Oregon Dept. of Forestry
Emergency Messages as of 10:34 pm, Sat. Jul. 2
No information currently posted.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Dept. of Forestry.
Primary email address for a new account:

  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meets July 8 via Zoom - 07/01/22

SALEM, Ore. – The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee will meet virtually Friday, July 8 at 2 p.m. Items on the committee’s agenda include:

  • Formulating testimony for the July 20 Board of Forestry meeting

This meeting is open to the public. The Zoom log-in is https://odf.zoom.us/j/91982691451. The meeting agenda with links to reference materials will be posted on the department’s website.

Public comment is scheduled at the beginning of the meeting. To submit written comment, email ftlac.comment@odf.oregon.gov. Written comment sent at least 48 hours before the meeting will give the FTLAC time to review and consider information. Comment submitted after that window of time will be sent to the FTLAC after the meeting, entered into the record and posted online. Comment is not accepted after the meeting concludes.

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 72 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.

Media Advisory: Forestry Department to host media availability on wildland-urban interface and wildfire risk map - 06/30/22

SALEM, Ore.—Press conference scheduled at 3:30 p.m., July 5.

The Oregon Department of Forestry will hold a press availability on July 5 at 3:30 p.m. to share details and answer questions about the recently released wildland-urban interface (WUI) and statewide wildfire risk map.

The map, available through the Oregon Explorer, is a tool to help inform decision making and planning related to mitigating wildfire risk for communities throughout Oregon. 

ODF Fire Protection Chief Mike Shaw, Wildfire Programs Director Doug Grafe, and others will be on hand to answer questions about the map’s function, purpose, and potential defensible space requirements.  

Members of the media who wish to attend must RSVP by 3 p.m., July 1, by emailing facilitator Derek Gasperini at derek.gasperini@odf.oregon.gov. An RSVP confirmation email will include the Zoom link for the event and login information.

David Bugni (center holding plaques) and his wife, Mary Ann (not pictured), are Oregon's new Tree Farmer of the Year. Also pictured from left are Chad Davis (US Forest Service, Josh Barnard (Oregon Department of Forestry), Dick Courter, Wylda Cafferata an
David Bugni (center holding plaques) and his wife, Mary Ann (not pictured), are Oregon's new Tree Farmer of the Year. Also pictured from left are Chad Davis (US Forest Service, Josh Barnard (Oregon Department of Forestry), Dick Courter, Wylda Cafferata an
Clackamas County couple named Oregon Tree Farmer of the Year (Photo) - 06/30/22

ESTACADA, Ore. – David Bugni and his wife, Mary Ann, believe in leaving the forest on their land near Estacada in Clackamas County better than they found it. The Bugnis’ careful stewardship has earned them the 2022 Oregon Tree Farmer of the Year title.

The award was bestowed last week by the non-profit Oregon Tree Farm System (OTFS). Runners up were Linn County landowners Mike and Jo Barsotti. 

Steve and Wylda Cafferata are co-chairs of the OTFS Board. They said, “The Oregon Tree Farm System's membership is proud of Mary Ann and David Bugni's stewardship. We celebrate it both as an excellent example of active management and as representative of the good work all dedicated small woodland owners do to promote forest health and the values of wood, water, wildlife and recreation. Mary Ann and David ably fulfill the OTFS purpose of making Oregon better, one acre at a time.”

For more than a decade, the Bugnis have planted about 500 tree seedlings of diverse native species each year on their property. In 2014, the Bugnis thinned a 20-acre parcel of 60-year-old Douglas-fir on their property. The harvest generated 238,000 board feet of saw logs along with 258 tons of pulp. They followed up by planting 2,000 Douglas-fir seedlings as replacements and 1,000 western redcedar in shadier areas. They also work to protect the native ecosystem by keeping out invasive species, such as holly, blackberry and reed canary grass.

To benefit wildlife, each year they girdle seven trees to create snags. Many birds and mammals, build nests in the dead trees or use them as hunting perches. The snags are also food for a variety of insects eaten by woodpeckers. 

Improving fish habitat is also important to the Bugnis. They are involved with the Clackamas River Basin Council’s “Shade Our Streams” program. As part of that program, they have planted over 6,000 native deciduous and conifer trees and shrubs along over 1,800 feet of Suter Creek, which runs through their land. In 2015, David obtained a grant from PGE ($295,660 plus $83,403 of in-kind donations of services and materials) to replace two, 6-foot diameter twin, fish-blocking culverts within Suter Creek with a new, precast concrete bridge. The following year he received the Cole Gardiner Stewardship Award from CRBC for “Outstanding efforts in stewardship of the Clackamas River watershed.”

