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News Releases
OHA accepting applications for Public Health Advisory Board - 10/18/19

October 18, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA accepting applications for Public Health Advisory Board

The Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is seeking applicants for the state Public Health Advisory Board (PHAB)

OHA invites applications from people who meet the following criteria:

  • A public health expert in academia.
  • A local public health administrator who supervises public health programs and activities in Benton, Clackamas, Deschutes, Jackson, Lane, Marion, Multnomah or Washington counties.

This position serves a four-year term that begins on Jan. 1, 2020. Board members are appointed by the Governor.

To apply, submit the following documentation to executive.appointments@oregon.gov by Dec. 1:

  1. A completed executive appointment interest form, which is available on the Governor’s office website.
  2. A resume or brief biographical sketch.
  3. A brief statement of interest.

Information about the Public Health Advisory Board is available on the board’s webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/phab

For more information, contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 or a.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup meets October 22 - 10/18/19

October 17, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup meets October 22

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup.

Agenda: Brainstorm and discuss content for a resource document to assist medical settings and recovery peer agencies that are adding or contemplating adding recovery peers to enhance medical responses to individuals with substance use disorders.

When: October 22, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Tabor Space, 5441 SE Belmont Street, Portland.

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges, with a focus on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, visit the RBHC websit.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force meets October 25 - 10/18/19

October 18, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force meets October 25

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force.

When: October 25, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the task force, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary. There will be time for public comment at the beginning of the meeting at approximately 9:05 a.m.

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force webpage.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA issues corrective action plan to Health Share of Oregon - 10/18/19

October 17, 2019

OHA issues corrective action plan to Health Share of Oregon

Plan addresses OHP members' transportation problems

Salem, Ore. -- The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has issued a corrective action plan that requires Health Share of Oregon to improve non-emergent medical transportation (NEMT) services that it provides to Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members.

Health Share of Oregon (HSO) is a coordinated care organization that serves approximately 309,000 OHP members in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties. NEMT is a core benefit of the Oregon Health Plan. Members can access these transportation services for rides to their medical, dental and behavioral health appointments.

Health Share of Oregon has been working with OHA to improve this critical service for its members. Health Share has been meeting with OHA to provide monitoring data and discuss improvements it has made in the program.

In issuing the corrective action plan, OHA found that Health Share did not provide reliable non-emergent transportation services to covered appointments and that access to care for members has been, and continues to be, disrupted.

OHP members in Health Share’s service area have notified OHA of problems they have experienced arranging transportation to non-emergency health care appointments including: transportation providers failing to pick members up for appointments or after appointments to return home, late arrivals, cancellation of rides with short notice, long call center wait times, and lack of appropriate equipment in vehicles to support members' needs. Transportation providers have complained that Health Share’s vendor, GridWorks, has not paid them for rides.

Health Share is required to provide OHA a turn-around plan within 14 days to correct the current non-compliance with NEMT contract requirements and rules. OHA recommends Health Share hire a consultant experienced in NEMT to help improve services for OHP members.

OHA is requiring Health Share to provide weekly reports that include the following performance data, which HSO began reporting Sept. 13:

  • On time, late or “no shows” performance.
  • Total ridership by mode.
  • Total call volume.
  • Average speed to answer calls.
  • Call center service level.
  • Average call handle time.

# # #

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets October 18 - 10/17/19

October 17, 2019

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: October 18, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 775 Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3895887851300669185 and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, review minutes, and general updates; public testimony; Quality Incentive Program and CCO 2.0; obesity measure update; new travel reimbursement policy; continuous enrollment for 2020; documenting reasons for 2020 measure retirement; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Missing Oregon State Hospital patient located - 10/16/19

October 16, 2019

The patient reported missing Monday by Oregon State Hospital has been located. Please reference Eugene Police Department Case Number EPD 19-16811.

On Tuesday, Oct. 15, an employee of the hospital recognized the patient at Washington Jefferson Park in Eugene. The staff member called police, who took him into custody at about 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. The patient is at the Lane County Jail, awaiting transport back to the hospital.

# # #

 

Recreational use advisory issued October 16 for North Tenmile Lake - 10/16/19

October 16, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued October 16 for North Tenmile Lake

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for North Tenmile Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The lake is in Coos County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit North Tenmile Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities, regardless of whether a recreational use health advisory is in place, should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas. Dogs can also be exposed to cyanotoxins when present by licking their fur, licking cyanobacteria off rocks or eating cells from a bloom.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Peace-Dawn-Wickham.jpg
Peace-Dawn-Wickham.jpg
Oregon State Hospital seeks missing patient (Photo) - 10/14/19

October 14, 2019

Media Contacts: Rebeka Gipson-King, OHA, 503-756-0366, ebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us
Oregon State Police PIO, osppio@state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital seeks missing patient

A 33-year-old Oregon State Hospital psychiatric patient, Peace Wickham, was reported missing Monday, Oct. 14. Anyone seeing Wickham should call 911, the Oregon State Police at 800-452-7888 or *OSP on their mobile device.

Wickham is not considered to be an imminent danger to himself or others. He is accused of unauthorized departure. OSP is conducting an investigation to help locate him. Wickham should not be approached.

