calidad de vida baja, desempleo y un aumento en la tasa de suicidios.

"La convocación de estos subcomités es un paso importante para abordar las prioridades de SHIP de 2020-2024", dice la Directora de Salud Pública de Oregon Lillian Shirley. "Esto nos da una oportunidad para trabajar con nuestros socios y desarrollar estrategias para reducir inequidades que pueden afectar a la salud de por vida".

Listas de los integrantes y otros datos de los subcomités pueden ser ubicados al oprimir el enlace "2020-2024 SHIP Priority Area" en https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/ship-process.aspx.

Los subcomités buscan alinear recursos y puntos fuertes para identificar estrategias necesarias para acabar con las disparidades en la salud, la carga desproporcionada de enfermedades prevenibles, lesiones, discapacidad, o mortalidad experimentada por grupos marginados en cada área de prioridad. Las estrategias serán desarrolladas usando un marco de equidad en la salud, cuyo enfoque es eliminar las disparidades al abordar condiciones sociales, económicas y ambientales que afectan la salud, y las cuales incluirán cambios de política, mejoras en la vida diaria, e intervenciones a nivel individual.

Estrategias serán creadas con atención particular a las necesidades de las poblaciones de prioridad, incluyendo personas de color, personas con discapacidades, personas con bajos ingresos, personas que se identifican como LGBTQ+, ancianos y niños. Los subcomités también identificaran las medidas que serán utilizadas para monitorear el progreso en cinco años después de que el plan sea implementado.

El SHIP de 2020-2024 es producto de los esfuerzos del estado para construir un sistema de salud pública moderno. El enfoque del plan en factores sociales que afectan la salud fue concebido con la ayuda de socios comunitarios. La próxima primavera, se les pedirá a las comunidades que opinen sobre las estrategias propuestas para asegurar que son culturalmente relevantes para las poblaciones de prioridad.

Los subcomités se reunirán mensualmente comenzando en agosto. Todas las reuniones están abiertas al público. Detalles de las reuniones para cada subcomité y datos adicionales sobre SHIP, pueden ser encontrados en healthoregon.org/2020ship. Si tiene preguntas o comentarios, diríjalas a isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us.

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http://bit.ly/30javlZ

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets August 22 - 08/16/19

August 16, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Review and discuss community survey results and distribution process; discuss and group strategies and activities to further goals; discuss and decide on decision making process.

When: August 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/308Mgad

First meetings for 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees set in August, September - 08/16/19

August 16, 2019

What: The first meeting of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) subcommittees, tasked with identifying strategies and measures, and developing work plans for implementing the SHIP. Each of the subcommittees is focused on one of the five SHIP priority areas:

Agenda: Become oriented with members of the identified SHIP subcommittee; set the stage for the subcommittee work; develop a shared understanding of priority and communities of concern; and define the goal of the subcommittee work.

Where: All meetings are held on the ninth floor of the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Meetings also are available remotely. Visit the subcommittee meeting page for remote meeting attendance options.

Join the meetings via conference call:

Dial: 877?848?7030

Access code: 2030826#

When:

  • Behavioral Health Subcommittee: Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Access to Equitable Preventive Health Care Subcommittee: Monday, Aug. 26, 1-3 p.m., Room 918.
  • Adversity, Trauma and Toxic Stress Subcommittee: Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Institutional Bias Subcommittee: Wednesday, Sept. 18, 10 a.m. to noon, Room 915.
  • Economic Drivers of Health Subcommittee: Friday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m., Room 900.

All meetings are open to the public. A public comment period will be held during the last 10 minutes of each meeting; comments are limited to three minutes.

Background: Oregon’s SHIP identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The plan serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath of people in Oregon. The SHIP is based off findings of the State Health Assessment.