“The Bugnis model a responsible, sustainable approach to forest management,” said Oregon State Forester Cal Mukumoto. Their work provides great examples for other landowners who want to manage for both wood products and the environmental benefits forests provide.”

In 2019, David secured a large grant from PGE’s Clackamas River Hydroelectric Project Mitigation and Enhancement Fund (over $207,000 plus $48,550 of in-kind donations). The grant paid for the placement of 95 logs (via helicopter due to lack of road access) along about one mile of Suter Creek. Bugni got agreement from four different property owners for the project. Combined, the two projects have restored two miles of Suter Creek and opened up over five miles of creek to migrating salmon and steelhead. 

David shares his knowledge of practical forest management in articles for the Clackamas County Farm Forestry Association, whose board of directors he has been on since 2019. He also lets students from the Fisheries Technology Program at Mt. Hood Community College perform their term-long capstone research project on his land, allowing them to collect data on stream and woodland conditions.

Prior to the pandemic he presented information about stream-crossings for woodland owners at the Tree School held at Clackamas Community College. And he was co-presenter in 2020 with Dave Stewart from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on fish habitat restoration for forestland owners. 

Rick Zenn, Director of the Oregon Small Woodlands Association, summed up the Bugnis’ impact: “The greater community is very well served by the Bugnis' effort to educate the public and share their work. They are excellent representatives of family forest owners, demonstrating the public benefits that forest stewardship provides. Their ongoing efforts are yielding good outcomes. They are true community leaders.” 

                                                            # # #

Committee for Family Forestlands meets July 7 - 06/30/22

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually Thursday, July 7 from 9 a.m. to noon. To join the virtual meeting, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment at this virtual meeting, please email forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Forest Resources Division update
  • Presentation plan to Board of Forestry
  • Small Forestland Grant Program update
  • SB762 projects to date discussion
  • Recruitment for Northwest Oregon region committee member

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by emailing forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.

Wildland-urban interface and statewide wildfire risk map available June 30 - 06/28/22

SALEM, Ore.—The wildland-urban interface (WUI) and statewide wildfire risk map will be available through the Oregon Explorer online tool June 30, as required by Senate Bill 762 (2021). The map is a tool to help inform decision making and planning related to mitigating wildfire risk for communities throughout Oregon.

Oregon State University is producing the map based on administrative rules adopted by the Board of Forestry at their June 8 meeting. The rules—developed in consultation with a rulemaking advisory committee comprised of 26 members representing a wide variety of stakeholder interests—outline:

  • boundary criteria for the WUI, 
  • how each of five wildfire risk classes are assigned to individual properties, 
  • how property owners in the extreme and high risk classes are to be notified, and
  • how property owners may appeal their assigned risk class.

With the rules in place, OSU has been working diligently to create the map and have it available June 30. Out of a total number of 1.8 million tax lots in Oregon, ODF and OSU currently estimate the map will identify:

  • 4.4% of Oregon’s land area is in the wildland-urban interface, which includes 956,496 tax lots. 
  • 8% of total tax lots in Oregon are in the wildland-urban interface and in high or extreme risk classifications, which is 120,276 tax lots.
  • Approximately 80,000 of the 120,276 tax lots in the WUI and high or extreme risk classifications currently have a structure that may be subject to new codes or standards, which is about 5% of tax lots. 

Property owners in the high and extreme risk classes will receive written notice from ODF indicating the property’s risk class and whether it’s in the wildland urban interface. The notice will inform them if they may be subject to future defensible space or building code requirements and how to find information on those requirements. It will also provide information on the process to appeal a property’s risk classification.

While property owners in the high and extreme risk classes will receive letters about their property, anyone can use the online risk map to get information on where they live. 

ODF will soon announce information sessions to address questions about the map’s function and purpose and help Oregonians understand the process to appeal their risk class.  

For properties in the WUI and a risk classification of high or extreme, Senate Bill 762 requires actions to help mitigate the risk of wildfire through adoption of defensible space and home hardening building codes. Oregon State Fire Marshal is passing defensible space code requirements through a public process. Code adoption of defensible space requirements will occur December 2022, after the map validation and appeals period is closed. Those requirements won’t apply until later. Visit OSFM’s website for more information. Building Codes Division (BCD) will adopt home hardening building codes through a public process. Building codes will be adopted October 1, 2022 and will be effective April 1, 2023. Visit BCD’s website for more information.