Wickham was admitted from Lane County to the Junction City campus of Oregon State Hospital Sept. 7, 2016. Wickham was found guilty except for insanity on the charges of assault, unlawful possession of a weapon, and felon in possession of a restricted weapon.

He was last seen at approximately 12:30 p.m., on the grounds of Luther House, 1824 University St., Eugene, Oregon, where he was attending a group activity. Wickham walked away from the group and left the immediate area.

Hospital officials, who reported the missing patient to state and local law enforcement agencies, described Wickham as a male, 6 feet 2 inches tall, 255 pounds, with a shaved head and brown eyes. He has two tattoos, the state of California on his right forearm and Hawaii on his left forearm. When last seen, he was wearing a gray fleece sweat shirt, tan pants, and tan hiking shoes with rubber laces.

OSP will issue any future news releases regarding this case.

Attached Media Files: Peace-Dawn-Wickham.jpg
Lawsuits temporarily block the Trump Administration's public charge rule - 10/11/19

October 11, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Lawsuits temporarily block the Trump Administration’s public charge rule

California, Washington and New York federal judges today issued injunctions temporarily blocking the Department of Homeland Security’s new public charge rule that would make it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards. The new rule was scheduled to take effect on Oct. 15 and, among other changes, expands the list of benefits that the federal government could consider in deciding whether a person can enter the United States or obtain lawful permanent residency. Non-emergency Oregon Health Plan coverage (i.e., Medicaid) for non-pregnant adults 21 and older could be one of the newly impacted programs.

The Oregon Health Authority is the state agency responsible for protecting the health of all 4 million people living in Oregon. In a previous statement issued after the original federal rule was announced, the Oregon Health Authority said, "We know that health coverage contributes to healthier pregnancies, births, and childhood outcomes. When people have health coverage, they are better able to work, go to school and contribute in other ways to their local economy. Employers benefit from a healthier workforce, insurance costs are lower, and there is less absenteeism. As a result, this rule is in direct conflict with our agency’s mission, which is to help people and communities achieve optimum physical, mental and social well-being and improve access to quality, affordable health care."

OHA wants to inform Oregon residents that under the current rule, the only public benefit programs in Oregon that are subject to public charge consideration are cash assistance programs (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and Social Security Income) and long-term care. Today’s injunctions prevent the public charge definition from being extended to certain additional federally funded programs like non-emergency Medicaid for non-pregnant adults 21 and older.

OHA encourages anyone who has questions or concerns about how public charge may affect them or members of their family to seek counsel from a qualified immigration attorney.

More information on the public charge rule is available here, including frequently asked questions in eight languages.

Conference of Local Health Officials meets October 17 - 10/11/19

October 11, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets October 17

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). The October meeting also serves as the annual CLHO meeting.

Agenda: Annual CLHO subcommittee reports; CLHO officer elections; public health system work to address funding and program element process improvements; overdose prevention funding; suicide prevention funding; Tobacco Prevention and Education Program funding; Executive Order 19-09 on Vaping; Environmental Health Intergovernmental Agreement work group.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ before the meeting.

When: Oct. 17, 9:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. No conference call option is available for the public.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA, OLCC file rules banning flavored vaping sales, including online - 10/11/19

EDITORS: Representatives from Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission will discuss the new flavored vaping sales ban rules today (Oct. 11) during a media availability at 12:30 p.m. at OLCC Headquarters, 9079 SE McLoughlin Blvd., Portland. Conference line: 646-749-3122, access code 450-658-589; when prompted, use the hashtag symbol (#).

Oct. 11, 2019

Media contacts:

Jonathan Modie, OHA, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Mark Pettinger, OLCC, 971-235-7561, k.Pettinger@oregon.gov">mark.pettinger@oregon.gov

OHA, OLCC file rules banning flavored vaping sales, including online

Rules put into effect Governor’s executive order aimed at reducing youth use

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission today filed temporary rules that put into effect Governor Kate Brown’s Oct. 4 executive order banning all flavored vaping product sales in the state.

The temporary rules, which will remain in effect for six months starting Oct. 15, prohibit the sale of all flavored vaping products — including online sales — to consumers in Oregon. The ban covers all tobacco and cannabis (marijuana and hemp) vaping products that contain natural or artificial flavors including, but not limited to, chocolate, coffee, cocoa, menthol, mint, wintergreen, vanilla, honey, coconut, licorice, nuts, fruit, any candy, dessert, alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage, herb or spice.

Tobacco-flavored tobacco or nicotine products, as well as marijuana-flavored marijuana or THC products that use only marijuana-derived flavorings, including terpenes, are not included in the ban.

Retailers found violating the temporary rules will receive a warning letter and recommendations on coming into compliance. Continued violations could result in civil penalties of up to $500 per day, per violation. In addition, cannabis retailers or processors could face violations up to and including cancellation of their license.

Additional components of vaping products could be banned in the future. The Governor’s executive order directs OHA and OLCC to "take immediate action and adopt additional emergency rules" to prohibit any chemical or contaminant found to have caused or contributed to vaping-associated lung injuries being investigated in Oregon and 48 other states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. There are nine cases of this illness in Oregon, including two deaths.