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2H8qw6U

 

Odell Lake Recreational use health advisory lifted August 14 - 08/14/19

August 14, 2019

Media Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Odell Lake Recreational use health advisory lifted August 14

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Odell Lake in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Odell Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Cambio a la regla federal de 'carga pública' afectará al acceso de servicios de salud en Oregón - 08/13/19

PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

13 de agosto, 2019

Contacto para medios: obb.cowie@dhsoha.state.or.us">Robb Cowie, 503-421-7684; nandez@dhsoha.state.or.us">Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179

Cambio a la regla federal de ‘carga pública’ afectará al acceso de servicios de salud en Oregón

Salem, OR. – La administración de Trump anunció ayer una nueva regla que puede hacer más difícil que inmigrantes que reciben o en el futuro reciban ciertos beneficios de programas del gobierno obtengan un estatus permanente legal si se determina que son ‘carga pública’. Bajo la nueva regla de carga pública, se expande la lista de beneficios que el gobierno federal puede considerar para determinar si un individuo es considerado ‘carga pública’. Estos beneficios que serían considerados no solo incluyen programas de asistencia monetaria (incluyendo Seguridad de Ingreso Suplementario y Asistencia Temporaria para Familias Necesitadas) y atención médica de largo plazo financiada por Medicaid; sino también la asistencia alimenticia, asistencia para la vivienda y varios otros tipos de Medicaid para adultos. Sin embargo, la regla excluye algunas categorías de elegibilidad de Medicaid y participación en otros programas de salud. Oregon Health Authority (OHA, por sus siglas en inglés) es la agencia estatal responsable de proteger la salud de todos los 4 millones de habitantes en Oregon.

Como parte de nuestro compromiso, queremos informar a los residentes del estado sobre como esta regla afectará los programas que proveen cobertura de salud y otros beneficios relacionados a la salud en Oregon. Bajo el nuevo reglamento:

  • Inmigrantes adultos que reciben algunas formas de cobertura de Medicaid (Oregon Health Plan, OHP), su inscripción (entre otros factores) será considerada por el gobierno federal y podrá determinar si son (o se convertirían) en carga pública. Si un inmigrante es considerado una carga pública, a él o ella se le puede negar la residencia permanente legal.
  • La regla de carga pública no aplica a algunos programas federales y estatales, tal como:
    • Medicaid para niños menores de 21, mujeres embarazadas y mujeres hasta 60 días después del parto.
    • Medicaid de emergencia (CAWEM).
    • El Programa de Seguro de Salud para Niños (CHIP).
    • El Programa de Nutrición Suplemental Especial para Mujeres, Bebés y Niños, mejor conocido como WIC.
    • Servicios de educación especial cubiertos por Medicaid y pagados por el Acta de Individuos con Discapacidades (IDEA).
    • Subsidios de primas de seguro médico comercial ofrecido por el Mercado de Seguro de Salud de Oregon.
    • Servicios de salud proveídos por los Centros de Salud basados en las escuelas.
    • Cover All Kids de Oregon.
    • La mayoría de los servicios proveídos por el Programa de Salud Reproductiva de Oregon.

En comentarios que Oregon Health Authority entrego al gobierno federal sobre la regla propuesta el pasado diciembre de 2018, la agencia dio a conocer lo siguiente:

Nosotros sabemos que la cobertura de salud contribuye a embarazos, nacimientos y niños más saludables. Cuando personas cuentan con cobertura de salud, ellos pueden trabajar mejor, asistir a la escuela y contribuir de otras maneras a su economía local. Empleadores se ven beneficiados por una fuerza laboral más saludable, costos de seguro médico más bajos y ha menos ausencias. Cuando las personas cuentan con cobertura de salud hay menos visitas a salas de urgencias y hospitalizaciones, al igual que una carga menor del cuidado no renumerado. A la larga, menos personas se ven con la necesidad de usar servicios sociales y recurrir a programas de protección social. Cuando las personas cuentan con cobertura de salud son más saludables, en promedio, que personas que carecen de cobertura de salud, y comunidades también son más saludables …

El cuidado de salud no es un beneficio de asistencia monetario. La buena salud es para personas, familias y comunidades que prosperan y son económicamente independientes. Esta propuesta castiga a inmigrantes por tomar responsabilidad de su salud, la salud de sus seres queridos y de sus vecinos al buscar servicios de salud. No reconoce que una creciente mayoría de estados (como Oregón) donde se ha expandido Medicaid, un alto porcentaje de beneficiarios de Medicaid, ganan un sueldo y se mantienen a si mismos sin asistencia pública. La propuesta estigmatiza a Medicaid y CHIP como programas de asistencia pública, en lugar de promoverlos como pilares de un sistema de cuidado de salud potente.

Como resultado, esta propuesta se encuentra directamente en conflicto con la misión de nuestra agencia que es ayudar a personas y comunidades a lograr un bienestar físico, mental y social óptimo y mejorar el acceso a cuidado de salud de calidad y accesible.