This area of Arch Cape will become a community forest protecting the watershed for north coast residents.
This area of Arch Cape will become a community forest protecting the watershed for north coast residents.
Water District in Clatsop County secures property to establish a community forest at Arch Cape (Photo) - 06/28/22

ARCH CAPE, Ore. —The Arch Cape Domestic Water Supply District realized the vision of connecting the community to its drinking-water source with the purchase of roughly 1,500 acres of forestland. The purchase, finalized in June 2022, was made possible with $5.5 million in federal funding and $250,000 in Clatsop County funding. It will establish the publicly owned Arch Cape Forest.

The district finalized the acquisition with the current owner, Ecotrust Forests II LLC, on June 9 for $4.7 million. Purchasing the watershed, which is next to both Oswald West State Park and Cape Falcon Marine Reserve, will permanently protect the source of Arch Cape’s drinking water from the headwaters to the tap. 

“The health and resilience of the surrounding forest directly controls both the quantity     and the quality of our domestic drinking water,” said Phil Chick, District Manager, Arch Cape Domestic Water Supply District. “The acquisition of the forest permits watershed management primarily for the protection of our water, while providing potential conservation, recreation, and economic benefits.”

A healthy forest with diverse streamside vegetation is vital to holding soil in place, preventing erosion, and improving downstream water quality. All of the water consumed in Arch Cape arrives first as rain falling on spruce, hemlock and cedar trees in the upper reaches of the watershed. The headlands rise nearly 3,000 feet in the two miles between the Pacific Ocean and Onion Peak, the second highest peak in Clatsop County and one of the taller peaks in the Oregon Coast Range. Ultimately, this water makes its way down Shark and Asbury creeks to be used as a community drinking water supply. 

Funding for the project came from a variety of sources, including approximately $3.5 million from the U.S. Forest Service’s Forest Legacy Program. Another $2 million came from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) through Business Oregon.

Amy Singh, an administrator with the Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Forest Legacy Program, explained that $3.5 million for this purchase came from the USDA Forest Service through its Land and Water Conservation Fund, which supports the nationally competitive Forest Legacy Program. 

“ODF partners with the Forest Service to evaluate worthwhile projects in Oregon where local people want to keep forestlands intact to benefit their community and economy,” said Singh. “Arch Cape is a great example of how the program does that while benefitting the environment and protecting the forested character of the area.”

Business Oregon provided $2 million in funds from the federal American Rescue Plan Act to help secure the land. North Coast Land Conservancy (NCLC) used the land value of a portion of the Rainforest Reserve as an in-kind match to help meet requirements of the Forest Legacy grants. Remaining match requirements were met by $250,000 from Clatsop County and nearly $300,000 from community contributions.

Attorneys Greg Fullem and Janna Davydova provided legal counsel through the pro-bono program at the Portland-based firm of Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt.

A shared vision for the north coast

“Although the Arch Cape Forest and Rainforest Reserve are two unique projects, they have a shared vision: protecting our forest, improving water quality, and sustaining a higher quality of life for the people, plants and wildlife that inhabit the northern Oregon Coast,” said NCLC Executive Director Katie Voelke. 

The Water District will remain the owner of the property and is advised by a community advisory committee. Sustainable Northwest, a regional nonprofit, provided strategic planning and project management to the core group of local volunteers and leaders over the course of the 5-year campaign.

In 2019, representatives of the Water District board, district staff, consultants, and community members with extensive financial and timber industry experience assembled a baseline financial plan that confirmed the feasibility for the purchase and long-term management of the property. 

In 2021, a seven-member community advisory committee voted to adopt a set of forest management policies created through a dialogue with the consulting forester, Springboard Forestry, LLC. Going forward, the community advisory committee will engage the broader public before drafting a 10-year operating plan. 

“The community forest governance model ensures that local people enjoy secure and reliable access to the ecological, social, and economic benefits produced by forests,” said Ben Dair Rothfuss, Conservation Finance Senior Manager for Sustainable Northwest. “The residents and community leaders in Arch Cape volunteered hundreds of hours to make this project possible. We believe that local engagement and ownership will make for a durable and balanced outcome as the community becomes the long-term stewards of the forest.” 

The water district is currently working with NCLC and the Nuveen Natural Capital property management staff at Lewis & Clark Timberlands’ Gearhart office, with support from consulting planners at the NPS Rivers Trails and Conservation Assistance Program, to outline a thoughtful and balanced approach to public access that will allow people to enjoy the natural beauty of the forest while preserving its ecological value. 

A broad public stakeholder engagement process is set to begin in July.

For more information on the Arch Cape Forest, visit www.archcapeforest.org/ and archcapewater.org

Santiam Horse Camp re-opens for first time since 2020 fires; reservations open now - 06/27/22

Santiam Horse Camp in the Santiam State Forest re-opens to campers starting Friday, July 1, with opportunities to book reservations opening today.