OHA and OLCC officials say the temporary rules filed today are significant steps toward stemming the well-documented tide of e-cigarette use and vaping by youth, as well as keeping products that may expose people to unsafe chemicals and other contaminants off store shelves.

Among Oregon high school students who use e-cigarettes exclusively, nearly 90 percent use flavored e-cigarette products, OHA found. And there is strong evidence that e-cigarettes increase youth nicotine addiction and increase the risk that youth will start using combustible tobacco such as cigarettes.

"We have been warning Oregonians about the health effects of these products before this current outbreak of serious lung injury added more evidence of the dangers of vaping," said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist. "These rules stop the sale of a potentially dangerous product, and they’re part of a comprehensive approach to curbing youth vaping and additional cases of vaping-associated lung injuries."

He points to additional directives in the Governor’s executive order that call on OHA and OLCC to develop consumer warnings for THC and non-THC products; expand easy access to FDA-approved cessation resources; implement a statewide prevention and education campaign; and submit legislative proposals with long-term solutions to reduce public health harms from vaping.

The temporary rules affect not only OLCC recreational marijuana-licensed retailers and processors, but also alcohol licensees that sell nicotine vaping products, including retailers that sell beer and wine, bars and taverns, and liquor store agents.

The OLCC said the flavor ban is just the latest step in its evolution from focusing on public safety to an agency with an equivalent focus on consumer protection. Through increased review of products sold in the OLCC-licensed retail market and the development of testing capacity, the OLCC will continue to work to refine consumer product disclosure.

"This commission is working very hard to ensure the cannabis industry can grow, thrive and compete in the Oregon marketplace," said Paul Rosenbaum, chair of the OLCC. "We are doing so with a clear focus on the integrity of the marketplace for businesses, consumers and public safety. However, it is our overwhelming responsibility to protect public health and our consumers from undue risk. This agency’s rapid and nimble action to implement the Governor’s executive order is exactly why regulated cannabis will always be a superior consumer choice over illegal markets."

Additional rules were filed earlier this week. On Wednesday OHA filed temporary rules that require health care providers to report hospitalizations and deaths due to "vaping-associated lung injury." Physicians have long had to report "uncommon illness of potential public health significance," but the new rules are intended to reduce confusion by specifically naming this new lung illness as reportable by Oregon law to public health agencies.

Due to the ongoing investigation of vaping-associated lung injuries, OHA health officials continue to recommend people stop vaping immediately. Those experiencing symptoms of the illnesses, such as shortness of breath, cough or chest pain should immediately seek medical attention.

Those needing help quitting vaping cannabis and nicotine can take advantage of a variety of cessation services, including the Oregon Quit Line, Truth Initiative, Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Helpline, and the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Helpline. Information is available at http://healthoregon.org/vaping.

# # #

*Updated Time* Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Liquor Control Commission will hold press conference on temporary vaping ban - 10/11/19

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, OHA, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us Mark Pettinger, OLCC, 971-235-7561, k.pettinger@oregon.gov">mark.pettinger@oregon.gov

Updated Time: Media Advisory

Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Liquor Control Commission will hold press conference on temporary vaping ban

Agencies will explain temporary rules and implementation process for banning the sale of flavored nicotine and THC vaping products

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will hold a joint press conference today, Friday, Oct. 11 at 12:30 p.m. to discuss the adoption of temporary rules resulting from an Executive Order issued by Governor Kate Brown to address the vaping health crisis.

Leaders and staff from OLCC and OHA's Public Health Division will explain the implication and implementation of their respective temporary rules, which establish a temporary ban on the sale of flavored nicotine and THC vaping products.

The press conference is at 12:30 p.m., or about 30 minutes after the conclusion of the OLCC's special meeting at OLCC headquarters in Portland. The OLCC special meeting will start 11:30 a.m. at OLCC Headquarters, 9079 SE McLoughlin Blvd.

To access the press conference by phone, dial 646-749-3122, access code 450-658-589; when prompted for a pin, use the hashtag symbol (#).There will not be a live video feed from the press conference.

Recreational use advisory issued October 11 for Willow Creek Reservoir - 10/11/19

October 11, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued October 11 for Willow Creek Reservoir

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for Willow Creek Reservoir due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The reservoir is in Morrow County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit Willow Creek Reservoir and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities, regardless of whether a recreational use health advisory is in place, should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas. Dogs can also be exposed to cyanotoxins when present by licking their fur, licking cyanobacteria off rocks or eating cells from a bloom.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees meetings - 10/10/19

October 10, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees meetings

What: Subcommittees of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) are tasked with identifying strategies and measures, and developing work plans for implementing the SHIP. Each of the five subcommittees is focused on one of the following priority areas:

  • Access to equitable preventive health care.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress.
  • Behavioral health.
  • Economic drivers of health.
  • Institutional bias.

Agenda: Finalize priority goals, identify key indicators, and start exploring possible strategies.

Where: All meetings are held at the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Meetings are also available remotely. For remote meeting attendance, visit the subcommittee meeting page:

When:

  • Institutional Bias Subcommittee: Wednesday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m. to noon, Room 1B.
  • Behavioral Health Subcommittee: Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Economic Drivers of Health Subcommittee: Friday, Oct. 25, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.
  • Access to Equitable Preventive Health Care Subcommittee: Monday, Oct. 28, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.
  • Adversity, Trauma and Toxic Stress Subcommittee: Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2-4 p.m., Room 1D.