La nueva regla será publicada en el Registro Federal el 12 de agosto y tomará vigencia el 15 de octubre de 2019. La regla no tiene un efecto retroactivo. Es decir, que ninguno de los cambios incluidos en la nueva regla será aplicados para aquellos individuos y familias que hayan recibido beneficios de algún programa del gobierno previo al 15 de octubre de 2019.

Oregon Health Authority invita a cualquier persona que tenga preguntas sobre como la regla federal de carga pública lo afectará o a miembros de su familia que busque asesoría legal de un abogado de inmigración calificado. Puede encontrar una lista de abogados aquí: https://oregonimmigrationresource.org/.

 

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Impact of federal 'public charge' rule change on access to health care in Oregon - 08/13/19

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 13, 2019

Media contacts: Robb Cowie, 503-421-7684, obb.cowie@state.or.us">robb.cowie@state.or.us; Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, nandez@state.or.us">delia.hernandez@state.or.us

Impact of federal 'public charge' rule change on access to health care in Oregon

SALEM, Ore. — On Monday the Trump administration announced a new rule that could make it harder for some immigrants who rely on certain government benefit programs to obtain lawful permanent residency if they are found to be a "public charge." The new public charge rule expands the list of benefits that the federal government would consider to determine whether an individual is considered a public charge. Benefits that would be considered not only include cash-assistance programs (including Supplemental Security Income and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and Medicaid-funded long-term care, but also nutrition assistance, housing assistance, and many other types of Medicaid for adults. However, the rule does exempt some categories of Medicaid eligibility and participation in other health programs. The Oregon Health Authority is the state agency responsible for protecting the health of all 4 million people living in Oregon. As part of our role, we want to inform state residents about the impact of the rule on programs that provide health coverage and health-related benefits in Oregon. Under the new rule:

  • Immigrant adults who receive some forms of Medicaid coverage would have their enrollment considered (among other factors) by the federal government to determine whether they are (or might become) a public charge. If an immigrant is deemed a public charge, he or she could be denied lawful permanent residency.
  • The public charge rule does not apply to some federal and state programs such as:
    • Medicaid for children under 21 and pregnant women (including 60 days postpartum).
    • Emergency Medicaid (CAWEM).
    • The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).
    • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental nutrition program.
    • Medicaid-covered special education services funded by the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA).
    • Commercial health insurance premium subsidies offered through Oregon’s Health Insurance Marketplace.
    • School-based health services.
    • Oregon’s Cover All Kids Program.
    • Most services offered by Oregon’s Reproductive Health Program.

In the comments the Oregon Health Authority submitted to the federal government on the proposed rule in December 2018, the agency wrote:

We know that health coverage contributes to healthier pregnancies, births, and childhood outcomes. When people have health coverage, they are better able to work, go to school and contribute in other ways to their local economy. Employers benefit from a healthier workforce, insurance costs are lower, and there is less absenteeism. When people have health coverage there are reduced emergency department visits and hospitalizations as well as reduced uncompensated care. Ultimately fewer people turn to social services and draw on the safety net. When people have health coverage, they are healthier, on average, than people who lack health coverage, and communities are healthier too …

Health care is not a cash assistance benefit. Good health is the foundation for thriving, economically independent people, families and communities. This proposal punishes immigrants for taking responsibility for their health, the health of their loved ones and their neighbors by seeking health care. It fails to acknowledge that in a growing majority of states (like Oregon), which have expanded Medicaid, a high percentage of Medicaid members work, earn income and support themselves without public assistance. It stigmatizes Medicaid and CHIP as public assistance programs, instead of promoting them of as a vital cornerstone of a strong health care system.

As a result, this proposal is in direct conflict with our agency’s mission which is to help people and communities achieve optimum physical, mental and social well-being and improve access to quality, affordable health care.

The new rule will be posted in the Federal Register on August 14 and is scheduled to take effect October 15, 2019. The rule is not retroactive.

The Oregon Health Authority encourages anyone who has questions about how the federal public charge rule may affect them or members of their family to seek counsel from a qualified immigration attorney. A list of attorneys can be found at the Oregon Immigration Resource: https://oregonimmigrationresource.org/.