Santiam Horse Camp was damaged in the 2020 Labor Day fires, and was closed for the 2021 camping season. You can make a reservation for dates after July 1, 2022. Santiam Horse Camp is primarily for people camping with horses, and some spots are reserved exclusively for equestrians. To make a reservation, visit reserveamerica.com and search for Santiam Horse Camp.

Maps, closure areas, and anticipated re-opening timelines for popular areas are posted to the Santiam State Forest recovery site at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/recreation/Pages/santiam-state-forest.aspx. Re-openings will also be announced on ODF’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Visitors to the area are likely to see a patchwork of fire effects from the 2020 Labor Day fires. Most trees in the camp area survived, but staff and volunteers had to rebuild corrals and other infrastructure. Other areas close to the camp were heavily damaged. Visitors are asked to respect all closures and take particular caution in burned areas.

No matter where you go, outdoor activity comes with some level of risk. Here are some safety tips:

  • Do not enter closed areas.
  • Take extra caution when recreating in burned areas.
  • Be careful when driving on single-lane gravel roads in the forest. Active recovery and logging operations are underway. Keep to the right and anticipate oncoming traffic such as trucks, heavy equipment, and other vehicles.
  • Many forest roads cross multiple ownerships, and levels of road maintenance can vary accordingly.
  • Respect all land closures, public and private.

Oregon Department of Forestry Invites Media to Fire Boss Training - 06/24/22

What: On June 28, the Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Aviation Unit and Northwest Oregon Area will be hosting a media day at their annual Fire Boss amphibious single-engine airtanker training. This training gives our boots-on-the-ground firefighters the opportunity to meet the pilots, become familiar with the aircraft and its capabilities, and get practical experience in air-to-ground communications.  

Details and Visuals: The Fire Bosses will arrive at Hillsboro Airport mid-morning for an orientation to the aircraft and a question-and-answer session. 

After lunch, the aircraft will fly to Henry Hagg Lake to start the practical portion of the training. Washington County Parks personnel will be on-hand to help clear the lake of boaters for their safety and the safety of the Fire Bosses’ pilots. Hagg Lake has been used in the past as a water source for aircraft engaged in wildfire response, including helicopters and Fire Bosses. 

There will be several opportunities for interviews throughout the day with trainees and instructors. 

When: Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Starting Location: Hillsboro Airport, 3355 NE Cornell Rd, Hillsboro, OR 97124
Secondary Location: Henry Hagg Lake, Parking Land, Gaston, OR 97119

Time: 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Hillsboro Airport
           1 p.m.- 3 p.m. at Henry Hagg Lake

So we can plan appropriately, please RSVP by 12 p.m. June 27 by emailing Jessica Prakke, ODF Public Affairs, at jessica.prakke@odf.oregon.gov

New committee established to improve wildfire detection technology - 06/17/22

Salem, Ore.—Oregon is experiencing increasingly extreme fire seasons with devastating impacts. Keeping fires small is critical to protecting Oregonians, their communities and the state’s natural resources from wildfire and mitigating those impacts. The sooner a new fire is spotted, the faster resources can be sent out to fight it. Cameras are a vital detection tool that help response agencies keep watch over millions of acres of forestland, as well as rural and urban communities.

As with all technology, detection cameras are evolving. As new functionality and systems continue to emerge, a new committee was created by the Governor’s Office earlier this year to create a coordinated statewide approach to ensure that camera systems operated by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the Oregon Hazards Lab at University of Oregon (OHAZ@UO) are integrated, interoperable, and complementary. The Wildfire Detection Camera Interoperability Committee’s mission is to build relationships, increase wildfire detection camera interoperability and resilience, ensure cross jurisdictional/cross-governmental communications and cooperation, and identify and implement best practices across the all-risk emergency operations ecosystem. 

The array of ForestWatch cameras feed into multiple dedicated detection centers staffed by highly trained operators that have a proven track record of fire discovery. ALERTWildfire expands camera access to local first responders and provides situational awareness to the public. Joint planning is underway to further build out this network of cameras to complete a statewide infrastructure and to integrate the camera imagery of both platforms so that fire and emergency managers can have immediate situational awareness of fire events. Deployment of University of Oregon’s ALERTWildfire camera system, in conjunction with ODF’s ForestWatch system, will achieve a shared goal of reliable, transparent, and efficient monitoring and response for the sake of fire resiliency in Oregon. 