All meetings are open to the public. A five-minute public comment period will be held near the end of each meeting; comments are limited to one minute.

Background: Oregon’s SHIP identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath of people in Oregon. The SHIP is based on findings of the State Health Assessment.

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us">Christy.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Recreational use advisory issued October 9 for Lake Selmac - 10/09/19

Oct. 9, 2019

Recreational use advisory issued October 9 for Lake Selmac

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for Lake Selmac in Josephine County due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities such as water skiing or power boating in areas of the lake where blooms are identified.

People are encouraged to visit Lake Selmac and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities, regardless of whether a recreational use health  advisory is in place, should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas. Dogs can also be exposed to cyanotoxins when present by licking their fur, licking cyanobacteria off rocks, or eating cells from a bloom.

 

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Public Health Advisory Board meets October 17 - 10/09/19

October 9, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review 2017-19 public health modernization evaluation report and plan for the 2019-21 evaluation; discuss plans to modernize Oregon Health Authority public health survey systems in the 2019-21 biennium; review Oregon Health Policy Board-adopted definition of health equity; discuss wildfire policy development and health effects of wildfire smoke; and receive information about progress toward oral health and tobacco prevention goals in the State Health Improvement Plan and provide input on strategies.

When: Thursday, Oct. 17, 2-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Also available remotely by phone at 877-873-8017, access code 767068 and by webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4888122320415752707.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2p5D8p1

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets October 9 - 10/08/19

October 8, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup.

Agenda: Identify and prioritize workgroup values related to foster youth peer project; decide on a process for selection of implementing organizations.

When: October 8, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2AQXogV

Notice of public comment period for Dental Pilot Project Program - 10/08/19

October 8, 2019

What: The Oral Health Program in the Center for Prevention and Health Promotion, Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division, seeks public comment on an application to the Dental Pilot Project Program. The application is available online at https://healthoregon.org/dpp.

When: The Dental Pilot Project Program public comment period closes Nov. 4.

Where: Submit public comment on the proposed application by mail, fax or email to:

Sarah Kowalski, RDH
Dental Pilot Project coordinator, Oral Health Program
800 NE Oregon Street, Suite 875
Portland, Oregon 97232-2186
Fax: 971-673-0231
Email: ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce and efficacy of teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; and teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons. For more information, please visit the Dental Pilot Project Program webpage at https://healthoregon.org/dpp.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2OuQPbR

Universally offered Home Visiting Rules Advisory Committee meets October 10 - 10/08/19

October 8, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) for Universally offered Home Visiting. Participation in the meeting will be limited to RAC members, but a public comment period will take place at the end of every meeting.

When: Thursday, Oct. 10, 9 a.m. to noon. A 15-minute public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting; comments may be limited to three minutes or less, depending on the number of commenters. Those providing comments are encouraged to send written comments to anna.k.stiefvater@state.or.us.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public also may join by webinar at  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3305793161557339394 or by conference line at 631-992-3221, access code 579-688-820.

Background: As a result of the passage of SB 526 in the 2019 legislative session, new Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) must be proposed pertaining to a statewide universally offered newborn nurse home visiting program. These new rules will determine how the program is designed and implemented and specify the criteria for newborn nurse home visiting that must be covered by health benefit plans.

Program contact: Anna Stiefvater, 971-673-1490, anna.k.stiefvater@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kathryn (Katie) Kuspis at 971-673-2279, 711 TTY or yn.A.Kuspis@state.or.us">kathryn.a.kuspis@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2OvfywI

OHA signs contracts with 15 coordinated care organizations - 10/04/19

Correction: This release includes a correction to the 2020 average net payment and the percent of readiness review elements completed by CCO.

Oct. 4, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA signs contracts with 15 coordinated care organizations

Sets deadlines for CCOs to ensure they are ready to begin services January 1, 2020

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced it signed contracts with 15 organizations to serve as coordinated care organizations (CCOs) for the Oregon Health Plan’s nearly 1 million members. The contracts set new requirements for CCOs to improve care for OHP members and hold down cost increases in Oregon’s Medicaid program. The contracts represent the largest procurement in state history, totaling more than $6 billion for the 2020 contract year.

Eleven of the organizations received five-year contracts, and four organizations received one-year contracts. The new CCO contract services start January 1, 2020. Total costs for the 2020 contract year are within the state’s 3.4 percent growth target.

"These contracts build on the original vision for CCOs," said Oregon Health Authority director Patrick Allen. "At the same time, they hold CCOs and the Oregon Health Authority more accountable for working together to deliver better results for OHP members and taxpayers. Over the next five years, these contracts will give us more tools to help Oregonians be healthier at home, in school and in their communities, improve access to mental health and substance use services, reduce health disparities, and get better health and quality outcomes for dollars we spend on health care."

All CCOs are required to show they have a network that is adequate to serve their members. Eight of the contracts include conditions that must be met to address provider network adequacy and pending provider contracts. These eight CCOs have service areas where members will have CCO choices this fall.