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http://bit.ly/2N0i5y8

Recreational use advisory for Upper Klamath Lake updated August 13 - 08/13/19

August 13, 2019

Recreational use advisory for Upper Klamath Lake updated August 13

PORTLAND, Ore.— The Oregon Health Authority updated a recreational use health advisory today for Upper Klamath Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The lake is in Klamath County.

The advisory, originally issued July 19, applied to the Eagle Ridge County Park area of Upper Klamath Lake. OHA updates an advisory when new sampling data is received. Sampling data received Aug. 8 showed toxin levels above recreational guideline values in the Howard’s Bay area of Upper Klamath Lake. Satellite imagery shows the entire lake affected by a cyanobacterial bloom. Out of caution, OHA is updating the advisory to apply to the entire lake and will continue to evaluate new information as it becomes available.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit Upper Klamath Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

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http://bit.ly/2OVCNSl

Reminder: Seasonal health advisory in effect for Lake Billy Chinook - 08/13/19

August 13, 2019

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-678-7572, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Reminder: Seasonal health advisory in effect for Lake Billy Chinook

Precautionary recreational use advisory issued June 11; OHA not aware of algal blooms in lake

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority is reminding the public that a precautionary recreational use health advisory for the 2019 cyanobacterial (harmful algal) bloom season remains in effect for Lake Billy Chinook due to cyanobacterial blooms that routinely develop in the lake.

Oregon Health Authority is not aware of any cyanobacterial blooms in the lake at this time. However, blooms can develop throughout the season and in areas that are not visually monitored by Jefferson County, Oregon State Parks or the U.S. Forest Service.

Lake Billy Chinook is located about 12 miles west of Madras, in Jefferson County. The advisory will remain in effect through Nov. 1, 2019.

Tests done at Lake Billy Chinook since 2015 show that blooms in the lake consistently produce cyanotoxins over OHA’s recreational use health guideline values for people and pets. In the past, OHA would issue and lift advisories on the lake as data were made available. Testing is costly, making it difficult for local water body managers to regularly test the lake during times when blooms occur. This makes it challenging to determine when cyanotoxins are being produced, and if an advisory is needed.

As a result, OHA and local partners determined that a 2019 seasonal advisory for the lake is appropriate. At this time, the OHA Public Health Division is reminding the public of the steps to take to reduce exposure to cyanobacterial blooms and the cyanotoxins that may be present throughout the season. OHA staff will evaluate the effectiveness of this advisory at the end of the 2019 season.

Activities to avoid in areas affected by cyanobacterial blooms

In areas of the lake where cyanobacterial blooms have been identified or where you believe water is affected by a bloom, avoid swimming, water-skiing, wake-boarding, tubing, and other high-speed water activities. Watch children and pets to be sure they are not swallowing water or coming in contact with cyanobacterial blooms washed up on the shore or dried on rocks. Do not use lake water for drinking as camping-style filters and boiling do not remove the toxins.

Enjoy non-water-related activities at Lake Billy Chinook

In affected areas of the lake when there is a bloom, non-water-related activities such as camping, hiking, biking, picnicking and bird-watching can be enjoyed with very little possibility of exposure to cyanotoxins. Certain water-related activities can be safe. These include canoeing, fishing and boating, if boating speeds are kept low to avoid kicking up spray that could be inhaled.

What to look for

Cyanobacterial blooms are not unique to lakes in Oregon. Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to any water body to always be alert to signs of cyanobacterial blooms because only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are tested by state, federal and local agencies.

Certain water body conditions can help people identify when a bloom may be present. People and their pets should avoid areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, a thick mat is present, or when bright green cells can be seen suspended in the water column, making the water a brighter shade of green. In areas where blooms are found, people should avoid swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets made during high-speed water activities, such as water-skiing or power-boating. A good rule of thumb when encountering something in the water that doesn’t look familiar: “When in doubt, stay out.”

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area. Children are most vulnerable to exposure and illness due to their size and level of activity. If you or someone in your family develops any of these symptoms after your visit to an Oregon lake or waterway, contact OHA at 971-673-0440 for health information or to report the illness.

