Roseburg Police Dept.
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Pedestrian Safety Event Results - 07/18/18

Thanks to a grant obtained through Oregon Impact, the Roseburg Police Department participated in the 3rd and final pedestrian safety crosswalk event for 2018.  The last event was held on Monday, July 16th, 2018.  These events are designed to raise awareness regarding pedestrian safety at crosswalks, and to enforce traffic laws related to crosswalk areas.

During this last event there were 29 citations issued for crosswalk violations, 3 for driving uninsured, 1 for unlawful use of a cell phone, and 2 for driving with a suspended license.  There were also 19 warnings issued for crosswalk violations and 30 informational pamphlets were handed out.

During all three events there were 116 citations issued for crosswalk violations, 13 for safety belt violations, 27 for driving uninsured, 10 for driving while suspended or without a license,  and 3 arrests were made.  There were 17 other citations issued for other traffic violations. 

 

When turning at a traffic signal, drivers must:
* Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane into which your vehicle is turning and at least 6 feet of the next lane.

At any other crosswalks - whether marked with paint or unmarked - drivers must:
* Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane in which you are traveling (or into which you are turning) and the next lane.
* Stop and remain stopped for students as you are directed by a crossing guard.
* Stop and remain stopped for a blind pedestrian using a white cane or a guide dog until the pedestrian is completely across the roadway.

Safety Tips

* Remember, under Oregon law there is a crosswalk at every intersection.
* Do not pass a vehicle stopped at a crosswalk. A stopped car may be a clue that a pedestrian is crossing. When stopping for a crosswalk on a multi-lane road, you should stop about 30 feet before the crosswalk so you don't block visibility to a driver in a second lane.
* When stopping at an intersection, do not block the crosswalk. This forces pedestrians to go around your vehicle and puts them in a dangerous situation.
* Watch for pedestrians, especially children, when exiting driveways or when backing out of parking spaces in parking lots.
* Pedestrians move at different speeds. Be alert for children who may suddenly dart into the street. Be patient with older adults who take extra time to cross the street.
* Around taverns and bars, be alert for people with slowed reaction times or impaired judgment.
* Be alert for people or animals during low-light conditions, especially in areas where they are likely to cross the road, or you might not see them until it is too late to stop.

 

Pedestrian Safety Crosswalk Event - 07/11/18

The Roseburg Police Department will be taking part in a pedestrian safety enforcement blitz on Monday, July 16th. The ability to take part in this event was made possible by a grant that was obtained through Oregon Impact.

The Roseburg Police Department will have Officers on duty who will be conducting pedestrian safety events around crosswalk areas in the City of Roseburg to enforce laws regarding pedestrian safety.

The goal of this event is to reduce pedestrian injuries and fatalities and to remind drivers to be cautious when approaching crosswalks, and to yield to pedestrians who are utilizing those crossing areas. According to statistics provided by the Oregon Department of Transportation, pedestrians accounted for an average of 14% of traffic fatalities from 2008 through 2010 in Oregon. For 2008-2010, an average of 660 pedestrians were injured and 51 killed in motor vehicle crashes. Oregon's streets and highways are busy -- roadways that must be shared by drivers and pedestrians alike. The majority of driver errors in motor vehicle / pedestrian crashes are a failure of drivers to yield to the pedestrian. And half of the pedestrians who are struck by vehicles are hit while they are in a crosswalk. Pedestrians and motorists both share in the responsibility of pedestrian safety. However, under Oregon law, drivers have specific responsibilities.

When turning at a traffic signal, drivers must:
* Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane into which your vehicle is turning and at least 6 feet of the next lane.

At any other crosswalks - whether marked with paint or unmarked - drivers must:
* Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane in which you are traveling (or into which you are turning) and the next lane.
* Stop and remain stopped for students as you are directed by a crossing guard.
* Stop and remain stopped for a blind pedestrian using a white cane or a guide dog until the pedestrian is completely across the roadway.

Safety Tips

* Remember, under Oregon law there is a crosswalk at every intersection.
* Do not pass a vehicle stopped at a crosswalk. A stopped car may be a clue that a pedestrian is crossing. When stopping for a crosswalk on a multi-lane road, you should stop about 30 feet before the crosswalk so you don't block visibility to a driver in a second lane.
* When stopping at an intersection, do not block the crosswalk. This forces pedestrians to go around your vehicle and puts them in a dangerous situation.
* Watch for pedestrians, especially children, when exiting driveways or when backing out of parking spaces in parking lots.
* Pedestrians move at different speeds. Be alert for children who may suddenly dart into the street. Be patient with older adults who take extra time to cross the street.
* Around taverns and bars, be alert for people with slowed reaction times or impaired judgment.
* Be alert for people or animals during low-light conditions, especially in areas where they are likely to cross the road, or you might not see them until it is too late to stop.