The conditions require the CCOs to ensure OHA has appropriate, up-to-date information on their contracted providers to determine how many members they can serve in 2020. They must also demonstrate they can meet state and federal requirements that apply to all CCOs for access to in-network hospitals, primary care providers, specialists, and pediatric oral health providers. CCOs have until December 1 to meet the conditions.

Readiness review

OHA is also announcing the initial results of the first round of the federally mandated readiness review. CCOs were evaluated for their readiness to provide services starting January 1. All 15 CCOs met most or nearly all of the requirements.

The first round of evaluation included eight "critical" categories that directly impact a member’s ability to access health care services. In each category, CCOs were rated in 93 elements as: complete, progress sufficient to start operations, or incomplete. OHA is asking all CCOs to take actions to improve items rated as incomplete or progress sufficient to start operations. CCOs will be required to provide documentation showing the issues have been resolved by December 1.

OHA is finalizing remediation plans for the four CCOs that received one-year contracts (AllCare, Cascade Health Alliance, Umpqua, and Yamhill County Care Organization). During readiness review, many deficiencies in the applications were improved and requirements to correct those have been removed. OHA is working closely with the four CCOs to ensure they have the necessary plans, procedures and practices to meet the goals of CCO 2.0.

2020 capitation rates

OHA has also finalized the 2020 capitation rates for CCOs. These rates are the per-member-per-month amounts the state pays CCOs to coordinate health care for OHP members. The average net payment in 2020 is $471. The 2020 rates include multiple budget-neutral adjustments such as the inclusion of the quality pool program within the rates and a change in how hospitals are reimbursed. These changes impact a comparison between 2019 and 2020 rates. The rate increase meets the 3.4 percent rate-of-growth target for state general funds.

Due to the passage of HB 2267 in the Legislature’s 2019 session, 2020 rates will be recalculated in summer 2020 and be applied retroactively to January 2020. The recalculation is intended to account for any changes to CCO member enrollment during the transition from 2019 to 2020 contracts.

Additional resources:

The Contract Awardees page on the CCO 2.0 website has additional information about the contracts, readiness review and rates including:

  • Signed 2020 contracts.
  • Conditional letters.
  • Readiness review reports.
  • 2020 capitation rates.

CCO 2.0 Contract Awardees


Awardee Service Area Received Conditions Letter Projected members* Percent Readiness Review Elements Complete
AllCare CCO Inc. Curry, Jackson, Josephine, and partial Douglas Y 60,688 83%
Cascade Health Alliance Partial Klamath County   18,787 80%
Columbia Pacific CCO, LLC Clatsop, Columbia, and Tillamook   25,653 77%
Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization LLC Sherman, Gilliam, Morrow   51,235 84%
Health Share of Oregon Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Y 276,583 62%
InterCommunity Health Network dba InterCommunity Health Network Coordinated Care Organization Lincoln, Benton, and Linn   56,663 75%
Jackson County CCO, LLC, dba Jackson Care Connect Jackson County Y 31,331 77%
PacificSource Community Solutions - Central Oregon Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, and partial Klamath Counties   48,370 81%
PacificSource Community Solutions - Columbia Gorge Hood River and Wasco   12,034 81%
PacificSource Community Solutions - Lane Lane County Y 28,778 81%
PacificSource Community Solutions - Marion Polk Marion and Polk Y 100,434 81%
Trillium Community Health Plan Inc. (Trillium) Lane, Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington; partial Linn and Douglas Y 106,135 96%
Umpqua Health Alliance, LLC Douglas Y 27,629 94%
Western Oregon Advanced Health, LLC abn Advanced Health Coos and Curry   20,380 89%
Yamhill County Care Organization Yamhill, partial Polk and Washington Y 27,648 76%

*The projected numbers are based on the data used to populate the October 16 letters to OHP members. These numbers are subject to change, especially in areas where members are making choices about CCOs in October and November.

Cullaby Lake recreational use health advisory lifted October 3 - 10/03/19

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

October 3, 2019

Cullaby Lake recreational use health advisory lifted October 3

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Cullaby Lake in Clatsop County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Cullaby Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Upper Klamath Lake recreational use health advisory lifted October 3 - 10/03/19

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

October 3, 2019

Upper Klamath Lake recreational use health advisory lifted October 3

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Upper Klamath Lake in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Upper Klamath Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Public comments sought for proposed 50-bed rehab hospital in Hillsboro - 10/02/19

Oct. 2, 2019

What: A meeting to receive public comments on Encompass Health Corp.’s Certificate of Need Application #679 for a 50-bed rehabilitation hospital, to be located at NE Belknap Court in Hillsboro.

Agenda: Receive public comments on the proposed Certificate of Need Application #679.

When: Oct. 15, 1:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Hillsboro Public Library, first floor community room, 2850 NE Brookwood Pkwy, Hillsboro.

Background: The purpose of the Certificate of Need program is to provide reasonable access to quality health care, at a reasonable cost and control health care capital expenditures.