Pets are at risk, too

Over the past several years OHA has received many reports of dog illnesses and even deaths due to exposure to bloom-affected waters in Oregon. Dogs are more likely to have higher exposure to cyanotoxins than humans because they lick cyanobacteria off rocks and off their fur, eat the scum, or drink affected water. Symptoms of exposure range from lethargy, no appetite and vomiting to drooling, twitching, inability to stand or walk, convulsions and paralysis. Symptoms develop within the first hour or two after exposure and can be deadly. If a pet develops any symptoms, it should be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. OHA also takes pet illness reports; call 971-673-0440 for more information.

Other concerns

Drinking water directly from areas of Lake Billy Chinook affected by a cyanobacterial bloom is especially dangerous when toxins are present. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Drinking water at campgrounds and day use areas should not be affected, but if you have any questions or concerns, contact campground management or the local health department.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website that is also available by phone. OHA will update information for Lake Billy Chinook when new data are available. To learn what water bodies are being sampled for the season and whether an advisory has been issued or lifted, visit the Cyanobacteria Blooms website: http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “current cyanobacteria advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #

Public Health Advisory Board meets August 15 - 08/09/19

August 9, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss 2019-21 legislative investment in public health modernization; discuss CCO 2.0 contract provisions that advance population health; discuss Public Health Division health equity initiatives; discuss progress towards Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan suicide prevention priority; adopt opioid accountability metric.

When: Aug. 15, 2-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Also available remotely by telephone at 877-873-8017, access code 767068; and by webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4888122320415752707.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom, 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2yNRig9

Conference of Local Health Officials meets August 15 - 08/09/19

August 9, 2019

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO).

Agenda: Public health modernization program element and funding; work priorities for the CLHO Systems and Innovation Subcommittee; joint leadership team, Public Health Advisory Board (PHAB), PHAB subcommittees and Public Health Division staff updates.

The agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

When: Aug. 15, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: The meeting being held via webinar.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, 971-673-2284, a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Ks9WB0

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets August 9 by webinar - 08/05/19

Aug. 5, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets August 9 by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board's Incentives and Funding Subcommittee.

Agenda: Approve June 17 meeting minutes; discuss use of 2019-21 legislative investment in public health modernization.

When: Aug. 9, noon to 1 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: By webinar and by conference call at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#

Background:Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops recommendations for the board's consideration.

For more information, please visit the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us

 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Health Policy Board meets August 6 in Portland - 08/02/19

August 2, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Health Policy Board meets August 6 in Portland

What: The monthly meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

Agenda: welcome; minutes approval; liaison updates; OHA report; CCO 2.0 update; legislative update; policy priority area review, public testimony, state health improvement plan; health equity.

When: August 6, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, access code 915042#.

For more information, please visit the board’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin, 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Recreational use advisory issued for Odell Lake August 2 - 08/02/19

Aug. 2, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued for Odell Lake August 2

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for Odell Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The lake is in Klamath County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit Odell Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas. People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

South Tenmile Lake recreational use health advisory lifted August 1 - 08/01/19

Aug. 1, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

South Tenmile Lake recreational use health advisory lifted August 1

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory for South Tenmile Lake in Coos County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in South Tenmile Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Veterans_Behavioral_Health_Report.png
Veterans_Behavioral_Health_Report.png
OHA, ODVA to host community forums on veterans behavioral health (Photo) - 08/01/19

Join us for Statewide Community Forums on Veterans' Behavioral Healthcare

For the schedule of forum dates, visit http://bit.ly/orvethealth

Aug. 1, 2019

Media contacts: Saerom England (OHA), 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us Nicole Hoeft (ODVA), 503-373-2386, nicole.hoeft@state.or.us

OHA, ODVA to host community forums on veterans behavioral health

Community input to inform five-year strategic plan

One in four Oregon veterans experience frustration in seeking care for mental health or substance use issues. The Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs today announced a statewide tour over the next several months to solicit input from communities across Oregon regarding veterans behavioral health needs and services.

The Oregon Legislature invested $3.1 million over two biennia toward veterans behavioral health. OHA and ODVA dedicated a portion of the funding to commission a needs assessment study to identify challenges and opportunities for reforms. The resulting study, written by Portland-based consulting firm Rede Group is now available on the OHA website.

"Oregon veterans have given their time and talents to serve our nation in times of war and peace. I am deeply concerned about the challenges that veterans reported in accessing behavioral health services," said OHA behavioral health director Steve Allen. "However, I’m encouraged by the strong partnership among OHA, ODVA, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Oregon Legislature, who are all motivated to make needed reforms. We hope that community members across the state will become a part of this unprecedented partnership during our state tour."