Committee members include:

  • the Governor’s Office
  • Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF)
  • Oregon Hazards Lab atUniversity of Oregon (OHAZ@UO)
  • Public Safety Agencies
  • Fire Agencies
  • Emergency Managers
  • United States Forest Service
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • Tribal Representation
  • Statewide Interoperability Coordinator

Senate Bill 762 (2021) funded an expansion of ODF’s ForestWatch camera system that currently covers ODF jurisdictions as well as neighboring federal partner and wildland-urban interface lands. OHAZ@UO operates the ALERTWildfire system in Oregon that currently covers additional federal, state, county, private, urban, wildland-urban interface and other jurisdictions. 

###

Scott Altenhoff of Eugene is the new urban and community forestry manager for the Oregon Department of Forestry.
Scott Altenhoff of Eugene is the new urban and community forestry manager for the Oregon Department of Forestry.
Eugene forester takes on new role as head of Oregon Department of Forestry's urban forestry program (Photo) - 06/16/22

SALEM, Ore. – Scott Altenhoff from Eugene is the new manager for the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program. Altenhoff takes over the statewide role from Kristin Ramstad, who is retiring after more than 30 years of service.

“We had many great candidates for this position. In Scott we were pleased to find a tremendous depth of experience, knowledge and skills. He is well known and well respected in urban forestry circles, not just in Oregon but nationally as well,” said Josh Barnard, Chief of ODF’s Natural Resources Division. 

Altenhoff holds a Graduate Certificate in Urban Forestry from Oregon State University. He is an International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Board Certified Master Arborist, Municipal Specialist, and Qualified Tree Risk Assessor. He is also a past president of the Society of Municipal Arborists and sits on the National Steering Committee of the National Urban Wood Network. He also co-chairs the Board of Directors for Canopy Watch International. 

Altenhoff comes to state government from the City of Eugene, where since 2005 he has been a municipal arborist/urban forester. Prior to that he worked for 13 years as a commercial arborist and forest surveyor throughout the Pacific Northwest. In the late 2000s, he taught courses in Beginning and Advanced Arboriculture at Linn-Benton Community College. 

“Scott has a longstanding interest in helping people to better understand and appreciate trees and urban forests. He’s especially keen to share the science showing the benefits to human health from contact with nature in the built environment,” said Ramstad, who was on the selection panel. “As important, he is passionate about helping communities deal with issues such as ensuring equitable distribution of these benefits by planning for adequate tree canopy in every neighborhood.”

Altenhoff said all Oregon cities and towns are now required to increase density under statewide housing law. He said he hopes as communities work to increase housing, he can help them also preserve and expand tree canopy. At the same time, he said Oregon communities also need help to cope with the challenges to tree health from climate change and new pests and diseases.

“We have better information technology that can help communities know more than ever about their trees and how they are distributed. This can help them plan better and take useful actions based on that knowledge,” said Altenhoff.

In his free time, he enjoys international travel, exploring remote natural areas, and spending time with his wife and daughter. 

                                                                    # # #

State Forests Advisory Committee meets June 24 in Salem, virtually via Zoom - 06/15/22

SALEM, Ore. – The State Forests Advisory Committee will meet at 8:30 a.m. Friday, June 24 at ODF headquarters in Salem with a virtual option via Zoom. 

The committee will hear updates on the agency’s response to public comment on draft Annual Operations Plans for fiscal year 2023, the draft Western Oregon State Forest Habitat Conservation Plan and implementation guidelines for the associated Forest Management Plan, and planned upcoming revisions to state forest Implementation Plans. A complete meeting agenda will be posted at: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SFAC.aspx

The State Forests Advisory Committee meeting starts at 8:30 a.m. and will be held at the Oregon Department of Forestry Tillamook Room, 2600 State St., Salem 97310. It will also be livestreamed via Zoom at https://odf.zoom.us/j/98194773093. The public may provide comment either virtually or in person at the beginning of the meeting.

Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7200.

SFAC’s role

The State Forests Advisory Committee (SFAC) includes citizens and representatives of timber, environmental and recreation groups. SFAC provides a forum to discuss issues, opportunities and concerns, and offer advice and guidance to ODF on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan. The plan provides guidance for managing 616,000 acres within the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam State Forests, and several scattered state-owned forest tracts in Benton, Polk, Lincoln and Lane counties through a balanced approach to generate revenue while prioritizing environmental and social benefits.

Committee for Family Forestlands meets June 9 - 06/03/22

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually Thursday, June 9 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. To join the virtual meeting, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment at this virtual meeting, please email forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Forest Resources Division update
  • Plan and draft report to Board of Forestry
  • Forestry Plan for Oregon update and discussion
  • Small Forestland Grant Program update
  • Small Forest Owner update
  • Review of special BOF meetings discussion

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by emailing forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.