Program contact: Pam Krecklow, 971-673-3188, ecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us">pam.l.krecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pam Krecklow, at 971-673-3188, 711 TTY, or ecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us">pam.l.krecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public comments sought for proposed 50-bed rehab hospital in Tigard - 10/02/19

Oct. 2, 2019

What: A meeting to receive public comments on Post Acute Medical, LLC Certificate of Need Application #680 for a 50-bed rehabilitation hospital, to be located at 13333 SW 68th Parkway in Tigard.

Agenda: Receive public comments on the proposed Certificate of Need Application #680.

When: Oct. 14, 10 a.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Tigard Public Works Auditorium, 8777 SW Burnham Street, Tigard.

Background: The purpose of the Certificate of Need program is to provide reasonable access to quality health care, at a reasonable cost and control health care capital expenditures.

Program contact: Pam Krecklow, 971-673-3188, ecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us">pam.l.krecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pam Krecklow, at 971-673-3188, 711 TTY, or ecklow@state.or.us">pam.l.krecklow@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2ozOeCk

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets October 4 - 10/02/19

October 2, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Identify strategies and activities; draft a budget, create an application workgroup; identify potential lead organizations.

When: Thursday, October 3, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2oAHowk

OHA sparks social media conversation on mental health and addiction recovery - 09/30/19

September 30, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA sparks social media conversation on mental health and addiction recovery

The Oregon Health Authority invites Oregonians to join a celebration of recovery from addiction and mental illness by posting their stories on social media with the hashtag #MyRecoveryStory.

Helping OHA launch this campaign are five young Portland residents who shared reflections on their recovery journeys on video. In the videos, they look back and share what they wish they could tell their younger selves. From today to Friday, OHA is sharing their videos on its social media channels.

“I wish I would’ve known that addiction is a disease, not a moral failing,” said Tony Vezina, executive director and co-founder of 4th Dimension Recovery Center (4D), a community for young people 35 and under in recovery.

The staff of 4D consists of other young individuals with lived experience who can draw from their personal lessons as they walk alongside others in recovery.

“I wish I would’ve known healthier ways to process pain and anger,” said Lor Eftychiou, recovery support service coordinator at 4D.

By providing a space for individuals with lived experience to share their stories, OHA hopes to spread hope and encouragement for other young people who are experiencing behavioral health challenges.

Every September, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) sponsors Recovery Month, to increase awareness and understanding of mental health, problem gambling and substance use disorders and celebrate recovery. The 2019 theme is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Together We Are Stronger.”

“As someone who experiences mental health challenges, I know the peace and contentment that recovery can bring. I also know that recovery is not a linear process, and that it’s important to reach out to my support system when I’m struggling,” said Brandy Hemsley, OHA’s director of consumer activities. “As Recovery Month winds down, we need to keep the conversation going and encourage one another to reach out for the support we need. I am certain the voices in these videos will inspire hope for many young Oregonians and remind us that these kinds of struggles are a natural part of the human experience. You are not alone and there’s no need to be ashamed.”

On Friday, Oct. 4, OHA and 4th Dimension Recovery Center will host a Facebook Live event to wrap up the week.

How to participate

  1. Create an image or text social media post.
  2. Be sure to include the hashtag #MyRecoveryStory
  3. Want others to see and share your post? Make sure it’s public.
  4. Tune in on OHA’s Facebook page for a live panel on recovery at 3:30 p.m. Oct. 4.

Follow OHA on social media!

Behavioral health services

If you or a loved one is struggling with mental health or substance use challenges, help is available.

OHA provides options on vaping to Governor Kate Brown - 09/27/19

September 27, 2019

OHA provides options on vaping to Governor Kate Brown

Six-month ban among policy options to be considered

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has submitted a set of policy options to Gov. Kate Brown to prevent deaths and injuries linked to vaping, as state and federal investigators seek to identify the cause of recent cases.

These options would require review, coordination and implementation assistance from the Oregon Department of Justice and other state agencies.

The options include:

  1. Implement a six-month temporary moratorium on sale and display of all vaping products, including tobacco, nicotine, and cannabis, while the federal investigation is underway and Oregon’s evaluation of the ban is conducted. This moratorium should include online sales in Oregon. These options are provided independent of and without consideration of legal authority or approval.
  2. Increase access to FDA-approved tobacco-cessation methods (including nicotine-replacement therapy) and substance use disorder prevention services through:
    • Enhanced access to nicotine-replacement therapy in pharmacies, including easier reimbursement regardless of insurance coverage.
    • Increased access to training and billing reference materials for health care providers and pharmacists to improve their ability to counsel and support patients in their quit attempts and receive reimbursement.
    • Providing eight weeks of free nicotine-replacement therapy, without barriers, to all individuals who access the Oregon Tobacco Quit Line.
    • Facilitating access to cessation services in the community where individuals are already accessing services, including in school-based health centers.
  3. Implement a statewide prevention campaign aimed at discouraging the use of vaping and combustible products with a link to cessation services through:
    • Retail establishment signs and messaging to reinforce the risks of vaping.
    • Online communications, including through social media.
    • A multimedia campaign.
  4. Request that the Food and Drug Administration regulate vaping products and establish a moratorium on internet sales of tobacco and a moratorium on advertising of vaping products.
  5. Continue to encourage all health care providers to report cases of vaping-associated acute lung injury to OHA so the agency has more complete data and understanding of the health impact of vaping.
  6. Convene a workgroup of health experts and agency leads to provide further recommendations on short- and long-term policies and strategies as evidence and information continues to emerge on this evolving crisis.