The report, Oregon Veterans’ Behavioral Health Services Improvement Study,

  • Describes the availability of behavioral health services for Oregon veterans.
  • Provides findings regarding barriers veterans face in accessing behavioral health services.
  • Recommends policy and other changes that may improve the accessibility and quality of behavioral health services for Oregon veterans.

The recommendations include proposed steps to strengthen services and outreach for veterans, including:

  • Reduce stigma about behavioral health issues to help more veterans feel comfortable seeking care.
  • Strengthen suicide prevention programs.
  • Improve care coordination for veterans and tailor services to better address the experiences those who have served in the military have faced.
  • Expand the number of peer specialists who have their own first-hand knowledge of veterans issues and can provide effective support.
  • Recruit more treatment providers to serve veterans.

"Unfortunately, the recent report confirms what many who serve veterans and those in the field of behavioral health already knew: too many Oregon veterans are not getting the services and care they need and deserve. The state is committed to reversing this trend. To truly make a difference, we will need the involvement of informed, active community-level partners and stakeholders throughout the state," said ODVA director Kelly Fitzpatrick.

Community Engagement Tour

The community engagement tour, which begins Aug. 8 in Bend, fulfills the Rede Group’s first recommendation in the report: Provide communities a forum for local-level problem solving. At the local meetings, OHA and ODVA will seek feedback from local veterans, service providers and policymakers on the Rede Group’s 16 total recommendations. Locations for these community meetings were chosen to obtain a diverse perspective from rural, urban, and frontier veterans, health care providers and community members. Input from these sessions will be used to develop OHA’s five-year strategic plan to better meet the behavioral health needs of Oregon veterans, in close collaboration with ODVA and the federal VA. The strategic plan is expected to be published in early 2020.

The below schedule is subject to change as OHA consults with tribal leadership on their engagement preferences. Please periodically check the OHA website for updates to the schedule. While all forums are free and open to the public, registration is required.

Bend – Thursday, Aug. 8

Astoria – Tuesday, Aug. 20

Coos Bay – Wednesday, Aug. 28

Eugene – Thursday, Aug. 29

Salem – Wednesday, Sept. 4

Klamath Falls – Wednesday, Sept. 11

Lakeview – Thursday, Sept. 12

Portland – Monday, Sept. 16; Tuesday, Sept. 17

The Dalles – Tuesday, Sept. 24

Pendleton – Tuesday, Oct. 8

Baker City – Wednesday, Oct. 9

Ontario – Thursday, Oct. 10

Medford – Wednesday, Oct. 16

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact The Rede Group, 503-764-9696, 711 TTY, or Hforum@redegroup.co">VBHforum@redegroup.co at least 48 hours before the meeting.

https://bit.ly/2YzvDXI

Metrics report highlights improvements in children's health and behavioral health - 07/30/19

July 30, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Metrics report highlights improvements in children’s health and behavioral health

Oregon coordinated care organizations (CCOs) continue to advance health system transformation by focusing on better care and better health outcomes while controlling health care costs.

The 2018 CCO Metrics Report details Oregon’s pay-for-performance program where OHA created a quality pool from a percentage of monthly CCO payments to reward performance. To earn their full incentive payment, CCOs have to meet benchmarks or improvement targets on at least 12 of the 16 measures and meet a performance goal related to enrollment in patient-centered primary care homes.

Highlights of the 2018 report:

  • The percentage of children in foster care who received mental, physical, and dental health assessments has improved by more than 200 percent since becoming an incentive metric in 2015.
  • Dental sealants for children ages 6 to 14 has improved by 34 percent from 2015 to 2018.
  • While emergency department utilization decreased for all members between 2017 to 2018, the decline was greater for members with mental illness. This is the first year of the incentive metric on emergency department utilization among members with mental illness.
  • CCO performance on depression screening and follow-up has more than doubled since 2015, increasing from 27.9 percent to 64 percent in 2018.

"This is a good opportunity to take a temperature check on where we’ve succeeded and where we need greater focus for the next five years," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics. "We know that incentives work. Oregon’s CCO metrics will continue to play a key role in driving performance improvements in priority areas such as behavioral health, health equity, and children’s health."