Pedestrian Safety Event Results - 07/03/18

Thanks to a grant obtained through Oregon Impact, the Roseburg Police Department has participated in 2 pedestrian safety crosswalk events so far in 2018.  The first event was held on May 7th and the second one occurred on June 18th, 2018.  These events are designed to raise awareness regarding pedestrian safety at crosswalks, and to enforce traffic laws related to crosswalk areas.

During the first two events there were 87 citations issued for crosswalk violations, 13 for safety belt violations, 24 for driving uninsured, 8 for driving while suspended or without a license,  and 3 arrests were made.  There were 16 other citations issued for other traffic violations. 

There will be one more event in Roseburg this year occurring the week of July 16-20th, 2018.

When turning at a traffic signal, drivers must:
* Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane into which your vehicle is turning and at least 6 feet of the next lane.

At any other crosswalks - whether marked with paint or unmarked - drivers must:
* Stop and remain stopped for pedestrians until they have cleared the lane in which you are traveling (or into which you are turning) and the next lane.
* Stop and remain stopped for students as you are directed by a crossing guard.
* Stop and remain stopped for a blind pedestrian using a white cane or a guide dog until the pedestrian is completely across the roadway.

Safety Tips

* Remember, under Oregon law there is a crosswalk at every intersection.
* Do not pass a vehicle stopped at a crosswalk. A stopped car may be a clue that a pedestrian is crossing. When stopping for a crosswalk on a multi-lane road, you should stop about 30 feet before the crosswalk so you don't block visibility to a driver in a second lane.
* When stopping at an intersection, do not block the crosswalk. This forces pedestrians to go around your vehicle and puts them in a dangerous situation.
* Watch for pedestrians, especially children, when exiting driveways or when backing out of parking spaces in parking lots.
* Pedestrians move at different speeds. Be alert for children who may suddenly dart into the street. Be patient with older adults who take extra time to cross the street.
* Around taverns and bars, be alert for people with slowed reaction times or impaired judgment.
* Be alert for people or animals during low-light conditions, especially in areas where they are likely to cross the road, or you might not see them until it is too late to stop.

 

Roseburg Police Department press release! - 06/26/18

During Chief Burge’s final month as police chief, he has awarded two non-profit organizations and four community members with the Police Chief’s Award.  The prestigious Police Chief’s Award is reserved for community members who made a significant contribution in furthering the mission of the Chief of Police and/or significantly aided the Chief of Police in achieving the Police Chief’s goals and objectives during his tenure.  

Two of the awards were presented to the Douglas County Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and Coleen Roberts.  NAMI and Roberts were instrumental in bringing a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training to the first responders of Douglas County.

Chief Burge commented, “I am thankful for the partnership with the Douglas County Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the hard work of its members, particularly Coleen Roberts, in bringing such valuable training to Douglas County.  They developed and delivered a Crisis Intervention Team program that has been beneficial to our local first responders in providing compassionate and caring service to mentally ill persons in crisis.”

Chief Burge also presented the Police Chief’s Award to the Friends of the Umpqua Valley Police K9 Programs, Rosemarie Wess, and Wally and Yuki Taylor.  Chief Burge noted, “The support of our police canine program by our citizens including non-profit organizations such as Rosemarie Wess and the Friends of the Umpqua Valley Police K9 Programs; the Umpqua Valley Humane Society and the Umpqua Valley Mounted Posse; local businesses including Bailey Veterinary Clinic and Douglas County Farmer’s Co-Op; and the benevolent personal contributions of Wally and Yuki Taylor, along with many supportive citizens has been instrumental in building a very successful and respectable police canine program.”

As Chief Burge winds down his last week of being police chief he had these departing words:

“After nearly 38 years in law enforcement, 31 of which I have had the honor to serve the citizens of Roseburg and Douglas County, I have decided to retire.  I have had a very rewarding career with the pinnacle being the last eight years as the Chief of Police for the Roseburg Police Department.  The men and women of our police department are phenomenal.  They are dedicated and passionate about their service to our citizens.  They are very professional - not only in their dedication and conduct but also in their education.  I am very grateful for the support and guidance of City Manager Lance Colley.  He has done wonders for the city as a whole and the police department in particular.  He is truly a great leader to an outstanding group of department directors and city employees - he is an asset to this community.  Behind every leader is a cadre of support.  In my case, it started with every sworn and non-sworn member of the organization.  I have been especially blessed to have two great assistants during my tenure as police chief, both of whom are retiring with me; Captain Jerry Matthews and Administrative Assistant Yvonne Russell have managed the day-to-day affairs and activities of the police department long before my appointment to police chief in 2010.  I am very pleased and confident in the selection of Gary Klopfenstein as the next leader of the Roseburg Police Department.  He is a driven, ethical and professional police officer who is very capable and excited to lead a new generation of police officers who have demonstrated their ability to provide outstanding customer service to our citizens.”

Chief Burge plans to remain in the Roseburg area with his wife, Circuit Court Judge Frances Burge, who continues to serve the citizens of Douglas County.