If you or someone you know is ready to quit smoking or vaping, free help is available from the following resources:

Those who want help quitting cannabis or other substance use can call 1-800-662-HELP.

Switching to cigarettes or other combustible products is not a safer option.

Recreational use advisory issued for South Tenmile Lake Sept. 27, 2019 - 09/27/19

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued for South Tenmile Lake Sept. 27, 2019

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for South Tenmile Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The lake is in Coos County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit South Tenmile Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities, regardless of whether a recreational use health advisory is in place, should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas. Dogs can also be exposed to cyanotoxins when present by licking their fur, licking cyanobacteria off rocks or eating cells from a bloom.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Public Health Warning: People should stop vaping immediately - 09/26/19

EDITORS: OHA officials will discuss the state’s response to the vaping-associated illness outbreak during a media availability at 5:15 p.m. today. The event is at the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 177 (first floor).

Watch the livestream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9GFBhdicPw; conference line, 971-673-0714 or 888-363-4734, participant code 7108972.

September 26, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Warning: People should stop vaping immediately

Second vaping-related death in state confirmed; people who vape are at risk, officials say

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority is issuing a public health warning urging people to immediately stop using all vaping products. Today, the agency confirmed a second vaping-related death in the state.

This is the second death among the five previously reported cases. Oregon’s first fatality was announced on Sept. 3. All five cases are part of a national outbreak of severe lung injury linked to vaping and e-cigarette use.

“People should stop vaping immediately,” said Dean Sidelinger, MD, state health officer. “If you vape, whether it’s cannabis, nicotine or other products, please quit. These are addictive substances, and we encourage people to take advantage of free resources to help them quit.”

He added: “If you haven’t started vaping, don’t start.”

OHA officials say the most recent death was an individual who had been hospitalized with respiratory symptoms after vaping cannabis products. Nationally, there have been more than 800 cases, primarily among youths and young adults, in 46 states and one U.S. territory. A total of 12 additional deaths, including Oregon’s first fatality, have been reported in 10 states.

Those who have fallen ill in Oregon have been hospitalized after experiencing worsening symptoms, including shortness of breath, cough or chest pain. CDC and the FDA have not identified a cause, but all cases have reported e-cigarette use or vaping.

OHA investigators and local public health authorities continue to urge clinicians to be on alert for signs of severe respiratory illness among patients and report any cases.

Before the new illness reports, OHA was already concerned about the health risks of vaping products. A recent report by the agency details the health risks for the products including nicotine addiction, exposure to toxic chemicals known to cause cancer and increases in blood pressure.

Individuals who have recently vaped and are having difficulty breathing should seek medical attention immediately.

If you or someone you know smokes or vapes, we urge you to quit now. Free help is available from the following resources:

Those who want assistance quitting vaping can call 1-800-662-HELP.

Switching to cigarettes or other combustible products is not a safer option.

Public Health Warning: Stop using vaping products

Public health officials have now linked a second Oregon death to the use of vaping products. The Oregon Health Authority urges Oregonians to stop using all vaping products until federal and state officials have determined the cause of serious lung injuries and deaths linked to the use of both cannabis and nicotine vaping products. No vaping products should be considered safe. Until health experts can identify why people who have used these products have become seriously ill, and in some cases died, no vaping product should be used. State health officials will continue to work closely with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration to determine the cause of deaths and illnesses in Oregon and across the nation.

Sunset Bay State Park Beach health advisory lifted on Sept. 26 - 09/26/19

Sept. 26, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Sunset Bay State Park Beach health advisory lifted on Sept. 26

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Sunset Bay State Park Beach located in Coos County. The health authority issued the advisory Sept. 18 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

Percentage of people with health insurance remains high, according to Oregon Health Insurance Survey - 09/26/19

Sept. 26, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

2019-Oregon-Health-Insurance-Survey

Percentage of people with health insurance remains high, according to Oregon Health Insurance Survey

Ninety-four percent (94%) of Oregonians have health insurance, according to a new report released today by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). The findings come from the Oregon Health Insurance Survey, which asks people in 8,000 Oregon households about insurance coverage, access to care and health care use.

The survey, conducted between February and August 2019, found that nearly 3.9 million Oregonians have health coverage. That’s about a 10 percent increase since 2013, before the Affordable Care Act went into effect.

“The number of Oregonians with health insurance remains high, and that’s important to acknowledge as a success,” said Jeremy Vandehey, director of health policy and analytics. “However, we continue see that too many young adults lack coverage, and we know that many people have coverage with high deductibles and out-of-pocket costs. There’s still a lot of work we can do together to address the rising cost of health care and access to quality care.”

According to the survey, nearly half (49 percent) of Oregonians are covered by private group policies. About one-quarter (25 percent) receive health coverage through the Oregon Health Plan, which includes Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and the Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment program. Another 15 percent have Medicare coverage, 4 percent have individual coverage, and 6 percent are uninsured.

There was a slight increase (0.2 percent) in the percentage of people with health insurance since 2017. The increase is not statistically significant.