The quality pool model rewards CCOs for the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This model increasingly rewards CCOs for outcomes, rather than utilization of services, and is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s vision for better health, better care, and lower costs.

The quality pool amount was 4.25 percent of monthly payments in 2018, for a total of more than $188 million. While all CCOs showed improvement on a majority of measures, 12 out of 15 earned 100 percent of their quality pool dollars, which left nearly $11 million for the challenge pool. It was distributed to CCOs that met the benchmark or improvement target on four measures which impact early childhood: assessments for children in DHS custody, childhood immunization status, developmental screenings in the first 36 months of life and timeliness of prenatal care.

The Metrics and Scoring Committee established the performance metrics for 2020 at its July 19 meeting. Two of the new measures are part of a multi-year strategy focused on the health sector’s role in preparing children for kindergarten (well-child visits for children ages 3-6 and preventive dental visits for ages 1-5). The other new measures focus on immunizations for adolescents and ensuring those newly diagnosed with substance use disorders are able to access treatment.

For a detailed report of the CCO metrics and how much each CCO earned through the pay-for-performance program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website.

# # #

OHA to update rules governing coordinated care organizations in August - 07/29/19

July 29, 2019

Media contact: Sarah Kelber, 503-975-6633, ah.kelber@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.kelber@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA to update rules governing coordinated care organizations in August

Starting Aug. 1 the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will convene a series of advisory committees that will help develop the updated Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) that govern Oregon's coordinated care organizations (CCOs) effective Jan. 1, 2020. These rules are part of the next phase of Oregon’s health care transformation known as “CCO 2.0.”

The draft rules:

  • Align with the 2020-2024 coordinated care organization contracts.
  • Incorporate CCO 2.0 policy recommendations adopted by the Oregon Health Policy Board to improve the health of Oregon Health Plan members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue Oregon’s health care delivery transformation.
  • Include expanded CCO financial reporting requirements.
  • Feature new rules outlining CCO responsibilities regarding traditional health workers, social determinants of health, and health equity.

Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures. Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs.

When:

  • Aug. 1, 9 a.m. to noon: Social determinants of health and equity.
  • Aug. 6, 9 a.m. to noon: Draft core structural rules OAR 410-141-3500, definitions) through 3545, SUD certification and licensure).
  • Aug. 6, 1-4 p.m.: Draft core structural rules OAR 410-141-3550, dispute resolution) through 3700, CCO application and contracting procedures).
  • Aug. 7, 9 a.m. to noon: Draft core structural rules OAR 410-141-3705, criteria for CCOs) through 3825, excluded services and limitations).
  • Aug. 7, 1-4 p.m.: Draft core structural rules OAR 410-141-3830, Prioritized List of Health Services) through 3855, preferred drug list).
  • Aug. 8, 9 a.m. to noon: Traditional health workers.
  • Aug. 8, 1-4 p.m.: Financial reporting.
  • Aug. 13, 9:30-11:30 a.m.: Care coordination rules.
  • Aug. 14, 9:30-11:30 a.m.: Draft core structural rules on grievances and appeals.
  • Aug. 14, 1:30-3:30 p.m.: Draft core structural rules on non-emergency medical transportation.
  • Aug. 15, 9:30 a.m. to noon: Financial reporting.
  • Aug. 15, 1-4 p.m.: Social determinants of health.
  • Aug. 22, 1:30-3:30 p.m.: Financial reporting.

RAC meeting information: At each meeting, members will learn background information and purpose of the RAC, review the rulemaking process, review draft amended rule language and discuss next steps. Each meeting will include time for public comment at the end. Find agendas and call-in information and double-check the location of the meetings in advance of each meeting on the RAC website.

Where: Barbara Roberts Human Services Building Room 137A-D, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem.

Who: OHA is recruiting for CCO 2.0 RACs to include representation from key stakeholders and interested parties. Learn how to request to participate in the RACs on the committee website by July 31.

Program contact: Health Systems Division at ulemaking@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank"">cco2.0rulemaking@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Once the committees have given input on the draft rules, OHA will file notices of proposed rulemaking with the intent to file the rules effective Jan. 1. To keep informed during the remainder of the rulemaking process, sign up for updates on the Oregon Health Plan website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact ulemaking@dhsoha.state.or.us">cco2.0rulemaking@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Health Evidence Review Commission meets August 8 in Wilsonville - 07/25/19

July 25, 2019

Contacts: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission. It will follow the public meeting of the commission's Value-based Benefits Subcommittee.

When: Thursday, August 8, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Rooms 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville. The public also may attend by webinar and via a listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 801373.

Agenda: HERC will hear a report from the Value-based Benefits Subcommittee (VbBS) meeting held earlier in the day. Topics that remain unresolved at the conclusion of the morning's VbBS meeting will not be heard by HERC until a later date. Public notice of tabled topics will be announced 28 days before their next scheduled discussion.

HERC also will consider the following topics: proposed new coverage guidance topics: multicomponent interventions to improve screening for breast, cervical or colorectal cancer, non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation for cluster and migraine headache (e.g., Gammacore), percutaneous occlusion of the left atrial appendage in atrial fibrillation (e.g., Watchman), patient and radiologic factors influencing outcomes in total knee arthroplasty; status of the Health Technology Assessment Subcommittee; temporary percutaneous mechanical circulatory support with Impella devices: coverage guidance, Prioritized List changes; community health workers for patients with chronic disease: multisector intervention report.

Public testimony will be taken at the time of topic discussion for items on the final meeting agenda. Public testimony not related to a topic on the agenda will be taken at the end of the meeting.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event.

HERC Value-based Benefits Subcommittee meets August 8 in Wilsonville - 07/25/19

July 25, 2019

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Value-based Benefits Subcommittee.

When: Thursday, August 8, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Rooms 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville. The public also may attend by webinar and via a listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 801373.

Agenda: Items scheduled for discussion could include, but may not be limited to, the following topics: 2020 ICD-10-CM code placement; non-LANA certification for lymphedema providers; lead screening and investigation; repair of varicoceles in children and adolescents; biologic matrix for breast reconstruction; telephone and email visit guidelines; chronic lower extremity venous disease; vestibular rehabilitation; prolotherapy; incontinence procedures: sacral stimulation, artificial urinary sphincter, sling procedure for male urinary incontinence, urethral bulking injections for urinary incontinence; helmets for positional plagiocephaly; opportunistic salpingectomy guideline clarification; pancreatectomy/autologous islet cell transplantation for chronic pancreatitis; coverage guidance on temporary percutaneous mechanical circulatory support devices (IMPELLA); and various straightforward coding and guideline changes and corrections

Public testimony will be taken at the time of topic discussion for items on the final meeting agenda. There will be time at the end of the meeting for public testimony on items not on the agenda.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting. 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at C.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us.

http://bit.ly/2LIJODu

Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee extends meeting schedule - 07/23/19

July 23, 2019

What: The Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) is holding a series of public meetings. The purpose of the RAC is to implement requirements of SB 478 (2015). The series has been extended to two additional meetings on Aug. 9 and Aug. 30.

Agenda: Provide background information and purpose of RAC; review the rulemaking process; review draft rule language; request input and feedback, discuss next steps.

When: Remaining meetings are 9 a.m. to noon on July 26, August 9 and August 30.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public may attend by telephone via conference line by calling 888-363-4735, access code 1027039.

Who: The Toxic Free Kids Rules Advisory Committee includes representation of these key stakeholder categories: Oregon Environmental Council, The Toy Association, Oregon Business and Industry, American Chemistry Council, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Multnomah County Department of Health, Metro Regional Government, Washington Department of Ecology.

Program contact: Justin Waltz, 971-673-1217, justin.waltz@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Justin Waltz, 971-673-1217, 711 TTY, or justin.waltz@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2YoDQOa

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets July 25 - 07/23/19

July 23, 2019

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG).

When: July 25, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, eighth floor, Suite 850, Mary Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. Space is limited. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4851900018377321985 and conference line at 415-655-0060, listen-only code 818-084-927.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; Clinical Quality Metrics Registry (CQMR) update; 2020 benchmarks – TAG input; DHS custody measure; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2K2ecWc

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets July 24 - 07/23/19

July 23, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board and Oregon Health Authority staff to discuss how nurse staffing laws have been implemented and next steps for the program.

Agenda: Nurse Staffing Program discussion; “ideal state” discussion; next steps to achieve the “ideal state.”

When: July 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Matt Gilman, MPPA at 971-673-2317, 711 TTY or matt.s.gilman@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Y0Q3Jx