Other early highlights of the 2019 Oregon Health Insurance Survey:

  • Health insurance coverage through an employer increased slightly in 2019
  • Health insurance coverage differs by age
  • Younger adults are less likely to have coverage compared to older adults
  • About 89 percent of young adults in Oregon have health coverage

OHA will release a series of deeper dives into the Oregon Health Insurance Survey data. The first topics will include the costs of health care, underinsurance and coverages rates by counties and regions.

Read the Report

Oregon Health Insurance Survey

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 26 - 09/25/19

September 25, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 26

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 26, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly Lincoln Building), 421 SW Oak St, Portland, OR, 8th Floor, Suite 850, Mary Conference Room (limited space available). The public also may join remotely through a webinar and conference line at 888-398-2342, participant code 5731389.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; Clinical Quality Metrics Registry (CQMR) training plan: demonstration, training updates; health care interpreter reporting; continuous enrollment for 2020 immunization incentive measures – TAG input; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets September 26 - 09/25/19

September 25, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets September 26

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Finalize decision-making model; review and discuss community survey results; select strategies and activities to further goals; create grant workgroup.

When: Thursday, September 26, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, visit the RBHC website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets October 10 - 09/23/19

September 23, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets October 10

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee.

Agenda: Planning for Health Emergencies: a toolkit for families of children with special health needs; State EMS and Trauma Program; AmeriCorps VISTA Member Project; EMSC Program; pediatric drug and chemical abuse; Pediatric Readiness Quality Collaborative; Safe Kids; injury prevention outreach.

When: Thursday, Oct. 10, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Phone conference line: 877-336-1831, access code 640551.

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at http://www.oregonemsc.org/.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Rachel Ford at 971-673-0564, 711 TTY or achel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us">rachel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets by conference call October 1 - 09/23/19

Sept. 23, 2019

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission (OCC).

Agenda: OCC coordination with subcommittee; establish subcommittees on research leadership, patient/social equity, and frame working: process to determine subcommittee members, subcommittee sponsor or OCC member involvement, subcommittee directives and goals, and deadlines or timeframes for directives and goals.

When: Tuesday, Oct. 1, noon to 1 p.m.

Where: By conference call at 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, the commission advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information please visit the commission’s website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2laM0If

Mill, Hubbard Creek, Nye and D River Beach health advisories lifted September 23 - 09/23/19

Sept. 23, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Mill, Hubbard Creek, Nye and D River Beach health advisories lifted September 23

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted public health advisories for contact with marine water at Mill Beach located in Curry County, Hubbard Creek Beach located in Curry County, Nye Beach located in Lincoln County, and D River Beach located in Lincoln County. The health authority issued the advisories after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., begins as Oregon's state health officer - 09/19/19

September 19, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., begins as Oregon’s state health officer

Former deputy health officer at San Diego County will be based at Oregon Public Health Division in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Dean Sidelinger, M.D., former deputy health officer at the San Diego County (Calif.) Health and Human Services Agency, is Oregon’s new state health officer.

Sidelinger takes over from Katrina Hedberg, M.D., who has served as acting state health officer since retiring May 31 after nearly 30 years of state service. He began the position, based at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division in Portland, on Monday, Sept. 16.

As Oregon’s state health officer, Sidelinger says he looks forward to "continuing to work upstream -- on policies, systems, and environmental changes, as well as programs -- that can have a long-standing impact on improving people’s health.

"Working on the social influencers on health -- from education, economic opportunities, health equity, and other areas -- will allow public health to positively influence health in a multitude of ways," he says. "The state health officer has the privilege to help ensure that Oregonians are the healthiest that they can be. I will look at what is impacting the health of residents, and work with partners to implement policies and programs to support wellness."

As San Diego County deputy public health officer, Sidelinger fulfilled the duties of the vacant public health officer position and oversaw the county’s six Public Health Services branches, including California Children’s Services; Epidemiology and Immunization Services; HIV, STD, and Hepatitis; Maternal, Child, and Family Health Services; Public Health Preparedness and Response; and Tuberculosis and Refugee Health. He also was deputy health officer for San Diego County Health and Human Services from 2007 to 2011.

Since 2012 Sidelinger has been San Diego County’s child health medical officer, providing strategic direction for agency programs affecting children and families as part of implementation of the county’s Live Well San Diego vision to build a healthy, safe and thriving community. Additionally, he spent a year, starting in January 2013, as interim Maternal, Child, and Family Health Services chief. He also has experience in academia -- he was an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego, from 2003 to 2007.

Sidelinger earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and his medical degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. He has a master’s degree in education from the University of Southern California as well.

Sidelinger believes his education and training in pediatrics and public health help him take a broad view of health and incorporate the influences of family, community, and the broader region on health.

"I have spent over a decade working in a large health and social services agency, which required partnerships across government agencies and many partners throughout the community," he says. "This basis in collaboration will help me to best serve Oregonians in my new role."

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Video link: https://youtu.be/asCdJmeoEy8

Mill Beach health advisory issued September 19 - 09/19/19

Sept. 19, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Mill Beach health advisory issued September 19

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Mill Beach in Curry County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Mill Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Beach water advisory audio and video resources